Constitution?Due Process?The U.S. Activates Skynet

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Quigley_Sharps, Oct 26, 2012.


  1. Quigley_Sharps

    Quigley_Sharps The Badministrator Administrator Founding Member

    Constitution?Due Process?

    http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed...cides-who-gets



    “The [Government Agency] — Now Vested With The Power To Determine The Proper ‘Disposition’ Of Terrorist Suspects — Is The SAME AGENCY That Is At The Center Of The Ubiquitous, Unaccountable Surveillance State Aimed At American Citizens.”
    The Washington Post reports that the same agency which spies on all Americans also decides who is assassinated by drone or otherwise:





    Funny how the Dems only whine about this shit when an R is calling the shots.When they are calling the shots anything goes.

    And anyone that thinks the R's will scale this crap back is just as delusional.
     
    oldawg likes this.
  2. Quigley_Sharps

    Quigley_Sharps The Badministrator Administrator Founding Member

    The first time they drop a Hellfire on American soil you'll know everything is over and the Orwellian nightmare can proceed.
     
    tacmotusn likes this.
  3. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    That would certainly be a "Deal Breaker" for this Monkey....
     
    tacmotusn likes this.
  4. UGRev

    UGRev Get on with it!

    this
     
  5. VisuTrac

    VisuTrac Ваша мать носит военные ботинки Site Supporter+++

    And where is Bradley Manning when we need a wikileak of the locate / detain / disappear / kill list now?
     
  6. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

  7. oldawg

    oldawg Monkey+++

    If my government in it's current form were to fear me enough to place my name on a"kill" list I suppose I would consider it an honor as in it's present form it Should fear the citizens.
     
    tulianr, Sapper John and tacmotusn like this.
  8. tulianr

    tulianr Don Quixote de la Monkey

    I thought that this article tied in nicely with discussion of Skynet. I particularly liked the part which mentioned a Predator drone starting its own engine on the flight line, even though the ignition had been switched off, and fuel lines had been closed. The article is huge, so I heavily edited it. The entire thing is worth the time to read though.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world...6a9392-197a-11e2-bd10-5ff056538b7c_story.html


    Remote U.S. base at core of secret operations

    w-permanentWar26.

    Excerpts:
    DJIBOUTI CITY, Djibouti — Around the clock, about 16 times a day, drones take off or land at a U.S. military base here, the combat hub for the Obama administration’s counterterrorism wars in the Horn of Africa and the Middle East.

    Some of the unmanned aircraft are bound for Somalia, the collapsed state whose border lies just 10 miles to the southeast. Most of the armed drones, however, veer north across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen, another unstable country where they are being used in an increasingly deadly war with an al-Qaeda franchise that has targeted the United States.

    Camp Lemonnier, a sun-baked Third World outpost established by the French Foreign Legion, began as a temporary staging ground for U.S. Marines looking for a foothold in the region a decade ago. Over the past two years, the U.S. military has clandestinely transformed it into the busiest Predator drone base outside the Afghan war zone, a model for fighting a new generation of terrorist groups.

    The Obama administration has gone to extraordinary lengths to conceal the legal and operational details of its targeted-killing program. Behind closed doors, painstaking debates precede each decision to place an individual in the cross hairs of the United States’ perpetual war against al-Qaeda and its allies.

    Increasingly, the orders to find, track or kill those people are delivered to Camp Lemonnier. Virtually the entire 500-acre camp is dedicated to counterterrorism, making it the only installation of its kind in the Pentagon’s global network of bases.
    ………..
    About 300 Special Operations personnel plan raids and coordinate drone flights from inside a high-security compound at Lemonnier that is dotted with satellite dishes and ringed by concertina wire. Most of the commandos work incognito, concealing their names even from conventional troops on the base.
    ………
    Djibouti is the clearest example of how the United States is laying the groundwork to carry out these operations overseas. For the past decade, the Pentagon has labeled Lemonnier an “expeditionary,” or temporary, camp. But it is now hardening into the U.S. military’s first permanent drone war base.
    ........
    Today, Camp Lemonnier is the centerpiece of an expanding constellation of half a dozen U.S. drone and surveillance bases in Africa, created to combat a new generation of terrorist groups across the continent, from Mali to Libya to the Central African Republic. The U.S. military also flies drones from small civilian airports in Ethiopia and the Seychelles, but those operations pale in comparison to what is unfolding in Djibouti.
    ………
    Since January 2011, Air Force records show, five Predators armed with Hellfire missiles crashed after taking off from Lemonnier, including one drone that plummeted to the ground in a residential area of Djibouti City. No injuries were reported but four of the drones were destroyed.
    …….
    As the pace of drone operations has intensified in Djibouti, Air Force mechanics have reported mysterious incidents in which the airborne robots went haywire.

    In March 2011, a Predator parked at the camp started its engine without any human direction, even though the ignition had been turned off and the fuel lines closed. Technicians concluded that a software bug had infected the “brains” of the drone, but never pinpointed the problem.

    “After that whole starting-itself incident, we were fairly wary of the aircraft and watched it pretty closely,” an unnamed Air Force squadron commander testified to an investigative board, according to a transcript. “Right now, I still think the software is not good.”
    ……..
    Whenever a military aircraft is involved in a mishap, the Air Force appoints an Accident Investigation Board to determine the cause. Although the reports focus on technical questions, supplementary documents make it possible to re-create a narrative of what happened in the hours leading up to a crash.

    Air Force officers investigating the crash of a Predator on May 17, 2011, found that things started to go awry at Camp Lemonnier late that night when a man known as Frog emerged from the Special Operations compound.

    The camp’s main power supply had failed and the phone lines were down. So Frog walked over to the flight line to deliver some important news to the Predator ground crew on duty, according to the investigators’ files, which were obtained by The Post as part of a public-records request.

    “Frog” was the alias chosen by a major assigned to the Joint Special Operations Command. At Lemonnier, he belonged to a special collection of Navy SEALs, Delta Force soldiers, Air Force commandos and Marines known simply as “the task force.”
    ………
    Frog coordinated Predator hunts. He did not reveal his real name to anyone without a need to know, not even the ground-crew supervisors and operators and mechanics who cared for the Predators. The only contact came when Frog or his friends occasionally called from their compound to say it was time to ready a drone for takeoff or to prepare for a landing.

    Information about each Predator mission was kept so tightly compartmentalized that the ground crews were ignorant of the drones’ targets and destinations. All they knew was that most of their Predators eventually came back, usually 20 or 22 hours later, earlier if something went awry.

    On this particular night, Frog informed the crew that his Predator was returning unexpectedly, 17 hours into the flight, because of a slow oil leak.
    It was not an emergency. But as the drone descended toward Djibouti City it entered a low-hanging cloud that obscured its camera sensor. Making matters worse, the GPS malfunctioned and gave incorrect altitude readings.

    The crew operating the drone was flying blind. It guided the Predator on a “dangerously low glidepath,” Air Force investigators concluded, and crashed the remote-controlled plane 2.7 miles short of the runway.
    ……….
    But in terms of spilling secrets, the damage was severe. Word spread quickly about the mysterious insect-shaped plane that had dropped from the sky. Hundreds of Djiboutians gathered and gawked at the wreckage for hours until the U.S. military arrived to retrieve the pieces.

    One secret that survived, however, was Frog’s identity. The official Air Force panel assigned to investigate the Predator accident couldn’t determine his real name, much less track him down for questioning.

    “Who is Frog?” one investigator demanded weeks later while interrogating a ground crew member, according to a transcript. “I’m sorry, I was just getting more explanation as to who Frog — is that a person? Or is that like a position?”

    The crew member explained that Frog was a liaison officer from the task force. “He’s a Pred guy,” he shrugged. “I actually don’t know his last name.”

    The accident triggered alarms at the upper echelons of the Air Force because it was the fourth drone in four months from Camp Lemonnier to crash.

    Ten days earlier, on May 7, 2011, a drone carrying a Hellfire missile had an electrical malfunction shortly after it entered Yemeni airspace, according to an Air Force investigative report. The Predator turned back toward Djibouti. About one mile offshore, it rolled uncontrollably to the right, then back to the left before flipping belly up and hurtling into the sea.
    ...........
    w-permanentWar26.
     
    Quigley_Sharps likes this.
  9. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    Reading between the lines just a bit more, ...... Oh, great, rogue, self starting guidance/control compromised armed drones with predesignated prior targets in memory (remember, nothing ever completely deleted), on the loose and looking to kill for Obummer those on it's kill list.
    .
    Now just maybe I have stretched things just a little bit, but is it truly out of the realm of possibility? ....... or is it not?
     
    tulianr, oldawg and Quigley_Sharps like this.
  10. tulianr

    tulianr Don Quixote de la Monkey

    F-16 Takes Off— With No One Inside

    Yesterday's fighter jets are today's drones. Or that's the hope of Boeing and the US Air Force, which have retrofitted retired F-16s to fly as unmanned aerial vehicles, the BBC reports. One of the six new pilot-less planes made the first test flight last week, with two pilots on the ground successfully flying the jet from a Florida base to the Gulf of Mexico at a speed of Mach 1.47, performing barrel rolls and other maneuvers on the way.

    Boeing says the hope is that the planes will eventually be used in training drills, so pilots can practice firing on other planes. "It flew great, everything worked great, (it) made a beautiful landing—probably one of the best landings I've ever seen," says the project's chief engineer.

    But not everyone is impressed. "I'm very concerned these could be used to target people on the ground," says a spokesperson for the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. "There is every reason to believe that these so-called 'targets' could become a test bed for drone warfare, moving us closer and closer to automated killing."

    But unmanned training planes are nothing new for the Air Force, notes CBS: pilot-less Vietnam-era F-4s have been used for decades. The F-16s just offer a faster, more modern opponent for pilots to practice against.


    F-16 Takes Off— With No One Inside - Retired jets retrofitted into drones for Air Force training
     
    Yard Dart and Quigley_Sharps like this.
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