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Cold Weather Clothing tips

Discussion in 'Survival Topic of the Month' started by Motomom34, Nov 21, 2014.

  1. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    I have learned from growing up in a cold environment that layering is key.

    COLD Weather Survival: Clothing

    As the author of the article asked: What are some of your ideas, or “do’s” or “don’ts”?
  2. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    My layers are as such. Turtleneck or undershirt, sweater, fleece and Patagonia shell that is weather repellent. The shell has a hood but I always have a hat. Sometimes I needs both hat and hood but sometimes not. Now depending on the temp I may just have an undershirt and fleece and omit the sweater.

    For the lower half, depending on the temp I may have on long johns or tights under my pants. I used to have flannel lined pants but they have gotten quite pricey. I have learned that just a layer if panty hose under your pants adds warmth. If needed I will put on a pair of snow pants. I like the bids but some prefer the ones with out.
  3. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    Why don't hunters dress like this anymore? To cold? Now hunting garb seems to blend in with the landscape but I always thought you wanted to be seen to avoid getting shot. Also these old outfits were wool.

  4. vonslob

    vonslob Monkey++

    I try to stay away from cotton. I am a big fan of smart wool. Depending on the temps i will wear wool pants and wool jacket. I always wear wool socks. Layering clothes becomes second nature when you do physical work outside. I use an old army field jacket i wear but do not use the jacket liner, i use a mt hardwear fleece as a liner, works much better. I have several pairs of patagonia thermal bottoms that work well. Huge fan of fleece, works well in windy conditions. Also love danner boots lined with gortex and thinsulate. Love woolrich clothing, have a jacket similar to the one posted above.
    Yard Dart likes this.
  5. NotSoSneaky

    NotSoSneaky former supporter

    Can't beat Gore-Tex and most of the other waterproof / breathable fabrics seem to work just as well.

    As mentioned, dressing in layers is the key to staying warm & dry.
    Yard Dart likes this.
  6. Sojourn

    Sojourn Monkey

    I have a mix of these old jackets that I used to wear for ranch work, as well as the modern Gore-Tex parka's. I really like the old stuff, but the new materials mixed in layers work so much better in my mind. Technology in clothing has improved greatly!! My older jackets let the breeze in and do not withstand the rain like the gore-Tex products. In our NW environment, rain can cause exposure issues just the same as snow country so that is the product I use when it is coming down, layered with fleece and undergarments depending on the temperature.
  7. 3M-TA3

    3M-TA3 Cold Wet Monkey

    I'm one of those people who never seems to get cold. When I was 20 I went backpacking in the Himalayas through a local Community College, and as part of the program there were porters. I got to know them pretty well as we hiked as I made it my job to make sure they had water and when we got to higher cold altitudes as always loaning out my gloves, balaclava, and coat to help keep them warm (The lower elevations are tropical, the upper quite Arctic). One of them confided in me one day that the rumor was that I was part Yeti and asked if it was true. In my 40's when I lived in the mountains I bought a new parka thinking it would get some use, but only wore it once at night. Got all the stuff, but just can't keep it on very long, and yes I'm THAT GUY who wears short and t-shirts in January and February.
    Motomom34 and Yard Dart like this.
  8. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    That was me quite some years ago. These days is seems like I'm WAY less tolerant of cold, tho' being out of doors is still appealing. Save that parka, you'll be glad to have it.
    Pax Mentis and Motomom34 like this.
  9. vonslob

    vonslob Monkey++

    I am a little dude (165 lbs 5'10") i will admit it i get cold quick. When working in the winter it is not too much of an issue because the work is physical, constantly moving. My issue is when i am stationary. I like to be warm so i bundle up. As far as shorts in the winter me too but that was many moons ago. As far as i am concerned you can not have enough cold weather clothing, especially covering your core and upper extremities; head, hands and feet included.
    Motomom34 likes this.
  10. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    I find that it is the climate of where one lives, has more to do with this issue than anything else.... I live in Alaska and the Temps NEVER get higher than 75F, and in winter, we usually are below 32F for months at a time. My Sister lives in San Pedro, CA and she would bundle up her kids in coats, scarfs and mittens if the daytime Temps were below 60F, during their winters. We would go visit, for the Holidays, and Our kids were running around in shorts, and Tees, while her kids were bundled up, looking like they lived in Nome, Alaska, when we all went to DisneyLand, and Knott's Berry Farm. I rarely wear anything besides a Flannel Shirt, unless if is below 32F....
  11. Seawolf1090

    Seawolf1090 Adventure Riding Monkey Founding Member

    I am a lifelong Floridian, but was born in Indiana of stout Hoosier stock. I can tolerate cold a lot better than I can hot. My Florida born Dad was always miffed at me when I'd close my bedroom door at night to keep the furnace heat OUT. I liked it cold at night!
    I'd often go outside in thirties weather here in t-shirt and light pants, not for long but it didn't bother me for a short time. Nowadays as I get older I do seem a bit less tolerant, but still far more so than most Floridians I know. And it gets chilly down here. A few nights in the teens and twenties is not at all rare most winters. Usually that occurs in mid-January. We have already seen two nights hit the low twenties, in November!
    Tully Mars and Motomom34 like this.
  12. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

    One key piece of cold weather gear for me is a balaclava.
    With A Dickie to seal the area around the collar.
    I have both of these and sometimes wear both.

  13. nathan

    nathan Monkey+++

    I use silk. wool, and polypropylene under my coverhalls for hunting, works well for me
    D2wing and Motomom34 like this.
  14. chelloveck

    chelloveck Diabolus Causidicus

    Some thoughts based on my own experiences when soldiering in cold wet conditions.

    1. Keep dry
    2. Layer your clothing and add or subtract layers according to the degree of physical activity...if you're sweating, you have too much insulation and your undergarments will soak and you will diminish the insulation value of your clothing.
    3. Wear socks and underwear that wick moisture away from the skin.
    4. Have detachable innersoles for your boots that you can swap when wet. Woollen inserts will offer better insulation.
    5. Wear a windproof outer shell to reduce effects of wind-chill. Gore-Tex or similar synthetic breathable fabric is preferred.
    6. Wear a hat.
    7. Wear gloves, and keep them as dry as possible.
    8. Have a pair of mittens large enough to accommodate gloved hands.
    9. Wear a balaclava when appropriate...particularly when resting or asleep.
    10. If trekking, have a change of clothing to sleep in. That way your bedding won't get wet and you'll have a more comfortable restful sleep. Change back into damp clothing when arising for the day and reserve the dry clothing for sleeping.
    11. Avoid cotton in cold, severe conditions. Wool is the much better option. Even if wet, wool has much better insulation value than cotton.
    12. Shake off snow and frost before entering warm shelter.
    13. Keep clothing clean. Body oils and dirt will diminish the insulation value of clothing.
    14. Keep boots clean, and as dry as possible. Use newspaper stuffed in wet boots to help draw moisture away from wet leather.
    15. Hiking gaiters or improvised puttees will help keep dirt and snow away from your lower limbs.
    16. Have a pair of sunglasses or the means to improvise snow goggles. It will reduce the risk of snow blindness
    17. Wear a belt. A belt can be used for many purposes other than keeping one's pants up.
    KAS, Moatengator, Motomom34 and 5 others like this.
  15. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    @chelloveck great list. Thanks for posting.

    My grandfather used to put newspaper in the bottom of his boots to help stay warm.
    chelloveck likes this.
  16. Tully Mars

    Tully Mars Metal weldin' monkey Site Supporter+

    Same here. Being a "damn yankee" as they call me here in the buckle of the bible belt I have a hard time still with the heat/humidity. I'm sitting here now in shorts and a T while the Nurse is in sleep pants and a shirt. 35-40 outside and I'll go to the store or whatever like this. I get a lot of looks from southerners that are "nanooked up" in winter gear;)
    Motomom34, stg58 and kellory like this.
  17. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    I have always been a Gore-Tex person. My current shell is in need of replacing. As usual Gore-Tex is pricey so I started shopping. I found that LL Bean now has a Gore-Tex equal. I found an article that said that LL Bean TEK2.5 is as good as, even better then Gore-Tex. I am think of trying this new product but am hesitant because Gore-Tex has served me well over the years.

    TEK2.5® vs Gore-Tex®: A Review of LL Bean’s Exclusive New Waterproof Fabric
  18. Tully Mars

    Tully Mars Metal weldin' monkey Site Supporter+

    The reviews basically said if you plan on being more active while wearing, Gore-Tex is the way to go. Looks to be a toss up except for price.
  19. KAS

    KAS Monkey++

    agreed ...
    I always thought these thing were a little FRUITY untill i got in a bind and it was the obnly thing around so i wore it and i was great
    What i like about it besides it being worm as hell is that when u dont need the hood u just flip it back not like wearing a hat that when u are hot u have to find a place to put it ...
    then u loose it or drop it in the bilge or something like that ...
    kellory likes this.
  20. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    I wear a balaclava as well, when the temps drop, or while hunting. They work well.
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