Help fixing freezer Gasket?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by BailyTheFox, Dec 10, 2015.


  1. BailyTheFox

    BailyTheFox Monkey

    hey guys, I just need some tips on fixing my mini freezer so it doesn't have a layer of frost in it. The gasket on the door is really loose and I was wondering how I could reseal it properly without buying a new one? heres some pics. I have 100% silicon right now that I could use to re-stick the gasket, would that work? Any tips are welcome.

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  2. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    If the gasket is still resilient, you don't need to glue it in. Take a sheet of paper and run it around the seating area (with the door closed( and see if it slides easily or drags. If it drags, you are good to go with nothing. If the gasket material is stiff, or the paper slides easily, it's time for new. But please clean off that mold, and defrost it a little more often.
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  3. BailyTheFox

    BailyTheFox Monkey

    I just got the freezer and the layer of frost is the first i've seen of it and came fast, not human food in there btw. All frozen chicks and mice. by seating area you mean where the door closes?
     
  4. chelloveck

    chelloveck Diabolus Causidicus

    Good to know....should I ever be a guest at your abode, I'll remember not to snack attack that freezer for microwavable munchies. ;)
     
  5. Homer Simpson

    Homer Simpson Monkey

    You say that you just got the freezer, so it is used, that might be the reason it was gotten rid of. You will find that on most freezers the gasket is screwed to the door, just peel back from the inside and look for screws. My experience is that most failed gaskets that are not visibly torn, are torn around the screws where you can't see. You can try various methods to glue a reinforcement around where the screw goes through the gasket but success is varied. I have epoxied pieces of plastic milk jug and gotten a few more months at times. Gaskets are available online but can be expensive.

    The paper trick above is a good method to find the loose or leaky spot. Gaskets can be patched, but the energy savings of a good sealing gasket may be worth it.
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  6. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    If it were me, I would dismount the seal (screws) and clean it well in fairly hot water. Some seals are just compression, and some have magnets in the edge, so test it with a piece of ferris metal. If it is magnetic, a good cleaning, may be all it needs, and the bath may restore a bit of the elasticity.
    When reinstalling, I would use the original holes, but check for tearing or warping at the screw holes, and add thin washers to spread out the footprint of the screws.(makes if hold better), and defiantly clean the surfaces. It doesn't matter what is stored in it, clean surfaces mate better.
     
  7. BailyTheFox

    BailyTheFox Monkey

    What is ferris metal? I'll do what you suggested here I think and of course clean it when I do, Ive been in such a confusing place lately I just said screw it I'll clean it later to be honest. The gasket doesn't seem stiff or brittle anywhere so I think your suggestion should work. Would siliconeing the gasket as well as using the screws and washers be wise? I could put a line of silicone all around the underside of the gasket to anchor it down even more. Thanks for the tips dude, I'll definitely do this once I find a place to store my lizard food. I got this freezer for 40$ and ima make it work dammit!!! *shakes fist*

    Thanks very much everyone, you guys are awesome as always!
     
  8. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Ferrous, typo. Iron bearing, like any steel.
     
  9. BailyTheFox

    BailyTheFox Monkey

    Ah okay, thanks dude.
     
  10. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Ferrous metal is anything magnets will stick to. (Iron, steel, tin, ...) Silicone in a light bead would not hurt, between seal and door, but let it fully dry before freezing again.
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  11. BailyTheFox

    BailyTheFox Monkey

    Yup will do
     
  12. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Incomplete answer. Stainless steels contain iron, and some of them are magnetic, some are not.
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  13. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    True enough, but I'd your intension is to test for a magnet, then it makes sense to test with something you would expect a magnet to stick to. Well water may contain iron, but I would not try using water to test for a magnet.
     
  14. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Going by those pix, see the paint and a little rust and know. Stainless will not be painted, most times.
     
  15. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Apparently, you don't know what I'm talking about. Nor do I see anything to this back and forth that helps the lady with her seal issue.
    Some doors close from spring loaded hinges, some suck tight with vacuum, and some have magnetic seals like these.[​IMG]
    Some have more than one.(my freezer door has both magnetic and vacuum, and I've added a closer to make sure it seals). 1449989082230-915539570.
    To test for a magnetic seal, just grab a paperclip and see if it is drawn to the seal.
    (That is all my comment was meant to bring about, a simple test.)
    It is very possible, that a spring loaded hinge could be screwed to the door and body of the freezer, and put more pressure on the seal if it is passive. [​IMG]
    I was just looking to see what type of seal it is.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2015
    chelloveck likes this.
  16. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Quite possible. Also quite possible that something got left out of the description. (That door closer idea isn't so bad.)
     
  17. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    It came about from having kids. Send one to the freezer for something, and find it later with the door ajar and food soft. They SWEAR they closed the door, slammed it even (there's the problem).
    When any door is closed on a enclosed space, air pressure will not let it close completely, until the air has moved out of the way. The closer was replaced on the screen door due to the hold open clip wearing out, so this one got repurposed to pull the door tight. It will also hold the door open for loading.
     
  18. fedorthedog

    fedorthedog Monkey++

    I have seen expanding foam used to re expand the seal. Make a small hole and inject the foam inside the collapsible part of the seal. Be careful not to over do it the stuff really expands. I would only use this as a last resort but it does work on car door seals too.
     
    Ganado likes this.
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