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Freezing Eggs- yes you can

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by Motomom34, Nov 28, 2016.


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  1. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    I stumbled onto information about freezing eggs. Almost all resources say do not freeze them in the shells but you can take the egg from the shell and freeze it whole or separated. When freezing a whole egg, you can scramble them gently (take care to not get air mixed in) then you can pour them in ice cube trays and freeze. Once frozen, remove from the tray and store in a freezer bag. Eggs will be good for one year in the freezer.

    I read that if you scramble to eggs and freeze in an ice cube tray that three egg cubes equal 2 eggs. This is helpful to know if you are using these for baking because this way you can remove only what you need from the freezer bag.

    This happy money saver’s article on freezing eggs is the best that I found. She used muffin tins to freeze her eggs, which is a great idea.


    http://happymoneysaver.com/can-you-freeze-eggs/#_a5y_p=3851963

    Info and tips on freezing eggs-
    Freezing Eggs - Incredible Egg
     
  2. svjoe

    svjoe Angry Monkey

    Pretty damn cool, never knew you could do that?!?!?
     
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  3. runswithdogs

    runswithdogs Monkey+

    1.5 ice cubes = 1 egg?... Those are some freaking tiny eggs!
     
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  4. ghrit

    ghrit Bad company Administrator Founding Member

    How big is an ice cube? These would be LARGE eggs ==
    Onyx Stainless-Steel Ice Cube Tray
    (But that one would leak between compartments. I'd be inclined to look for plastic pushout trays.)
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  5. chelloveck

    chelloveck Shining the light on a truthier truth!

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  6. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    That is an issue because ice cube trays do come in different sizes. I have seen trays that produce cubes that look like little moons but others that look like actual cubes.
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  7. Thunder5Ranch

    Thunder5Ranch Monkey+ Site Supporter+++

    I freeze eggs all the time, and just use the snack size ziplock bags for scrambled and tube bags for unscrambled. The tube bags I sometimes put in hot water and cook the eggs before freezing then just cut them off the tube as I need them. Very much like the McDonalds egg mcmuffin slop but not horrible.
     
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  8. azrancher

    azrancher Monkey +++

    Ah yes you get foam from using a blender to scramble them up... but I'm lazy so I just pour the scram eggs into a pitcher, I have a glass beer pitcher from my deep dark past so I use that, put it in the frig, and wala the next day, no foam...I've used them a year later, but I don't see why they wouldn't last as long as any other frozen meat product, especially if you seal a meal them.

    Rancher
     
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  9. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    What? are you saying you freeze them in the pitcher? Or do you keep the scrambled eggs in the fridge?
     
  10. Cruisin Sloth

    Cruisin Sloth Special & Slow

    IMG_4915.JPG IMG_4907.JPG IMG_4908.JPG IMG_4909.JPG IMG_4910.JPG IMG_4912.JPG IMG_4914.JPG Here the Ms's cracks the egg & separates the white from the yoke plus has them also yoke semi mixed in a swirl using large ice makers for the duck eggs. after all is frozen the get put in freezer bags and marked as chicken white , yoke or hole & the same as duck..
    I took a few pix & I'll upload the way we have built the solar freezers & fridges.
    Sloth
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2016
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  11. azrancher

    azrancher Monkey +++

    Pay attention MM, I said I put in in the frig, i.e. keep it cold, not frozen, and now CS separates the yokes and the whites before freezing.... I guess you could also do that for dehydrating eggs, however that's a whole lot of work.
    I just saw 2 coyotes at dusk so my free range chickens may need a FLIR scope for the .22.

    Rancher
     
  12. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    [ROFL]

    @Cruisin Sloth I have freezer envy. Very organized. Great pictures.
     
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  13. UncleMorgan

    UncleMorgan I eat vegetables. My friends are not vegetables.

    Uncle Morgan has just conducted an exhaustive scientific inquiry and is ready to publish after an extensive monkey-peer review.

    I froze two eggs, just to see what would happen. (For me, that's exhaustive.)

    Running briefly around the internet, I found sites that touted the separation of yokes and whites, freezing in muffin tins, etc.

    I also found a few "grandma did it all the time"s and a lot of people saying whole eggs in the shell should not be frozen because they might ("might") break.

    So what's wrong with broken eggs? You have to break them to use them anyway.

    So I put two eggs in two stainless steel measuring cups, popped them into the freezer and froze them solid.

    (Like a rock, bay-bee!)

    Then I set them in the fridge to thaw overnight.

    The results: One egg did not crack at all. One egg cracked in one place for about 2" length wise, and the crack opened up to about 1/16" at the widest. There was zero leakage associated with the cracking.

    On thawing, the crack closed to the usual hairline width, and one (1) drop of egg white seeped out into the steel cup.

    Both eggs cracked and cooked normally. In fact, they made a jolly good omelet, although I could have cooked them over easy. Both yolks were unbroken.

    So, here's the bottom line: eggs frozen in the shell may crack slightly, but they will not explode like a chicken-laid hand grenade.
    On thawing, leakage will be negligible. Cooking is unaffected.

    Recommendation: Skip the whole strain-and bag-routine. Skip the muffin tins and ziplocks. Skip all that extra work and forego the opportunity for bacterial contamination in the process. Leave the eggs in their little round happy-houses and freeze them whole in the carton.

    BUT: put a layer of plastic wrap down for them to sit on and fold it over them when the carton is full. That way, any slight leakage from cracks during thawing will not stick them to the carton, and it can be reused indefinitely.

    Now, having had breakfast and typed this message, it's time for Second Breakfast.
     
    Motomom34 likes this.
  14. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    I really enjoy @UncleMorgan experiments. But from reading this it sounds like the liquid inside an egg expands when freezing. I think it is a safety thing/ contamination issue with people wanting to remove the egg from the shell. It would be easier to just freeze eggs whole but I had food poisoning once and I didn't enjoy it.
     
  15. UncleMorgan

    UncleMorgan I eat vegetables. My friends are not vegetables.

    Food poisoning is a bummer almost beyond description. I had it once with seafood and almost died. As in 99.99% died.

    Was yours from frozen eggs?

    It's indeed true that the liquids in eggs expand on freezing. With some eggs, that just fills up the air pocket inside, pushing the air out thru the pores in the shell. In others, the shell cracks.

    The important thing, though, is that the cracks are pretty much negligible, and pose no food risk if the eggs are kept frozen until used, thawed in a fridge, and then used the same day they are thawed.

    Which is exactly the same deal as separated eggs, except that whole eggs are not processed in the open, so there is less chance of bacterial contamination.

    But, even with processing, the food risk is small because any bacteria that hop aboard get frozen before they can grow, and then cooked before they can grow after thawing. (Some days being bacteria just sucks!)

    So, like anything else, it really all just comes down to the procedure of preference.

    Say.... I wonder if eggs can be bronzed like baby shoes? (No. No, actually, I don't. In fact, I don't even want to know!)
     
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  16. Cruisin Sloth

    Cruisin Sloth Special & Slow

    Eggs that ARE to be hatched must NOT be washed , they have a protective film that protects the internal embryo but that also breaths .
    Wash them , the hatch has been decreased 50% or more .Also when a mother bird can't make shell from the lack of feed , she will eat all the old shell of eggs past there time but not eat the yoke or white if it has gone off , or just the yoke and the white is left as a blob.
    So the embryo starts up past the heart & lungs as a small 8mm ball in the internal sack and as they drop they get larger (ball is just the yoke) ,as they get mid way the White of all the life neutralists fluid to be left in the egg now is also added in the sack. egg laid now , lets in the following egg & that now starts a one day shell making (so normal birds [not egg layers] will drop every two days) and just at the end of the shelling they have a sack of protection that covers the outside before it leaves the vent.
    real eggs are rough & have pimples or are not perfect , them are the ones we eat . Shell & sacks tossed as like in condoms !
    Sloth

    Edit add , it's the shell & membrane that has the toxic
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2016
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  17. arleigh

    arleigh Goophy monkey

    Dad said they stored eggs in water glass several months to a year. I don't know what that is, but there are those that store them having waxed them or some other covering . Keeping air out is imperative in keeping them safe to eat.
    I have eggs every day and have need had a problem with them even being stored with out refrigeration over a month or more.
    If I must wash them due to chicken poop, then I consume them that morning . but under normal circumstances the natural coating is enough to preserve them quite a while.
    I suspect the those in the store must be washed and there fore require refrigeration.
    I haven't but should try the waxing method ,or similar just to have an alternate method of long term storage . My 14 birds produce more than I consume , and the freezer and fridge are full of other foods as well.
    I hope to be getting some brooders soon so that changes the game a bit more.
     
  18. ghrit

    ghrit Bad company Administrator Founding Member

    Sodium silicate. water glass - Google Search

    and -


    and many more.
     
  19. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

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