Another goodie- hand crank cream separator

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by marlas1too, Apr 8, 2016.


  1. marlas1too

    marlas1too Monkey++

    well was back over to my aunts getting her some more wood split and put in her basement and she gave me a hand crank cream separator just like this one by McCormick
    [​IMG]
     
  2. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    It looks simple enough. I can't remember ever seeing one in use. I think I will look for youtube on it's use.
     
    Aeason and Seepalaces like this.
  3. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member


    Methinks the gravity method to be easier on your back.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
    Aeason, kellory and Seepalaces like this.
  4. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Interesting. Thank you, you save me the trouble of finding one myself.
    What is the method of separation?
     
  5. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    It's like a centrifugal oil/water separator.
     
    kellory likes this.
  6. zombierspndr

    zombierspndr Monkey

    There were two of those at an estate sale I went to recently. One was small and the other one looked to be about the size of the one in the video. They wanted several hundred bucks each for them.
     
  7. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    if you had a dairy that would be useful but for a single cow gravity is easier.
     
  8. duane

    duane Monkey++

    We had a DeLaval large one when I was a kid, hard to get up to speed, but once running, easy to keep running. We sold whole milk, about 4 % butterfat for the most parts in 10 gal cans. If the road was snowed in or to muddy, we had to separate the cream from the milk, 60 to 80 gals of milk if I remember right would fit into 1 10 gal can as cream and thus we could go several days with the cans on hand. They also used to make butter with sour cream and use it up at the cheese factory. My grand mother had a large stone in the basement, 3 feet high and about 5 feet square, and she had large flat pans about 6 in high that she let the cream rise in and then skimmed off. If I remember right the cream would rise in a few hours. She let it sour and make us sour cream sandwiches when we visited. They were very good. Small ones list for over $100 new and large ones are in the several hundreds new.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
    ditch witch likes this.
survivalmonkey SSL seal        survivalmonkey.com warrant canary
17282WuJHksJ9798f34razfKbPATqTq9E7