Egg preservation...

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by CaboWabo5150, Feb 8, 2012.

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  1. CaboWabo5150
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    CaboWabo5150 Monkey

    Watched the Doomsday Preppers show last night... One thing that caught my attention was the lady covering eggs with mineral oil.. Apparently eggs will last 9-12 months un-refridgerated this way... I did not know this... Which reminds me of how little I do know about food preservation....

    Preserving Fresh Eggs « Preparedness Pro
    tulianr likes this.
  2. carly28043
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    carly28043 Monkey

    9-12 months is a little optimistic. About 6 months is a better average. Mineral oil is not as reliable as a thicker grease. The better the pores are sealed the longer your time frame. Make sure not to use eggs that have any chance of being fertilized. They will go bad much faster.
  3. ghrit
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    ghrit troglodyte Administrator Founding Member

  4. Witch Doctor 01
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    Witch Doctor 01 Mojo Maker

  5. DKR
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    DKR Interesting ideas, interesting stories

    Crusing World sailing magazine

    Long distance sailors and preppers share many issues, food storage, power generation off grid and power storage; water making and storage and soon.

    They have a site
    Cruising, Chartering, Sailing, Sailboats Reviews from Cruising World magazine | Cruising World
    with this month looking at power systems and AGM batteries.

    Past issues featured a article on long term storage of eggs using water glass (sodium silicate)

    Also seen here
    <cite>standeyo.com/News_Files/Food/storing_eggs.html

    </cite><cite>The Old Foodie: April 2009preserving-eggs-otherwayes.html

    And from 1907
    </cite><cite>journals.cambridge.org/article_S0021859600001039</cite>

    This paper (In PDF) from Utah State University - a well regarded institution goes through the many ways to keep eggs. (From 1917 no less!)

    http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1020&context=uaes_circulars&sei-redir=1&referer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Furl%3Fsa%3Dt%26rct%3Dj%26q%3Dwater%2520glass%2520for%2520preserving%2520eggs%26source%3Dweb%26cd%3D12%26ved%3D0CCkQFjABOAo%26url%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fdigitalcommons.usu.edu%252Fcgi%252Fviewcontent.cgi%253Farticle%253D1020%2526context%253Duaes_circulars%26ei%3DxaQyT7zHBMWsiQKkzYizCg%26usg%3DAFQjCNHLxe4EELzB2yfPqjVmcaqE7MEesg#search=%22water%20glass%20preserving%20eggs%22
  6. Falcon15
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    Falcon15 Falco peregrinus Site Supporter

    Well said:

  7. Witch Doctor 01
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    Witch Doctor 01 Mojo Maker

    but do they taste like chicken?
  8. Falcon15
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    Falcon15 Falco peregrinus Site Supporter

    More veal like in consistency and as for taste, mild and very yummy. The Muscovys produce 50% more meat than other ducks and are 40% leaner. Not greasy at all. The females will lay 3 times a season (or more if you have unusually warm weather) and can lay upwards of 30 eggs at a time. Maximum egg production from one muscovy duck is 90 eggs a season. 5 ducks gets you maximum of 450 eggs a season. That is a lot of eggs. If you allow one brood per duck to hatch out, they are able to be culled at 75 days of age, and are pretty much fully grown. 30 birds per duck is 150+ roasted duck dinners. Yummy. This bird is the ULTIMATE stealth fowl. they make little to no noise, do not require a pond (a kiddie wading pool is sufficient, they like to wash and groom), and they are heat and cold resistant. Just make sure you clip the flight feathers or your birds will fly away (they roost in trees in the wild).
  9. VisuTrac
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    VisuTrac Ваша мать носит военные ботинки Site Supporter+++

    If eggs last more than a week around here, it must mean the missus is getting prepared to make some deviled eggs. I don't see us storing any for Months. They slow down in January and ramp right back up mid feb.
  10. larryinalabama
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    larryinalabama Monkey+

    what do you feed them that so inexpensive? Yall cage them?

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