.308 My Load Development - Remmy 700P

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by Opinionated, Oct 29, 2011.

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  1. Opinionated
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    Opinionated Monkey

    It is clear to me this will be a development process. so I'll try and remember to just keep filling out this thread as things progress.


    Please allow me to say this before we get started:

    Today was literally step one in the process. Recently got a new Remington 700P.

    I took some .308 FGMM to use as a "control", and total of 15 cartridges each five loaded with a different powder. That means in this initial set I tested factory ammo, and three powders. Numbered 1-4. Otherwise the components were the same:

    All ammo except #1: Hornady match bullets 168gr HPBT, (fire formed) once fired FGMM brass, Winchester Large Rifle Primers, OCL 2.877in

    Temp: 66 degrees
    Wind: Full value, Left to right. 15 MPH gusting 18 MPH.
    Humidity: Nada clue. It wasn't raining.
    Range: 100 Yards, Otter Creek.

    Each square on the target is 1"x1" (I checked with a ruler). Same point of aim was used for all shots fired.

    Load #1 - Federal Gold Medal Match, Factory ammo. 168gr Sierra HPBT Chrono #1 - 2642fps, Chrono #2 - 2625.

    load1.control.small.
    load #2, 44.0gr Varget. Chrono #1 - 2734fps, Chrono #2 - 2736fps

    load2.rev0.small.
    I realize you may have a problem believing there are three holes there so take a closer look:
    load2.rev0.holes.
    load #3, 41.5gr IMR 4064. Chrono #1 - 2596fps, Chrono #2 - 2577fps
    load3.rev0.small.
    Lower right is a called flyer.

    load #4, 44.0gr Hogdon BL-C(2). Chrono #1 - 2554fps, Chrono #2 - 2526fps

    load4.rev0.small.

    I could be wrong. but I'm pretty sure this rifle shoots OK. smile.
  2. dragonfly
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    dragonfly Monkey+++

    At 100 yds...Yeah, I'd say you are right!
  3. Tango3
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    Tango3 Aimless wanderer

  4. Seawolf1090
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    Seawolf1090 Adventure Riding Monkey

    I just traded a buddy for a Remington Model Seven (M700's little brother), and he has always used 165 gr bullets.
    My frst shooting was with factory Remington 150 gr - shot okay, but I knew it could do better.
    Switched to my handloads - 165 gr. Sierra Gameking over RG4895 powder, WOLF LR primers. Shot two groups at 100 yards, that produced neat three round cloverleafs.
    Plenty good for me!
    Seems Remingtons like mid-weight bullets. ;)
  5. Opinionated
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    Opinionated Monkey

    I'm thinking my next intermediate step is to bump that BL-C(2) load up a little, shoot that powder at 100 again. If nothing goes wonky, take all three loads out to 300 and see if they open up or close up.

    If they close up, 500 is the next stop. Using what I learned to date I'll start fresh at 500, probably have to do some concentricity adjustment, then step it on out to 600, 800 and finally 1000.

    'course that 800 and 1000 is a long ways away (figuratively and chronologically). I've been working on me for a long time now and I am just beginning to get really consistent at 600.

    It is - in my opinion - amazing how much "shooter" figures into the long range equation. I figured there would be math (I hate math) so I steeled myself for that. But dagum! There is sooooooo much more that influences long range precision that is NOT what one would expect from the outside looking in.

    It has really brought me to a whole new level of respect for those who successfully shoot 800 yards and beyond. And I'm only just a little over half way there! [applaud]
  6. munchie3409
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    munchie3409 Monkey

    I am a huge Hornady fan...I shoot their bullets exclusively through my rifles. While I like the 168s...my personal preference are the 178 Amax for longer ranges. Anything under 800 yards, the 168s do fine...but once you go past that...the 168s drop like bricks.

    I use 44grs of Varget since I also reload for 243 and 223, so Varget was good for me.
    NVBeav likes this.
  7. 5artist5
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    5artist5 Monkey

    I really like to use larger test groups. Unless the gun is in a vice there can be all kinds of variation.
    I normally do 4 or 5 shot groups and I will do three of them and throw the worst one out. That way I can be fairly confident that there wasn't some freak occurrence and I miss a significant data point.

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