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Eye wash options

Discussion in 'Survival Medicine' started by Harbin, May 23, 2012.

  1. Harbin

    Harbin Monkey+

    The other day at work one of the guys I was with got some debris in his eye (no safety glasses while wailing away with a hammer on a rusted motor mount), the company gives us a little first aid kit that had a small eye wash squeeze bottle in it that worked but was just barely enough.

    My question for anyone either with experience using them or any medical folks is which ones do you like? I'd like to add something to the house first aid kit as well as put something out in the shop. I started searching online and found the little ones like we used, just wondered if there are any better options. I'd like to hear if anyone has heard stories of one kind or another making things worse.

  2. sgt peppersass

    sgt peppersass Monkey+

    Do you have a sink nearby? TRhey have fittings available that can attach to a faucet where it splits off to a "y" and on top of each parrt of the "y" is 2 openings with nozzles that direct the spray up into both eyes. Some of the good ones have small flaps over them to protect the nozzles from dirt/debri getting into them. Ill look around and ask my EH&s department if there is any extras laying around.
  3. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    For example -
    Portable / Gravity Fed Eye Wash Stations

    Sorta ill suited for bugging out, but good if no pressurized system is available. Not very portable, but an easy wall mount.

    Here's one if there is a pressurized water system available.
    Bradley S19-200B Ansi-compliant, Faucet-Mounted Eyewash Station

    In any case, flushing with water, lots of it, is a start, and finish with a sterile rinse from one of the small bottles of the "good" stuff. Eyes are far more susceptible to mechanical damage than infections, thus you can use almost any source of clean water (nothing floating in it) as a starter. It is especially important to flush right damn now if there are chemicals involved that can do tissue damage, and pay attention to lifting the lids off the eyeball to get that area cleared as well as the surface itself.
  4. Harbin

    Harbin Monkey+

    That's exactly the kind of info I was looking for. Thanks!
  5. ColtCarbine

    ColtCarbine Monkey+++ Founding Member

    On more than one occasion I've had to irrigate my eyes from foreign debris even wearing safety glasses and a face shield. When flushing the eyes sometimes you have to forcefully open the eyelids, not always an easy task with an irritant in your eye. Sometimes when you think the irritant is gone, is not always the case. I've gone to the doctor to have metal slivers removed from my eyes after the fact. It is my understanding that your eyes heal a lot faster than other parts of the body.

    The advantage of a plumbed-in unit is the never ending supply of water.

    Plumbed-in permanent eye wash stations come in many configurations.

    Emergency Eye Wash and Shower Equipment > Guardian Equipment

    Squeeze bottles with an eye cup work better than just the plain ole' saline squeeze bottles.

    Plum Sterile Saline 200 ml Eye Wash Station Refill, 3/Pack - 29223 - Northern Safety Co., Inc.

    Here's a cool portable eye wash station.

    Emergency Eye Wash and Shower Equipment > Guardian Equipment
    BTPost likes this.
  6. Harbin

    Harbin Monkey+

    I do have a sink in the shop, that sounds like a good option for a permanent solution in there.

    Colt Carbine- That one from Northern Tool looks great, thinking thats the one to add to the first aid kit. Also going to show that one to guys at work, see if we can start carrying something like that instead.

  7. snowbyrd

    snowbyrd Latet anguis in herba

    Urine, in a SHTF situation. Body temp, sterial (sp) same as saline. Also for cuts/irrigation. Minimises (sp again)scaring. Been there done this. Here by comes the saying "pizz in your eye". Got boiling gas in my eye from an overly hot chain saw, irrigated with a gallon of too hot water, still not enough, had my wife, uh, irrigate it, I know brings up bad visions. It saved my vision..........Just say'in......
  8. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Good thinking. Field expedients are worth the thoughts. Contra indications are bladder infections, but even then following with clean water and a sterile flush as soon as possible would be a good thing.
  9. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

    Back when I was younger and wild, I used to (what?) work in construction and frequently got a lot of crud in my eyes. I would end up just grabbing whatever I had on site, milk jugs, bottle caps, tin foil, and utilizing this as a cup to fill with water and press it to my eye, tilt head down and slowly blink with the eye submerged. The debris always fell out.
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