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Found in a used bookstore

Discussion in 'Survival Reading Room' started by marlas1too, Jul 25, 2016.

  1. marlas1too

    marlas1too Monkey++

    The Homestead Cookbook
    love this book as it has great things from around the great depression and can still find it online for sale
    get a copy if you can
  2. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    I love old fashion recipes. The older the recipe the less ingredients. People cooked with everyday, what is in your cupboard stuff. A pet peeve of mine is having to run to the store and buy a spice or something to complete a dish. Seems wasteful to me. Depression era recipes are hearty, made with basics. Thanks @marlas1too
  3. Bandit99

    Bandit99 Monkey++

    I still have one recipe that my grandmother gave me from the depression. I think it dates back to the Irish Great Famine, probably before. It is how to make chocolate cake without eggs or expensive ingredients. We were really poor so it got used a lot.
  4. Gray Wolf

    Gray Wolf Monkey+++

    I usually make cornbread, pancakes and waffles without eggs. I'll share my secret. It's flaxseed meal.
    1 tablespoon of it in 3 tablespoons of water for each egg you are replacing. Mix it well, and let it sit 3 minutes before you add it into your mixture.
  5. svjoe

    svjoe Angry Monkey

    This is where the majority of our recipes come from. Originally published.......1969

  6. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Monkey

    I have, what must be, a similar recipe, carried across the Oregon Trail by an ancestor. It's really delicious, super moist. The only thing we've (my grandmother) done to modernize it is to add walnuts, hence our name for it, Crazy Cake!
  7. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    Monkey has a recipe section. a subforum of "back to basics". Please post your crazy cake recipe. Please.
  8. T. Riley

    T. Riley Monkey+++ Site Supporter++

    Mom gave me one when I headed off to college. She was afraid I would starve to death because she hadn't thought me to cook.
  9. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

  10. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

    Motomom34 and marlas1too like this.
  11. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

  12. OldDude49

    OldDude49 Just n old guy

    Ganado likes this.
  13. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    @Gray Wolf thank you for the flax meal how to. I love substitutes. I use them often and find that the recipe is sometimes better.

    My Mom has the same cook book. I used it often when I was growing up.
  14. tc556guy

    tc556guy Monkey++

  15. john316

    john316 Monkey+

  16. DKR

    DKR Interesting ideas, interesting stories

    john316 and Ganado like this.
  17. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    I love these!!! Creative cooks are the best! THey take limited raw goods and make amazing meals thanks guys for posting these!
  18. DKR

    DKR Interesting ideas, interesting stories

    There are, quite literately, dozens and dozens of WWII "cooking with rationing" cook books out there along with raft loads of specific recipes.

    How to Bake By the Ration Book ( mentalfloss.com/.../11-awesome-pages-world-war-ii-ration-cookbooks )

    The Wartime Kitchen: Living of Rations with Ration Book Cooking ..

    Eating for Victory: original Second World War ration recipes
    British Wartime Food: How Britain Fed Itself During World War Two

    It's hard for youngsters in the US today to even imagine just how desperate those times were for the average Brit.

    In 1940, in order to make sure that everyone had enough to eat, the Government introduced food rationing. The average adult’s weekly allowance included 4oz of bacon or ham, 2oz of cheese, one egg, 3 pints of milk, 2oz of tea, 8oz of sugar, 4oz of margarine.

    However, by June 1941, the ration had been almost halved. Householders were also urged to salvage everything, from paper, rags, metal, rubber – and bones, which were washed before you put them out, tied in bundles.

    The inclusion of bones on the above list may seem surprising, even to the most ardent of modern recyclers, but they were boiled down to make glue, which was used in aircraft manufacture, or ground up for use as fertiliser, or made into glycerine for high explosive for shells and bombs.
    It was claimed that a single chop bone weighing 2oz could supply the explosive charge for two rounds of ammunition for RAF Hurricane fighter guns.
    Source (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-1252240/The-food-won-war-The-weird-wonderful-ration-book-dishes-helped-Britain-victory.html#ixzz4NAp50KvE)
    3cyl and Ganado like this.
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