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TOR A technical summary of the Usenix fingerprinting paper

Discussion in 'TOR | TAILS' started by survivalmonkey, Aug 2, 2015.

  1. survivalmonkey

    survivalmonkey Monkey+++

    Albert Kwon, Mashael AlSabah, and others have a paper entitled Circuit Fingerprinting Attacks: Passive Deanonymization of Tor Hidden Services at the upcoming Usenix Security symposium in a few weeks. Articles describing the paper are making the rounds currently, so I'm posting a technical summary here, along with explanations of the next research questions that would be good to answer. (I originally wrote this summary for Dan Goodin for his article at Ars Technica.) Also for context, remember that this is another research paper in the great set of literature around anonymous communication systems—you can read many more at http://freehaven.net/anonbib/.

    "This is a well-written paper. I enjoyed reading it, and I'm glad the researchers are continuing to work in this space.

    First, for background, run (don't walk) to Mike Perry's blog post explaining why website fingerprinting papers have historically overestimated the risks for users:
    and then check out Marc Juarez et al's followup paper from last year's ACM CCS that backs up many of Mike's concerns:

    To recap, this new paper describes three phases. In the first phase, they hope to get lucky and end up operating the entry guard for the Tor user they're trying to target. In the second phase, the target user loads some web page using Tor, and they use a classifier to guess whether the web page was in onion-space or not. Lastly, if the first classifier said "yes it was", they use a separate classifier to guess which onion site it was.

    The first big question comes in phase three: is their website fingerprinting classifier actually accurate in practice? They consider a world of 1000 front pages, but ahmia.fi and other onion-space crawlers have found millions of pages by looking beyond front pages. Their 2.9% false positive rate becomes enormous in the face of this many pages—and the result is that the vast majority of the classification guesses will be mistakes.

    For example, if the user loads ten pages, and the classifier outputs a guess for each web page she loads, will it output a stream of "She went to Facebook!" "She went to Riseup!" "She went to Wildleaks!" while actually she was just reading posts in a Bitcoin forum the whole time? Maybe they can design a classifier that works well when faced with many more web pages, but the paper doesn't show one, and Marc Juarez's paper argues convincingly that it's hard to do.

    The second big question is whether adding a few padding cells would fool their "is this a connection to an onion service" classifier. We haven't tried to hide that in the current Tor protocol, and the paper presents what looks like a great classifier. It's not surprising that their classifier basically stops working in the face of more padding though: classifiers are notoriously brittle when you change the situation on them. So the next research step is to find out if it's easy or hard to design a classifier that isn't fooled by padding.

    I look forward to continued attention by the research community to work toward answers to these two questions. I think it would be especially fruitful to look also at true positive rates and false positives of both classifiers together, which might show more clearly (or not) that a small change in the first classifier has a big impact on foiling the second classifier. That is, if we can make it even a little bit more likely that the "is it an onion site" classifier guesses wrong, we could make the job of the website fingerprinting classifier much harder because it has to consider the billions of pages on the rest of the web too."

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