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Great Depression Cooking

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by NWViking, Mar 10, 2011.

  1. NWViking

    NWViking Monkey+

    I'm not posting any recipes here, but I wanted to let people know there is a 95 year old woman named Clara who does YouTube videos called "Great Depression Cooking". She shows simple, inexpensive ways to cook meals like they did during the Great Depression. She tells stories about the dpression and the video well produced from her grandson. Check it out and get some inexpensive ideas to stock your pantry.

    TimSuggs, Disciple and IndieMama like this.
  2. RightHand

    RightHand Pioneer in a New World Moderator Founding Member

  3. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

  4. Falcon15

    Falcon15 Falco Peregrinus

    I love Clara, she is a doll! I've picked up a few more pointers from her. She reminds me of my Grandma. =)
  5. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    In the same vein of thought, there are 5 books out on the same topic. "Stories and Recipes of the Great Depression of the 1930's" by Janet Van Amber (Paske). Volumes one thru five. I have all of them except number three. They are an interesting read and give you some excellent ideas. Due to your prompt by posting this thread, I have gone to amazon and ordered volume three just now. Thanks
  6. -06

    -06 Monkey+++

    I have eaten that type of food all my life. Nothing beats dried beans, milky(sawmill)gravy/w/hocake, cornbread milk & onions and of course, kraut. Collards are one of the richest foods available and easily grown in any climate. For us blessed southern folks there is the old staple---grits.
  7. Clyde

    Clyde Jet Set Tourer Administrator Founding Member

    my wife's grandparents at pancakes for most of their meals for over 5 years......needless to say, they never ate them again as long as they lived.
  8. IndieMama

    IndieMama Monkey+

    Thios is wonderful. Thank you!
  9. fireplaceguy

    fireplaceguy Monkey+

    I posted those videos on my blog a couple of years ago. Clara is utterly charming.
  10. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

    RKBA2USA, tacmotusn and NWViking like this.
  11. NWViking

    NWViking Monkey+


    Very good video, thank you for sharing this. I'm off to the Commissary tomorrow and will be picking up some bread making ingredients!

    Thanks again,

  12. CRC

    CRC Survivor of Tidal Waves | RIP 7-24-2015 Moderator Emeritus Founding Member

    Me too.....Only now, they have set up expensive "Soul Food" restaurants, serving what we ate every day...and catering to a clientele with money....People can be so stupid.....

    I remember sitting for the evening meal with my grandmother...and cornbread in milk was what we had....And it wasn't out of economic necessity then....we actually like it! LOL......
  13. Witch Doctor 01

    Witch Doctor 01 Mojo Maker

    My grandmother used to make something called Squinup...(sp) a bread pudding made from leftover biscuits, coffee and whole milk with the butterfat and cream still in it..(i.e. fresh from the cow...) and a little sweetning... tastes great and fills you up...
  14. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    My wife (alaskachick) has this thing about "Fried Cornmeal Mush" that she grew up on.... The stuff is GROSS, but she loves it, with Maple S on it. Me, I'll stick with Minced Ham & Pickles on Bread, with maybe some grated cheese mixed in.
    IndieMama likes this.
  15. Falcon15

    Falcon15 Falco Peregrinus

    As long as those pickles are crisp, I'll join you, BTP - I like sweet pickles with mine, but a good dill mixed in. . . YUM.
  16. RightHand

    RightHand Pioneer in a New World Moderator Founding Member

    It's a darn good thing I'm sitting here with my supper or I'd be drooling on my keyboard
  17. Bug

    Bug Monkey+

    She sure uses a lot of potatoes and onions. We cook from our garden and greenhouse a lot and that really streches the budget. Darrell's family still talks about all the different ways he cooked potatoes when he was a boy. I guess they didn't have much else to eat.
  18. sarawolf

    sarawolf Monkey++

    I like both the corn meal mush and the ham and pickles lol.
    I was taught to cook by my mom who grew up on a small poor diary farm in northern Wis. When I was a kid in the 50's and 60's he finally had 35 cows.
    They collected roe from the rivers and made their own fish sauces. Butchered their own meats, canned, dried and everything else you can think of.
    They were so poor he was selling ALL the milk to the milk plant in the 30's and my uncle ended up with rickets and the doc ordered him to make sure the kids got some of that milk.
    It effected Kurt's legs really bad and made them grow crooked, so at 6 yrs old the doctors broke his legs each in 22 places to straighten them out.
    Very good posts thank you.
  19. TimSuggs

    TimSuggs Monkey+

    An all time favorite of mine is Johnny Nix. Cast Iron and Coal. Now he's slipped the modern equivalent of coal under his pots, but the theory is still the same. One pot, one fire and the results are amazing. For y'all north of the Mason Dixon Line, he's a little hard to understand sometimes if'n you ain't from around these parts, but you'll get the gist of it. Home Page

    Tim Suggs
    Birmingham, AL. USA!
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