Have You Been Chipped Already And If Not- When?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Yard Dart, Mar 26, 2013.


  1. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/privacy/privacy_advcom_12-2006_rpt_RFID.pdf

    As I was doing some further reading on the subject of RFID tracking of humans and micro implants used for that I ran across a lot of information relating to the above document originally drafted in Dec. 2006.
    Many have been concerned with the requirement in Barry's health care bill that we would be required to get this implant- false (see link).
    snopes.com: Obamacare Requires Microchip Implantation?

    The current technology being used for medical purposes is tied back to the initial development of RFID tracking device implants to a company called Verichip.
    VeriChip - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Interesting aspect that you will see following is the RFID implants are being used for medical purposes but part of the ownership for VeriChip was: Applied Digital Solutions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    They were purchased by PositiveID Corporation™

    Today they are using the RFID implant for medical purposes as approved by the FDA .
    Millions of people around the world have been implanted with chips to provide information for medical facilities, during surgery procedures. The patient has to sign the approval forms at this time but when does that become mandatory. When does the .gov start to use the technology perfected in the medical community on the citizenry at large? When do they incorporate the use of GPS technology to track and the RFID to identify you at a checkpoint? They have been using RFID on vehicles registered with the border patrol for frequent crossing's of a particular vehicle of the border to track them. Embedding the citizens is one of the steps they have been researching and developing for years- they are close to this being a reality to what end?
    I say this is not tin-foil but reality, what say you?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 20, 2014
  2. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

    This would be an "after tremor" technology, meaning it wouldn't even be applicable until long after the citizens have been wholly disarmed and made completely dependent upon the system. At this point in time, worrying about an RFID chip would be the least of my worries --but it is an issue to bear in mind. Naturally, the corporate establishment (that's government, too) would love to stick a tracker in every meat suit. But, will it ever happen?
     
  3. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    That is the question- but in the mean time they are working out the technical side of it.
     
    Mindgrinder and Brokor like this.
  4. DMGoddess

    DMGoddess Monkey+

    Okay, this is starting to remind me of 'Demolition Man'. That creeps me out.
     
    Mindgrinder, Yard Dart and Brokor like this.
  5. NotSoSneaky

    NotSoSneaky former supporter

    Have I ? No.

    Will I ?
    Over my dead body, after they pry the red hot smoking gun from my cold dead hands and wade through the pile of dead bodies. Same goes for any of my family.
     
  6. Mindgrinder

    Mindgrinder Karma Pirate Ninja Jedi Bipolar WINNING M.L.F.

    Got a smart phone?
    Bank card?
    Credit card?
    Loyalty card?
    On-Star enabled?
     
  7. NotSoSneaky

    NotSoSneaky former supporter

    Anyone notice how they are made so one cannot remove the battery ?

    The next three are point-of-use and can also track whet you have bought.
    On-Star is another beast altogether, no freaking way will I ever own a vehicle with that or anything similar installed. If you so much as miss a payment they can (and will) shut your car off until you pay up.
     
    Mindgrinder likes this.
  8. fedorthedog

    fedorthedog Monkey++

    If they start this it will be with registered sex offenders then convicted violent felons. After they prove it is "safe" they will go after the population for medical reasons.
     
    Mindgrinder likes this.
  9. toydoc

    toydoc Monkey++

    What about all the lists that, even we monkeys are bound to be on, for people that do not "tow" the .gov line? Oh, and have you talked to anyone who has gone to the sandbox lately?
     
    Mindgrinder likes this.
  10. STANGF150

    STANGF150 Knowledge Seeker

    Yeah i HAD an rfid chipped credit card. Called & raised hell about it. They sent me a regular card to replace it.
     
    Mindgrinder and JABECmfg like this.
  11. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    This is what I've always thought and have posted here elsewhere. No need to chip me when my iPhone with camera(s) and GPS is on me 24/7
     
    Yard Dart and Mindgrinder like this.
  12. Mindgrinder

    Mindgrinder Karma Pirate Ninja Jedi Bipolar WINNING M.L.F.

    Bah - it's far worse than most think.

    Andrew Weissmann: FBI wants real-time Gmail, Dropbox spying power.

    Despite the pervasiveness of law enforcement surveillance of digital communication, the FBI still has a difficult time monitoring Gmail, Google Voice, and Dropbox in real time. But that may change soon, because the bureau says it has made gaining more powers to wiretap all forms of Internet conversation and cloud storage a “top priority” this year.

    Last week, during a talk for the American Bar Association in Washington, D.C., FBI general counsel Andrew Weissmann discussed some of the pressing surveillance and national security issues facing the bureau. He gave a few updates on the FBI’s efforts to address what it calls the “going dark” problem—how the rise in popularity of email and social networks has stifled its ability to monitor communications as they are being transmitted. It’s no secret that under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the feds can easily obtain archive copies of emails. When it comes to spying on emails or Gchat in real time, however, it’s a different story.

    That’s because a 1994 surveillance law called the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act only allows the government to force Internet providers and phone companies to install surveillance equipment within their networks. But it doesn’t cover email, cloud services, or online chat providers like Skype. Weissmann said that the FBI wants the power to mandate real-time surveillance of everything from Dropbox and online games (“the chat feature in Scrabble”) to Gmail and Google Voice. “Those communications are being used for criminal conversations,” he said.

    While it is true that CALEA can only be used to compel Internet and phone providers to build in surveillance capabilities into their networks, the feds do have some existing powers to request surveillance of other services. Authorities can use a “Title III” order under the “Wiretap Act” to ask email and online chat providers furnish the government with “technical assistance necessary to accomplish the interception.” However, the FBI claims this is not sufficient because mandating that providers help with “technical assistance” is not the same thing as forcing them to “effectuate” a wiretap. In 2011, then-FBI general counsel Valerie Caproni—Weissmann’s predecessor—stated that Title III orders did not provide the bureau with an "effective lever" to "encourage providers" to set up live surveillance quickly and efficiently. In other words, the FBI believes it doesn’t have enough power under current legislation to strong-arm companies into providing real-time wiretaps of communications.

    Because Gmail is sent between a user’s computer and Google’s servers using SSL encryption, for instance, the FBI can’t intercept it as it is flowing across networks and relies on the company to provide it with access. Google spokesman Chris Gaither hinted that it is already possible for the company to set up live surveillance under some circumstances. “CALEA doesn't apply to Gmail but an order under the Wiretap Act may,” Gaither told me in an email. “At some point we may expand our transparency report to cover this topic in more depth, but until then I'm not able to provide additional information.”

    Either way, the FBI is not happy with the current arrangement and is on a crusade for more surveillance authority. According to Weissmann, the bureau is working with “members of intelligence community” to craft a proposal for new Internet spy powers as “a top priority this year.” Citing security concerns, he declined to reveal any specifics. “It's a very hard thing to talk about publicly,” he said, though acknowledged that “it's something that there should be a public debate about.”
     
    Yard Dart likes this.
  13. Mindgrinder

    Mindgrinder Karma Pirate Ninja Jedi Bipolar WINNING M.L.F.

    Oh they're working it out all right...

    http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/05n0510/05n-0510-EC6-Attach-1.pdf

    Based on the SCRM data system, we have developed inexpensive methods for facilitated
    monitoring of the use of medications by patients for their physicians. Combined with
    encoding of pills to associate them with a specific prescription, monitoring provides a
    powerful additional check limiting diversion, detecting patterns of early addiction or
    covert experimentation with the patient’s medicines by others, such as children.
    The SCRM system addresses the following problems:
    1. Product authentication: Secure Coding and a novel Pill Print (digital visual
    capture process) at the point of manufacture achieve the most rapid and powerful
    counterfeit detection system for the bartered unit, the individual pill. This
    capability is synergistic to RFID authentication of a container or package. Note
    that authentication of the container alone may create a false sense of security
    regarding the integrity of pills within. The SCRM systems are well designed to
    frustrate even sophisticated counterfeiters who wish to erase, paint over, duplicate
    or clone a chemical additive, or inactivate a traditional RFID device
    2. Country of origin determination: Through relational data basing, the securely
    encoded serial number identifies production site PharmoRx White Paper - Augmenting RFID Track and Trace Page: 3
    3. Lot or batch tracking to patient, MD: Because our systems include postprescription traceability, listing of every patient and his physician who received a
    particular lot of medication is instantly available
    4. Deterrence of illicit resale: Patients are told that their medicines contain markers
    which implicate them if found on the street or within an overdosed patient; loss of
    further medication or criminal prosecution are powerful deterrents to diversion
    5. MD prescription abuse: MDs know that the tracking serial number, through
    registration to a prescription number at the pharmacy, identifies them, their
    patients and the size of their prescriptions
    6. Fraud and theft of pills : When pills are reported stolen, registration data lead to
    the exact serial number on pills; these pills are not lost in the universe of
    medication but become forensic evidence of a fraudulent claim. Recognizable as
    stolen property, the diverted pills lose value
    7. Abuse of medication: Facilitated monitoring detects early overuse of pills or
    removal of pills from a compliant patient’s container (e.g., by a child); a poison
    pill strategy in our biometric dispensers destroys pills after inappropriate attempts
    to open; two of our patent pending formulations of opioids inactivate the agonist
    if the pill matrix is breached
    8. Non-adherence to MD prescription: The failure to take prescribed medications
    (the converse of abuse) leads to worsening illness, hospitalization, morbidity and
    greatly increased health costs; monitoring and controlled dispensing immediately
    identify omitted doses, a critical aid to chronic disease management
    9. Wasteful prescribing, inefficient use of medications: Through coding, registration
    and monitoring, every pill enters an inventory of medications dispensed until
    consumed by the patient- prescribing of excessive medication, costly to the
    health care system and a path to experimentation and abuse, is easily detected
    10. Liability reduction for manufacturer, distributor, prescriber: Powerful, cost
    effective systems curtail diversion and theft while providing an appropriate,
    flexible dose for the intended patient
    11.Cost effectiveness: SCRM implementation utilizing optical inscription on tablets
    added less than 2 cents to the cost of a $3-4 specialized opioid; SCRM-PAK
    secure repackaging of abusable drugs is installed for less than 0.5 cents/pill
     
    Yard Dart likes this.
  14. Mindgrinder

    Mindgrinder Karma Pirate Ninja Jedi Bipolar WINNING M.L.F.

  15. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    I buy my Viagra from India.
    :)
     
  16. Mindgrinder

    Mindgrinder Karma Pirate Ninja Jedi Bipolar WINNING M.L.F.

    Um...
    It might be cheaper to just install some railings on your bed to stop you from rolling off in your sleep.
     
  17. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    A good freind of mine going thru cancer treatment was injected with the Verichip yesterday..... his wife and him are not happy.... They said he had to get it so they could provide the best treatment...they felt like they were boxed in and had to do it...

    AntiChips: FAQ on VeriChip, VeriMed
     
    Mindgrinder likes this.
  18. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    There is a word for that. It's called "NO". Commonly used in phrases such as "NO f#@king way"," I said NO and I meant it", and usually followed by the phrase, "try it, and I will sue you" and "Give me back my money," or "You will be hearing from my Lawyer".:(
     
  19. NotSoSneaky

    NotSoSneaky former supporter

    On Star does not need to be "enabled", it can be turned on remotely at any time. You can be traced without consent for marketing promotions, track maintenance problems, listen to your private conversations or evaluate your driving habits for insurance purposes.

    On Star and other devices can also shut down your car if you miss a payment.

    Not that any of this would ever be abused. [eek3]
     
  20. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    The easy way to disable OnStar, is to chop off the Cellular Antenna Cable at the Black Box... No Cellular Antenna, no OnStar...
     
  1. Yard Dart
  2. svjoe
  3. Yard Dart
  4. Yard Dart
  5. DarkLight
  6. TI.Proof
  7. Yard Dart
  8. Yard Dart
  9. Yard Dart
  10. Dont
  11. sec_monkey
  12. Yard Dart
  13. Garand69
  14. stg58
  15. Garand69
  16. Legion489
  17. Kingfish
  18. GrayGhost
    Thread

    Question.....

    Do we have freedom of speech today?
    Thread by: GrayGhost, Jan 27, 2016, 43 replies, in forum: Freedom and Liberty
  19. Motomom34
  20. Legion489
survivalmonkey SSL seal        survivalmonkey.com warrant canary
17282WuJHksJ9798f34razfKbPATqTq9E7