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Dairy goats, getting started.

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by RJB, Apr 17, 2007.

  1. RJB

    RJB Monkey+++

    I have a family of four and wanted to get a goat or two. I've done seraches online, but was wondering if any of you guy have any suggestions for books, websites, or suggestions in general for getting and keeping them. I have 7 1/2 acres for pasture in the back that keeps in horses. Do I need a tighter fence for goats? Should I keep a separate smaller pen. How many goats will keep a family of four fed? Thanks.
  2. ozarkgoatman

    ozarkgoatman Resident goat herder

    IMHO anyone who raises livestock should have a book called "The Complete Herbal Handbook For Farm and Stable" by Juliette de Bairacli Levy.

    As far as your fence goes you would have to say what it is. Is it 3 stands of barbwire , is 6' high chainlink, both would keep in horses. We have some fence that is just 3 strands of hot line and 1 barb and it keeps our goats in. But we way undergraze our goats and our fence charger will knock you on your butt. Keeping goats in a small pen is a great way to have lots of worm problems. They are brousers and when forced to eat off the ground you will have problems with worms.

    As far as feeding a family of four, well that depends on the goats and what you really mean by that. Are you talking about all the meat you eat and all of your dairy needs? Then it comes down to how much dairy products you use and how much meat your family eats.

    IMHO LaMancha dairy goats are the best. I've owned all of the larger dairy goats breeds at one time or another. LaMancha's have less problems with worms and are just hardier all around, plus they milk like crazy. [2c]

  3. Blackjack

    Blackjack Monkey+++

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