TOR Cooking with Onions: Finding the OnionBalance

Discussion in 'TOR | TAILS' started by survivalmonkey, Sep 19, 2016.


  1. survivalmonkey

    survivalmonkey Monkey+++

    Hello,

    This blog post is the first part of the Cooking with Onions series which aims to highlight various interesting developments on the .onion space. This particular post presents a technique for efficiently scaling busy onion services.

    The need for scaling


    Onion services have been around for a while. During the past few years, they have been deployed by many serious websites like major media organizations (like the Washington Post), search engines (such as DuckDuckGo) and critical Internet infrastructure (e.g. PGP keyservers). This has been a great opportunity for us, the development team, since our code has been hardened and tested by the sheer volume of clients that use it every day.

    This recent widespread usage also gave us greater insights on the various scalability issues that onion service operators face when they try to take their service to the next level. More users means more load to the onion service, and there is only so much that a single machine can handle. The scalability of the onion service protocol has been a topic of interest to us for a while, and recently we've made advancements in this area by releasing a tool called OnionBalance.

    So what is OnionBalance?


    OnionBalance is software designed and written by Donncha O'Cearbhaill as part of Tor's Summer of Privacy 2015. It allows onion service operators to achieve the property of high availability by allowing multiple machines to handle requests for a single onion service. You can think of it as the onion service equivalent of load balancing using round-robin DNS.

    OnionBalance has recently started seeing more and more usage by onion service operators! For example, the Debian project recently started providing onion services for its entire infrastructure, and the whole project is kept in line by OnionBalance.



    [​IMG]



    How OnionBalance works


    Consider Alice, an onion operator, who wants to load balance her overloaded onion service using OnionBalance.

    She starts by setting up multiple identical instances of that onion service in multiple machines, makes a list of their onion addresses, and passes the list to OnionBalance. OnionBalance then fetches their descriptors, extracts their introduction points, and publishes a "super-descriptor" containing all their introduction points. Alice now passes to her users the onion address that corresponds to the "super-descriptor". Multiple OnionBalance instances can be run with the same configuration to provide redundancy when publishing the super descriptor.

    When BOB, a client, wants to visit Alice's onion service, his Tor client will pick a random introduction point out of the super-descriptor and use it to connect to the onion service. That introduction point can correspond to any of the onion service instances, and this way the client load gets spread out.

    With OnionBalance, the "super-descriptor" can be published from a different machine to the one serving the onion service content. Your onion service private key can be kept in a more isolated location, reducing the risk of key compromise.

    For information on how to set up OnionBalance, please see the following article:
    http://onionbalance.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

    Conclusion


    OnionBalance is a handy tool that allows operators to spread the load of their onion service to multiple machines. It's easy to set up and configure and more people should give it a try.

    In the meanwhile, we'll keep ourselves busy coming up with other ways to scale onion services in this brave new world of onions that is coming!

    Take care until the next episode :)

    Continue reading...
     
    Ganado likes this.
survivalmonkey SSL seal        survivalmonkey.com warrant canary
17282WuJHksJ9798f34razfKbPATqTq9E7