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Health Benefits of Honey

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by Motomom34, Nov 24, 2015.

  1. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    Saw a list, 50 Health Benefits of Honey, after reading the list a couple of times I was not convinced of the 50. One issue is they had some benefits that almost seemed dangerous. Another reason the 50 uses was questioned was because some of the uses were listed twice IMO. I have posted the 50 uses below but I think I will focus on a simpler list instead. More realistic and to the point, not looking for a big number of uses but to list what is beneficial.

    Health Benefits of Honey

    To soften raw honey, my preferred method is below. People have different a way of softening honey, I like the method I use because IMO there is a lesser chance of over-heating.

    Here’s how to do it without degrading the natural benefits of the raw honey:

    Bring a deep pot of water to a boil — use one like this
    You will need to use a deep pot so when you place the jar inside the water comes up high on the jar
    Remove pot from heat source after the water is boiling
    Place jar of honey into water and let it sit in the pot, uncovered so pressure doesn’t build up
    Stir as the honey softens
    Replace lid onto jar and store at room temp

    ** your honey should stay soft for at least a month. Please do not heat your honey in the microwave or above 105 degrees because it kills the good stuff.

    50 Health Benefits of Honey
    Honey : Top 50 Uses of Honey

    Please note- there is some information in here that is disputed. Two on the list I have **** because I am not sure. I have always heard NOT to give babies fresh honey. I never did and in no way am I promoting. Second asterisk is regarding diabetics. I am not diabetic, thus that is something I cannot say yes or no to. The above ^^^^ is an example of everything written on the web is not fact. Do your research, check then double check.

    #5 & 47 seem to contradict in my opinion. I have added honey to my in the morning and never felt sleepy. I will try it before bed some evening and report back. I have read do not put honey on burns because it makes the burn hurt, yet I have read put honey on burns to health heal the wound. I use coconut oil & aloe on burns so I will not be experimenting with honey on burns. The rest of the list seems harmless to a point.

  2. Pax Mentis

    Pax Mentis Philosopher King Site Supporter

    I have used honey on burns...it won't help the pain in the least, but will keep some burns that would normally blister from doing so. It also guards against infection.
    kellory, Motomom34, Ganado and 2 others like this.
  3. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

  4. Hanzo

    Hanzo Monkey+++

    We like local honey too. In fact, from my understanding from a beekeeper, the anti allergy benefits are greater the closer the honey made to where you are. The closest hives are within two miles of us as the crow flies. But other local honeys taste better (at least to me).
  5. pearlselby

    pearlselby Monkey++

    You know @Motomom34, my hand (knuckle) stopped hurting when I started taking honey and vinegar everyday. I did not realize that did it. Thank you very much!!!

    We also always but local, @stg58!!
    Motomom34 likes this.
  6. Tikka

    Tikka Monkey+++

    Raw, unpasteurized, organic vinegar offers many benefits and a little local honey helps hide the taste. :)
    Motomom34 likes this.
  7. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    I have not tried this and I dont see how it works but its interesting

    A Must Try ‘Age Elixir’ : This Miraculous Elixir Will Keep You Young[​IMG]
    Ageing is an inherent and integral part of our life cycle, a natural process that every single living organism, and indeed, every living cell goes through. Yet, is there is a natural way to erase at least some of the consequences of the passing years, it would be more than welcome.

    This article will present an amazing elixir by an oncologist, which will help you look vibrant, healthy, and young. Tibetan medicine recognizes this mixture as an elixir which successfully slows the aging process. Furthermore, this recipe is successfully included in treatments of the most dangerous diseases in today’s world.

    Since these ingredients are easily available and cheap, and its preparation is simple and quick, do not hesitate to try this recipe!

    Age Elixir- Recipe


    • 2.2 lbs / 1 kg of organic honey

    • 10 cloves of garlic

    • Juice of 10 lemons
    Method of preparation:

    Chop the garlic cloves finely and mix them with honey and lemon juice. Transfer the resulting mixture in a clean glass jar and let it stand for 8-10 days.


    After the required period of time has passed, your miraculous elixir is ready. Take 1 teaspoon of the remedy early in the morning on an empty stomach and another one before your last meal.
    Motomom34 likes this.
  8. Airtime

    Airtime Monkey+++ Site Supporter

    I think a lot of the alleged benefits of honey In those lists are dubious at best. For example, honey is mostly sugar, unlikely adding significant quantities to one's diet would cause weight loss.

    As a bee keeper, what I do know with reasonable confidence are the following:

    1. Honey is mostly sugar and consequently is hygroscopic (absorbs moisture). If not excessively diluted, it works as a topical anti-biotic as most sugars do. It works by sucking the moisture out of the bacteria, so note, it is similar to putting Neosporin on an infected cut. It will not work like amoxicillin for something like a sinus infection if you eat a tablespoon several times a day. I suppose if you eat and drink nothing to dilute it, honey might have some efficacy against the helico bactor bacteria common to many stomach ulsers but I am quite skeptical.

    2. Honey is mostly condensed flower nectar and in the process of collecting that, bees will collect pollen as well. They generally transport that in pouches on their legs but a small amount, along with some enzymes in their mouths will mix with the nectar/honey which they basically transport in their stomachs. Anyone who has gone through allergy shots to build up a tolerance to various allergens knows the process is to expose your body to low levels of the allergen(s) on a regular basis (mine were every 3-10 days) gradually building to higher doses. Honey that contains nectar and pollen from plants in the area a person lives can accomplish a similar process building one's tolerances to the plants in the area that triggers their seasonal allergies. The closer the producing hive is to the area a person lives and works, the more likely it will contain the nectar and pollens from the offending plant to which one is allergic. The allergen levels in honey are pretty low so a modest amount consumed on a regular basis will yield the best results. If you are allergic to other things like cats, dogs, dust mites, etc., don't expect honey to do very much.

    3. This use is totally anecdotal and I have no statistical proof. I have had troubles with a nerve condition called trigeminal neuralgia which can be excruciatingly painful (look up "suicide disease"). The treatments can be more debilitating than the condition. I have tried various meds with mediocre to no success. My doctor has another patient with type 1 TN far worse than mine (more the type 2 or atypical TN) and nothing was working. Somehow, that guy started taking honey, like a pound or more per week and eventually got maybe 90% relief after suffering for years and years. My doc recommended I try that as well. In a couple months my TN settled down quite a bit but while I think the honey helped, I can't say for certain it was responsible and maybe some of the other meds coincidently settled it down. The nice thing is unless you have a honey alergy, it won't hurt you to try it for most anything, well... as long as you don't eschew other available treatments that would help, especially if time is of the essence (like with infections).

    kellory, Motomom34 and Ganado like this.
  9. Tikka

    Tikka Monkey+++

    It makes the vinegar taste better, ;)
    Airtime and Ganado like this.
  10. Airtime

    Airtime Monkey+++ Site Supporter

    Yep! Makes a lot of things including cheap whiskey taste better. Makes some things taste absolutely wonderful (good baclava comes to mind).
    Ganado likes this.
  11. Tikka

    Tikka Monkey+++

    Making cheap whiskey taste better is definitely a keeper.

    IMO. with Baclava, honey is required and I don't care if it makes my fingers sticky.
    Motomom34, Airtime and Ganado like this.
  12. daisymiles

    daisymiles Monkey

    Interesting post! Would love to know more about honey benefits.
    Motomom34 likes this.
  13. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    @Airtime nice post on honey! Do you know how to measure honey weight?
    1 cup of honey = how many lbs? or oz?
    1 gallon of honey = ? lbs
  14. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    A very general rule of thumb that applies to just about anything, most of the time. Should work for honey.
    "A pint is a pound, the world around."
    Brokor and Ganado like this.
  15. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    I thought honey was heavier for some reason.

    THe only reason I ask is most large herbal recipes are done in lbs not cups or pints
  16. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    I don't think the density of honey is dramatically different from water, dunno for sure. The viscosity sure makes it seem that way tho'. FWIW I use that thumb rule rather often, and it works, from flour to gin and sliced peaches.

    You can check by taking a 1 lb (net) can of anything, empty it, fill it with water and pour it into a measuring cup. The difference, if any, won't matter in a cooking situation. (Might not push that rule when it comes to gunpowder --)
    Tracy likes this.
  17. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    I found some honey weight 1.5 pound per pint

    weight of honey

    but I wanted to see what @Airtime said since he is a bee keeper
  18. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    OK, I'll defer.
    Ganado likes this.
  19. Airtime

    Airtime Monkey+++ Site Supporter

    Honey is mostly sugar; glucose and fructose. The water content varies and is around 15-16% plus or minus a percent or two. That results in a density of roughly 1.37 to 1.42. So a gallon of water weighs 8.34 pounds at room temperature and consequently honey will be roughly 11.43 to 11.84 pounds per gallon.

    kellory, Ganado and Motomom34 like this.
  20. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

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