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CR0233 PEDERSOLI KODIAK MARK IV DOUBLE RIFLE, .45-70 CALIBER

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by Seacowboys, Apr 1, 2008.


  1. Seacowboys

    Seacowboys Senior Member Founding Member

    Just added to my wish list
    CR0233.JPG
     
  2. Blackjack

    Blackjack Monkey+++

    Re: CR0233 PEDERSOLI KODIAK MARK IV DOUBLE RIFLE, .45-70 CAL

    I've always liked double rifles (African Safari Fantasies).
     
  3. groovy mike

    groovy mike Immortal

    Re: CR0233 PEDERSOLI KODIAK MARK IV DOUBLE RIFLE, .45-70 CAL

    VERY Nice but 45-70 is pretty light for a double. I'll make mine 375 H&H flanged if I win the lottery........

    Just for fun, what is the suggested retail tag on this one?
     
  4. Seacowboys

    Seacowboys Senior Member Founding Member

    Re: CR0233 PEDERSOLI KODIAK MARK IV DOUBLE RIFLE, .45-70 CAL

    around $4500.00 maybe a grand more deluxe grade with a set of 20 ga. barrels too. Also comes in 9.3x74 R and 8x57JRS calibers.
     
  5. Blackjack

    Blackjack Monkey+++

    Re: CR0233 PEDERSOLI KODIAK MARK IV DOUBLE RIFLE, .45-70 CAL

    Lots of money..... If dbl rifles are interesting you, check out Krieghoff, Heym, Searcy.
     
  6. groovy mike

    groovy mike Immortal

    Re: CR0233 PEDERSOLI KODIAK MARK IV DOUBLE RIFLE, .45-70 CAL

    From my local classifieds (today):

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=500 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=adheader bgColor=#ccccff>shotgun [​IMG]</TD><TD bgColor=#ccccff></TD></TR><TR><TD class=bluetext>Cabelas, blk powder, 12ga, dble bbl, yr old, pd $700+, VGC, $450 Trades Clifton Park, NY (518) 857-3120 [​IMG]

    photo here:

    http://www.wantaddigest.com/view/newads.asp?Cat=GUN
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
     
  7. Seacowboys

    Seacowboys Senior Member Founding Member

    Re: CR0233 PEDERSOLI KODIAK MARK IV DOUBLE RIFLE, .45-70 CAL

    <!--endclickprintexclude--> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="2"> <tbody><tr><td>from Guns & Ammo</td></tr> </tbody></table>

    A Most Marvelous Metric
    The 9.3mm holds the light heavyweight crown among European bore sizes and should be more popular stateside than it is.
    By Craig Boddington
    <!--begin image--> <table style="clear: both;" align="left" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5" width="225"> <tbody><tr><td align="left"> [​IMG] NoslerÂ’s Chub Eastman took this bull elk at the NRA Whittington Center with a Winchester Model 70 rebarreled to 9.3x64 Brenneke. A single 250-grain Nosler Ballistic Tip did the trick.
    </td></tr> </tbody></table> <!--end image-->
    <!--begin paragraph-->
    It was a lot like television. I was sitting in a nice, warm cabin, one eye glued to the eyepiece of a big Leica spotting scope. On the screen—rather, in the field of view—was a small group of bull elk on a distant ridge. Behind the elk, on a slightly more distant ridge, were Chub Eastman and Phil Valdez, both shifting to get into position and obviously unable to see the elk I was looking at. This went on for quite some time while I tried to send telepathic signals and, outside the cabin, Mike Ballew tried the same with hand signals.
    Finally, the stalemate broke, and so did the elk, running down into the timber and out of sight of everyone. I looked up from the scope and said to Mike, “That’s the end of that.” Then I looked again. It wasn’t quite over. A bull I had never seen came up out of dead ground and trotted up the spine of the ridge, a bit more than 100 yards from Chub and Phil. The bull stopped, trotted again, stopped again and then went down into the brush as if a giant hand had swept it off its feet. Now it was really over, and so was our bet.
    <!--end paragraph--> <!--begin paragraph-->
    A 9 For New Mexico
    We were hunting on the NRA Whittington Center, and a couple of days earlier IÂ’d gotten lucky and flattened a bull with a little .270. Chub was carrying a cannon on this hunt, so, jokingly, I told him that if his elk went more than three steps after he shot it, it didnÂ’t matter whether his bull was bigger than mine. But I shouldÂ’ve known better than to bet against the marketing director for Nosler Bullets, who is also a former Marine sniper (and still a wonderful rifleman). But Chub cheated. I thought weÂ’d agreed that neck and spine shots wouldnÂ’t count, and his shot was, well, a little closer to a spine shot than a shoulder shot. Still, it was a wonderful offhand shot and an extremely impressive piece of cartridge-and-bullet performance (and that bull was bigger than mine).
    The knockdown wasnÂ’t a surprise. The cartridge Chub was using was the 9.3x64mm Brenneke, one of the few cartridges in existence that offers serious competition to the .375 H&H as a world-standard all-around hunting cartridge. Its problem is that few people in America know anything about it. We also donÂ’t know anything about the caliber, or the several other excellent 9.3mms, but Europeans have relied on them for nearly a century.
    ItÂ’s actually inappropriate to say that the 9.3mm, caliber .366, was continental EuropeÂ’s answer to the British .375 caliber because just the reverse is actually true. At the turn of the century, EuropeÂ’s leading gunmakers started necking early Mauser and Mannlicher-Schoenauer military cartridges to accept heavier bullets of larger calibers. There were a number of cartridges in 9mm (.357), 9.3mm (.366) and 9.5mm (.375), and they fit nicely into the new and wonderfully inexpensive European bolt actions.
    Their popularity scared the British gun trade, and in 1905 Holland & Holland introduced the .400/.375, the first belted cartridge. Underpowered and underwhelming, it had little impact on the growing popularity of 9.3mms, so in 1912 H&H tried again with the .375 H&H as we know it today.
    Things might have been different had World War I not occurred, or had it ended differently. Today the English-speaking world considers the .375 H&H the world’s most versatile cartridge, but Europeans aren’t so sure. Most of the sporting cartridges between 9mm and 9.5mm have faded into history, but there are three 9mms that retain a significant following. They are the 9.3x74R, the 9.3x62 Mauser and the 9.3x64 Brenneke. These three are different in design and power levels, but each is interesting and useful. With more and more American bulletmakers now offering .366-inch bullets, this European “Big Three” deserves a closer look.
    <!--end paragraph--> <!--begin image--> <table style="clear: both;" align="right" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5" width="200"> <tbody><tr><td align="right"> [​IMG] Left to right: 9.3x62 Mauser, 9.3x64 Brenneke, 9.3x74R. Although case size goes from left to right, power does not. The 9.3x62 and 9.2x74R are not much different from the .35 Whelen. The 9.3x64 Brenneke is every bit the equal of the .375 H&H.
    </td></tr> </tbody></table> <!--end image--> <!--begin paragraph-->
    The 9.3x74R
    The 9.3x74R is a rimmed cartridge designed for double rifles and single shots. Dating back to the turn of the century, it has a long (2.93-inch), slender, tapered case that, in appearance, can only be described as “cool.” Unfortunately, it’s one of the more misunderstood among sporting cartridges.
    Although popular as a chambering for single shots (and as the rifle barrel in combination guns), it is most often seen in doubles. Because it is a very slender cartridge, it can be housed in much slimmer actions than those required by the big Nitro Express rounds. Doubles in 9.3x74R are fairly common and are generally much less expensive than doubles chambered to the bigbores. A 9.3x74R double is often thought of as the poor man’s option for a big double, and the cartridge is often described as “just a bit less powerful than the .375.” This is hogwash. The heavy bullets for the 9.3—286 and 293 grains—are long and heavy for caliber. Their sectional density exceeds that of the 300-grain .375 (S.D. of the 286-grain 9.3 is .307, against .305 for the 300-grain .375). This means they penetrate extremely well and, all things being equal, will outpenetrate the 300-grain .375 (a slightly better S.D. plus less diameter and less friction). Except all things are not equal. Depending on whose load you use, the 9.3x74R is at least 200 fps (and as much as 300 fps) slower than the .375, delivering about 1,000 ft-lbs less energy. This becomes more significant if you accept that the .375 H&H has long been considered the sensible minimum for the largest game. The 9.3x74R has been used successfully on the full range of African game up to elephant, but so have many lesser cartridges. It is not “almost the equal” of the .375 and should not be considered a suitable substitute for Cape buffalo and such. It isn’t nearly as versatile as the .375 because its low velocity gives it a very arcing trajectory. So, if you see a 9.3x74R double rifle available at a good price, don’t look at it as the “African double rifle” you’ve always wanted but couldn’t afford. That’s the bad news.
    The good news is that you shouldnÂ’t necessarily walk away from such a rifle, provided you understand what itÂ’s really all about. The 9.3x74R is a hard-hitting and effective cartridge, useful for fairly large game at close range. Recoil is moderate, and while the 9.3x74R is extremely marginal for the very largest game, the only thing that handicaps its versatility on medium game is its practical range limitation.
    The Europeans love it for hunting driven wild boar, where it is truly ideal because the shooting is close. The 9.3x74R hits extremely hard, yet recoil is mild enough that a double so chambered is extremely fast for the second shot. I doubt weÂ’ll start a big run on 9.3x74R doubles, but it would be equally perfect for pig hunting, black bears over bait or with dogs, and even whitetail, elk and moose in close cover.
     
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