1. The Topic of the Month for June, 2017 is "Organization" Please join the discussion on the forum.

FNAR

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by E.L., Jul 6, 2009.


  1. E.L.

    E.L. Moderator of Lead Moderator Emeritus Founding Member

    I am looking at a .308/7.62 Nato as my next rifle. I am thinking I want a M1A1, but I was wondering if anyone had shot the FNAR.


    [​IMG]



    FNH 7.62x51 (.308) FNAR Semi-Auto Rifle

    by Jeff Quinn
    photography by Jeff Quinn & Boge Quinn
    November 17th, 2008


    [​IMG]FNH-USA continues to introduce interesting and useful fighting weapons. Even while supplying our military with a lot of the arms used to fight terrorism on two different fronts, FNH still has the time and manufacturing capacity to supply the rest of us with new firearm designs. The FNAR shown here has been with me for a couple of weeks now, and has proven to be one hundred percent reliable, and extremely accurate for a fighting rifle. I have long been a fan of the AR-15/AR-10 systems, but there are many who, for whatever reason, do not like the AR gas system, and prefer a piston system for their auto loading rifles. Some manufacturers are building “ARs” with a piston system. If it has a piston, it is not an AR, but something different. Most 7.62x51mm fighting rifles are pretty heavy. My super-accurate DPMS SASS weighs about twelve pounds, but is a fine rifle. Most gas piston rifles of that caliber that are capable of match-grade accuracy weigh as much or more. For those who have been waiting, the new FNAR rifle weighs in at just under eight pounds (7 lbs., 14.8 ounces without magazine to be exact), and uses the short stroke gas piston system. Like its Browning and Winchester auto loading cousins, the FNAR has a very reliable and clean-shooting piston that travels only about ¾ of an inch, sending the action block and twin action rails rearward, unlocking the multiple lug rotating bolt to eject the fired cartridge case, with the under-barrel spring returning the bolt forward to chamber another round. While many find the 5.56mm NATO cartridge to work well for social work, there are times when more power is [​IMG]needed, and in such cases, the 7.62 usually finds favor. The 7.62mm NATO cartridge has a fine reputation for stopping power on the battlefield, and displays excellent accuracy as well in a properly built rifle. In the FNH FNAR, the 7.62 really shines.


    The FNAR rifle comes with all that is needed to custom fit the rifle to the shooter. Like many of our modern auto pistols which come with different grip inserts, the FNAR comes with three different cheek pieces and three different butt pads, to allow the shooter to change the comb height and length of pull for a comfortable fit. In addition, there are six different buttstock shims included with the rifle to change the pitch and cast of the buttstock to perfectly fit any shooter. The most important of these, in my experience, is the comb height. Raising the comb as high as possible to allow the shooter’s eye to be directly in line with the scope, while preserving a good cheek weld on the stock, makes for more accurate shot placement. The stock, while very unconventional in shape, is very comfortable to shoot, whether from the bench or in the field. The pistol grip on the FNAR allows good control of the weapon, placing the hand in a very comfortable and natural position for good trigger control. The trigger operates very smoothly. It has a bit of overtravel, but releases well, and is much better than a standard mil-spec AR trigger, but not as light and crisp as an Alexander or Timney target trigger. Still, it is about ideal for a fighting rifle, with the trigger pull [​IMG]measuring exactly four pounds on the test rifle. The fluted barrel has a matte dark gray finish, and is of a medium profile, measuring .770 diameter at the muzzle. The test rifle came supplied with one twenty-round magazine, and extra magazines of five, ten, and twenty round capacities are offered.

    The buttstock and forearm are of a black synthetic material, and there are plenty of Picatinny rails on the forearm for attaching flashlights, laser sights, and accessories. Sling swivel studs are installed for the easy attachment of a sling. Atop the receiver is a Picatinny rail that is plenty long enough to accommodate an ArmaLite mount, or any other Picatinny compatible scope mount.

    For accuracy testing, I mounted a Leupold Mark 4 scope of 8.5 to 25 power. This fine scope focuses down closely, and provides a clear sight picture from a few feet out to infinity. The settings are repeatable, and the adjustments precise. As stated earlier, this is an accurate rifle. Getting on paper at twenty five yards, I turned to the fifty yard target, where the first three shots went into one hole. Enough of that, so I sighted on the one hundred yard target, where accuracy was also outstanding. At that range, the FNAR was placing three rounds into less than one-half inch, repeatedly, all day long. I was firing Buffalo Bore Sniper ammo through the FNAR. This ammo uses Sierra175 grain Match King bullets, and has proven to be the most accurate factory .308 ammo that I have ever fired, in several rifles. When I have a new .308 rifle in here for review, if I have any on the shelf, I always reach for the Buffalo Bore first.

    The FNAR is a different rifle, not just another “me too” copy of another military rifle design. It has a unique and reliable gas piston system, is relatively light weight for a rifle of this type and caliber, and I think that the FNAR would prove to be very useful to our troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, in situations where more power is needed than the 5.56mm can provide, but where a rifle that is more portable than the big Barrett .50 caliber can be used effectively.

    For the rest of us, the FNAR is an excellent choice of a semi-auto rifle can reach out and touch a target at long range, with full 7.62 NATO power, and hit those targets with precision. The FNAR is also easy on the shoulder. Even after long sessions on the bench, there was no fatigue. The gas system and stock design very effectively attenuate the recoil of the 7.62 NATO cartridge. The stock is highly adjustable to fit most shooters properly, and the rifle is very easy to shoot well. The FNAR is light enough to serve double duty as a hunting rifle, and is more accurate than most bolt-actions on the market. It balances well, carries well, and shoots well. It is an excellent choice for a main battle rifle to protect the homestead, or as a rifle for gathering meat for the freezer. As I type this, our new President-elect has promised to ban the manufacture and sale of such rifles, so there is no better time to buy one than right now.


    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The FN-AR has plenty of Picatinny rail for attaching sights, flashlights, lasers, etc.





    [​IMG]

    Picatinny rail is plenty long enough to attach a 3Bucc Brass Catcher.


    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Leupold 8.5-25x Mark 4 scope.


    [​IMG]
    FNH 7.62x51 (.308) FNAR Semi-Auto Rifle.



    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Shims to change pitch and cast of stock.



    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Twenty-round magazine.



    [​IMG]
    Long magazine works well with Target Shooting, Inc.'s Model 1000 rifle rest.



    [​IMG][​IMG]
    The FN-AR comes with three interchangeable cheek pieces (top) and three interchangeable butt pads (bottom) to adjust comb height and length of pull.



    [​IMG]
    Butt pads have hard insert to prevent hanging on the shooter's shirt or jacket.



    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Magazine release (top) and bolt release (bottom).



    [​IMG]
    Push-button safety.



    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Sling swivel studs.



    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Medium weight fluted barrel.



    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    Short-stroke gas piston system.



    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Dual hammer springs.



    [​IMG]



    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    When looking for the best accuracy, Jeff reaches for the best ammo available: Buffalo Bore's Sniper .308.

    [​IMG]

    Author's first three shots, fired at 50 yards.


    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    FNH 7.62x51 (.308) FNAR Semi-Auto Rifle
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 29, 2015
  2. RightHand

    RightHand Old Pioneer in a New World Moderator Founding Member

    Interesting. I wouldn't mind looking at one myself. I wonder how it absorbs recoil. I like a couple things about it like the cheekpads and questions a couple other things. Can USGI spec parts be substituted or are the parts proprietary? That wasn't clear from the article. If you decide on one, make sure we get a full report.

    Slightly off topic but.....If using a traditional, non-rail mounting system, Leupold rings are superior because they have the greatest surface contact of most rings available today, Most rings have the greatest surface contact with the top (flat) of the rail whereas Leupold have full surface contact with the vee's. They maintain contact with the top of the rail but the vees are the primary contact while the top is secondary. Surface contact is one of the most important features for all aspect of a good mounting system. Leupolds are more pricy than some others but the precision manufacture is the reason.
     
  3. gunbunny

    gunbunny Never Trust A Bunny

    FNAR parts are mostly proprietary, a few parts might be able to be interchanged with an FN/Browning BAR, but that's asking a lot. The magazine is not interchangeable with anything else.

    Good luck trying to get spare parts from FN!
     
  4. gunbunny

    gunbunny Never Trust A Bunny

    Don't get me wrong, I like the FNAR rifle! I would really like to own one, but every time I think about buying it, I remember what it was like to own other FN rifles.

    I really dislike how FN has to make everything different, even for similiar rifles. They could have easily used FAL or SCAR-H (someday for the civillian market...) magazines to feed this rifle.

    I really despise how FN treats it's customers when it comes to spare parts. It shouldn't break, but if it does, you have to send it back to FN to get it fixed. That's B.S.

    FN makes a good, solid product. I'm sure it can equal the AR-10 in accuracy and ease of use. If those advantages outweigh the customer service issue with you, then by all means get one!
     
  5. RouteClearance

    RouteClearance Monkey+++ Site Supporter


    My DPMS LR 308 can shoot into the .300's in "F" class BR matches with a custom load using Lapua 150gr. Scenar bullets. Granted this level of accuracy is not me shooting, but a fellow benchrester who has over 40 years behind a buttplate, and this is with the factory 416R barrel. Everybody else at our club wonders if this rifle can break into the .200's and compete with the custom bolt rigs, but the barrels made for custom BR rifles can well excede well over a grand in total cost. Which is overkill for my level of accuacy. I'm thrilled if I can occasionaly shoot into the .500's and because of my bad eye's, .500's is the best I will ever do.
     
  6. E.L.

    E.L. Moderator of Lead Moderator Emeritus Founding Member

    I am a long ways out from buying a .308, I have just been seeing these here lately and wondering if anyone had any experience with them. When the time comes I will probably buy another M1A, maybe the Springfield scout. While I have a lot of H&K/G3 magazines, and would maybe buy another if I came across a good one for a great deal, the M1A platform is more comfortable for me. The FN has me intrigued though. Parts availability and magazine cost though are huge considerations. What ever I buy I am going to want to have a minimum of 30-40 magazines for it. This may take a long time for me to accrue, but it is a goal.
     
  7. Al Bundy

    Al Bundy Monkey++

    I'm gonna give this thread a bump. I know its a bit old but not too old. I bought one of the 20" heavy barrel rifles two weeks ago. Here's what I can tell you so far. It is very well built, shooting is so smooth, it sure doesn't kick like a .308, recoil is minimal. Yes the mags are proprietary, I found some here in town for a rip off price of $80 for a 20 rounder. I found some on gungroker $59 shipped. I don't think that's too far out of line for FNH. I own a FNP-40 and the mags for it are $32

    I don't have any glass on it yet, its on order, I ended up getting a Leupold M4 6.5-20x50, Warne QD rings and a CCA bipod. I went out and ran a functional test last weekend. This gun has no sites at all so I wasn't expecting to actually hit anything but at about 100 yards I was in a few feet just sighting down the barrel. It fed flawlessly and everything felt top notch. I think I'll keep it around for a while
     
  8. E.L.

    E.L. Moderator of Lead Moderator Emeritus Founding Member

    Thanks for the post, if you would give us a range report once you get some optics on it. I hope they get the magazine cost down, that is prohibitive.
     
  9. Al Bundy

    Al Bundy Monkey++

    I don't know if any of my shooting ability would be worth posting[lolol] First time owner of a sniper style rifle and thus my shooting ability going to make a perfectly good rifle look like crap. Suggested retail on the mags are $55.00 and the reason people are finding them expensive is because plant can't keep up with demand. Also they are shipping 30,000 more mags to the usa. I've complained to the boyz at FNH about 2 things. One, the case is too damn small, and two, they should come with 3 mags just like their handguns.
     
  10. UGRev

    UGRev Get on with it!

    I haven't shot an FN [anything], but I do own a SOCOM II as well as a Bushy A3 (AR). I love BOTH weapons equally for their purpose. I just recently zero'd my SOCOM at 300yds and it handles 300 yds like butter. I'm sure I could go out to 500 or 600 yds with it and still do nicely. It's a great weapon.
     
survivalmonkey SSL seal        survivalmonkey.com warrant canary
17282WuJHksJ9798f34razfKbPATqTq9E7