Dry Beans

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by tacmotusn, Sep 23, 2010.


  1. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    No need to buy expensive survival food vender dry beans in #10 cans.
    .
    You can buy all the dry beans you will ever need locally a whole lot cheaper. Repacking them in reuseable glass canning jars with regular canning lids and rings or with Ball plastic storage caps (also found most anyplace you find canning supplies.) They will store this way as long as you need to store them.
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    No need to buy expensive, two year recommended maximum storage fully cooked and canned supermarket beans either. At one dollar a can or more now days that's just too damn expensive. Take your oldest dated beans dry packed as above and make yourself some fully cooked convenience beans with the recipe below.
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    PRESSURE COOKER RECIPE:
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    Quick Cooking Dry Beans:
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    . have enough jars to fill your pressure canner.
    .in each quart jar add one cup of dry beans, fill jar with water and soak overnight.
    .the next morning pour out the soaking water, and refill with fresh water to 1 inch below the rim.
    .put rings and lids on jars, and snug down.
    .fill canner with recommended level of water (two inches minimum).
    .place jars in canner, pressure cook at 10-15 lbs for appropriate time.
    .quarts 90 minutes.
    .
    note: pints can be done as above by reducing dry beans in each to 1/2 cup and time for canning to 75 minutes.
    .
    Caution: do not exceed 1 cup dry beans in quarts, or 1/2 cup in pints. Beans will expand even more than they have while soaking overnight and very few beans in excess of amount listed will cause some jars to burst in canner and others not to seal.
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    These fully cooked beans can be used just like the expensive supermarket canned ones. One pint is the equal to the store can, and a quart to 2 store cans.
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    salt added to beans prior to canning may result in hard not fully cooked beans. seasonings such as garlic powder or onion powder or others can be added prior to canning if you want at 1/2 teaspoon per pint or one teaspoon per quart.
    .
    Final note: for dry storage purposes 16 lbs dry beans fills 11 quart jars and is then equal to 44 quarts fully cooked. 44 supermarket quarts $88. 16 lbs dry beans $16 or less. Canning helps keep the house warm in winter and adds humidity, and saves you money at least two ways! Do it!
     
  2. CrazySingleMom

    CrazySingleMom Monkey+

    Thanks for this idea! ... I had thought of storing them dry in jars ... but not of cooking them by canning!
    ~R
     
  3. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    I do both. I buy a variety of dry beans on sale in near bulk purchases. I actually prefer the larger plastic bags. Then put them in freezer for 3 weeks or so, double bagged (now in 2 gallon ziplocs as well. This ensures no bugs alive. Then repack in glass quarts. I usually have 60 to 72 quarts of dry beans at any given time. Come winter I take stock of my precooked canned (former dry) beans. I can 42 to 70 quarts/pints for the upcoming years use. Then replenish the dry beans as I catch good prices. It works good for me, and is a whole lot cheaper than supermarket canned beans.
     
  4. CrazySingleMom

    CrazySingleMom Monkey+

    It sounds like a great idea!
    I order (with some other people in my church) bulk items from Country Life Natural Foods ( Country Life Natural Foods ) as we are on one of their trucking routes it makes delivery free :D
    I could sure order some beans from them next mth and do up a bunch like this :)

    Thanks,
    ~R
     
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