Gun control: Cartridge ID law to take effect---California of course

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by stg58, May 18, 2013.


  1. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

    The tower of babel for firearms laws continues building
    ...........................................................
    A hotly contested gun-control law that was passed in 2007 is finally ready to be implemented, Attorney General Kamala Harris said Friday: a requirement that every new semiautomatic handgun contain "micro-stamping" technology that would allow police to trace a weapon from cartridges found at a crime scene.
    The law, signed by then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, made California the first state to require micro-stamping, which engraves the gun's serial number on each cartridge. But the legislation specified that it would take effect only when the technology was available and all private patents had expired.
    The gun owners' group Calguns Foundation tried to forestall the law at one point by paying a $555 fee in an attempt to extend a patent held by the inventor, who wanted it to lapse. Gun manufacturers said the technology was expensive and ineffective, and a National Rifle Association lawyer has threatened a lawsuit.
    But at a Los Angeles news conference Friday, Harris announced that micro-stamping had cleared all technological and patenting hurdles and would be required on newly sold semiautomatics, effective immediately.
    "The patents have been cleared, which means that this very important technology will help us as law enforcement in identifying and locating people who have illegally used firearms," Harris said.
    Attorney Benjamin Van Houten of San Francisco's Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence said the announcement should send a message to other states, the Obama administration and the gun industry that "this is the future and it's really critical to helping law enforcement solve gun crimes."
    Implementation of micro-stamping "moves California to the forefront of the nation in combatting gun crime," said the law's author, former Assemblyman Mike Feuer, D-Los Angeles, who attended the news conference and is running for city attorney.
    C.D. Michel, the NRA's West Coast regional attorney, had a much grimmer prediction.
    "This is not going to help solve crimes," he said. "It's easily defeated, easily wears out and can be used to lead police down false alleys" if the serial numbers are altered.
    Worse yet, Michel said, manufacturers will be unwilling to add this expensive feature to guns sold in a single state, and will instead keep manufacturing weapons for the other states, where demand already far exceeds supply. The effect, he said, would be a ban on new semiautomatic handguns in California, which the NRA will challenge in court.
    Van Houten, in response, said, "The gun lobby makes wild claims about the impact on the California gun market" every time the state enacts a new gun-safety requirement.
    The technology was invented in the 1990s by Todd Lizotte, an engineer and NRA member, who has said for more than a year that he no longer claimed patent rights and wanted California to implement micro-stamping.
    But Harris' office said the state had to wait until it was no longer legally possible for Lizotte to renew his patents.
     
  2. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Who said that would be required on only semi auto? The gun sales market in Kommifornia is about to die, completely.
     
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  3. UGRev

    UGRev Get on with it!

    Defacto bans are illegal : See Heller vs D.C.
    Stamping is retarded. Go ahead.. dump 100 rounds and forget to pick up one brass. You could very well see that at the next crime scene even though you were at your kids baseball game chowing on a burger.
     
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  4. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    I could see a "Booming" business in used brass......both for those who want it, and those who want it back. Shake-downs for range fired brass, and blackmail for anything found at a crime scene. (Or could be dropped at a crime scene) This could so easily be used for bad things.:(
     
  5. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    True. But if the mfrs don't make them, selling will be problematic. Making the connection between a defacto ban and the mfrs refusal to build will be a real chore. It's easy to make the connection when (say) ARs are banned since they are made and sold elsewhere. Not so easy if the product isn't made in the first place.
     
  6. UGRev

    UGRev Get on with it!

    Who makes them? no one.. so as of right now, it's a defacto ban.
     
  7. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

    They will continue to make it difficult to operate by a hodge podge of stupid laws.

    The boys are just waiting to pounce on a few retailers like Centerfire, CTD or John Q. Public mag sales and once they do others will weigh the cost benefit and some will bail on selling mags, ammo and other evil accessories.
    And that is what they want...

    Has anyone purchased a Glock in the last few years? They come with 2 fired casings, soon they will want those casings or others they know are from your firearm under the guise of tracking spent brass at crime scenes.


    No mention of Colorado or Connecticut on the list below

    CENTERFIRE SYSTEMS INC.
    State Magazine Capacity Restrictions

    Listed here are state laws restricting the sale of certain high-capacity magazines. These are state laws, sometimes there are county or city laws with stricter restrictions. It is your responsibility to be or become familiar with local gun laws.

    California: We do not ship, sell, or offer for sale any magazines over 10 rounds to anyone in California or anyone using a billing address in the state of California.

    Hawaii: We do not ship, sell, or offer for sale any magazines over 10 rounds that may fit a handgun to anyone in Hawaii or anyone using a billing address in the state of Hawaii.

    Illinois: We do not ship, sell, or offer for sale any magazines over 12 rounds to anyone in Cook County, IL or anyone using a billing address in Chicago, IL. We do not ship, sell, or offer for sale any magazines over 15 rounds to anyone in Aurora, IL or anyone using a billing address in Aurora, IL.

    Maryland: We do not ship, sell, or offer for sale any magazines over 20 rounds to anyone in Maryland or anyone using a billing address in the state of Maryland.

    Massachusetts: We do not ship, sell, or offer for sale any magazines over 10 rounds to anyone in Massachusetts or anyone using a billing address in the state of Massachusetts.

    New Jersey: We do not ship, sell, or offer for sale any magazines over 15 rounds to anyone in New Jersey or anyone using a billing address in the state of New Jersey.

    New York (entire state): We do not ship, sell, or offer for sale any magazines of any kind to anyone in the state of or city of New York or to anyone using a billing address in the state of or city of New York.

    CENTERFIRE SYSTEMS INC.
    1-800-950-1231
     
  8. Mountainman

    Mountainman Großes Mitglied Site Supporter+++

    According to the article below this is only suppose to effect new or modified designs, at least for now until they include all newly purchased handguns. I am so sick of hearing about Commiefornia anti gun stupidity and how they think they are leading the way for the other states to act. I moved out of there 13 years ago and I would not even go back if I was given a free house to live in!

    "The law doesn't impact the more than 1,200 guns already on the state's official firearm roster. Only new or modified semi-automatic handguns sold in California must be equipped with the technology that "microstamps" a bullet casing with a code identifying a gun's make, model and serial number whenever the gun is fired."
     
  9. VisuTrac

    VisuTrac Ваша мать носит военные ботинки Site Supporter+++

    I'm sure that they are also going to require the Mfg, to ensure that the firing pin/marking mechanism can not be replaced by your average DIY gunsmith .
     
  10. Mountainman

    Mountainman Großes Mitglied Site Supporter+++

    Don't see what they can change with the barrel, firing pin or slide that would make it so hard to replace or modify. They all have to move, except the barrel, for the gun to operate so they should all be able to be removed and replaced. Of course it will be a felony to possess the replacement parts or modify it.
     
    VisuTrac likes this.
  11. I think the state of New York and Maryland have been doing mandatory ballistic fingerprinting on new guns sold for many years. More junk science. I don't know which is sketchier junk science, micro-stamping or ballistic fingerprinting.
     
  12. Harbin

    Harbin Monkey+

    Just one more reason to add to an already long list of why i haven't looked back since moving 2 years ago.

    Not that i agree with the law, sounds like more libtard thinking to me. In the end, it will make little to no difference. Is like to see the idiots that signed this go into the worst parts of LA to enforce it.
     
    Mountainman likes this.
  13. NotSoSneaky

    NotSoSneaky former supporter

    That's the point. hissyfit

    It's just a "reasonable restriction" right ? </sarcasm> NO!!
     
  14. -06

    -06 Monkey+++

    Methinks acquiring 5 or 10 rounds extra would be prudent before they start in earnest.
     
  15. natshare

    natshare Monkey+

    This is the type of law you get, when the idiots writing the laws have ZERO knowledge or experience with firearms. Much like King Andy Cuomo's 7-round magazine limit (there's still no companies that manufacture 7-round mags for firearms that can also utilize 10-round or higher capacity magazines). Much like the lady politician in Colorado, who made a law that says you cannot have more than 15 rounds in a magazine, nor can you have a magazine that is capable of being modified to carry more than 15 rounds. :eek: Yeah, that counts for a ton of weapons magazines, doesn't it?

    Ballistic fingerprinting? Easy solution. Walk into a gun store, buy a new barrel for your pistol. Pay cash. Utilize the weapon with the new barrel, which won't be in their database of ballistics, will it? Once again, DUMB.

    Microstamping? Brass catcher. Better yet, revolver with speed loaders. If you've ever watched competitive shooters that use revolvers, you realize that they can reload just as quickly as you can replace a magazine.

    So long as we continue to allow morons with no common sense or knowledge to write laws about things they're ignorant of, we'll continue to get the same result. Stupid, ineffective, intolerant, and unconsitutional laws. :mad:
     
  16. bfayer

    bfayer Keeper Of The Faith

    This is all about keeping guns out if the hands of the average Joe.

    Do they really think dirtbags can't figure out how to remove the micro stamp, of course they know the dirt bags will figure it out, for God sakes they figured out how to make crystal meth in a coke bottle using a battery and draino.

    The goal is to reduce the number of guns that can be sold in CA, not to help solve crimes.
     
  17. Icefoot

    Icefoot Monkey+

    How about pressuring the gun manufacturers to refuse sales to law enforcement of guns and accessories not allowed in the hands of civilians? Only sell LE the guns civilians are allowed to have. Manufacturer policy of an out of state producer. See how long the laws stand. Or how long LE can maintain order.
     
    Mountainman likes this.
  18. bfayer

    bfayer Keeper Of The Faith

    I support this approach. However, the Glocks and Sigs of the world would not sign on, because in their twisted European minds, its the police that they make the guns for.

    Their executives in Europe can't figure out why we let our civilians in the U.S. buy them to begin with.
     
  19. QUOTE: "... I support this approach. However, the Glocks and Sigs of the world would not sign on, because in their twisted European minds, its the police that they make the guns for.

    Their executives in Europe can't figure out why we let our civilians in the U.S. buy them to begin with..."

    --------------------------------

    Perhaps we need a Glock boycott. It supposedly worked with Smith & Wesson many years ago when they stepped out of line.
     
  20. bfayer

    bfayer Keeper Of The Faith

    [quote="BushcrafterAnthony, post: 269601, Perhaps we need a Glock boycott. It supposedly worked with Smith & Wesson many years ago when they stepped out of line.[/quote]

    I already do :). But the point of my post was that Glock could not care less, their #1 customer is law enforcement, and they could give a rats behind about the second amendment.

    If they had to choose between selling to civilians or selling to LE agencies, who do you think would win?

    Now if we put pressure on our local politicians not to buy from companies that don't support the 2nd amendment (the real intent, not Biden's twisted version), then we could start to make a dent.

    Local legislators have significant pull on how local money is spent.

    We can make this work if we all stock together.
     
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