Mesquite Tree Usage

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by HK_User, Apr 10, 2016.


  1. HK_User

    HK_User A Productive Monkey is a Happy Monkey Site Supporter

    Mesquite Trees

    To recap and better explain the life cycle of Mesquite as a compost material.

    1. Only living Mesquites should be harvested for a compost material.
    Reason, Agent Orange was used in your area until sometime in the early 80s by ranchers and many of those stands are still in place as dead trees.

    2. Harvest only the limbs, shred the limbs and leave in place on the surface, add grass clippings or other nitrogen if available. In 6 months or so when all the surface insects have reduced most of the wood to holes or sawdust then use as a mulch or compost.

    3. Never use the trunks unless they are shredded to a pulp. The trunks have an ability to resist rot and bug infestation when left above the surface and even below the surface they still resist absorbing water and bugs. I suppose it is a natural preservative and toxin which combines.

    Later today I will provide pictures of the two pieces of a stump that I cut down after it was dead and in place for 3 or more years. The two pieces were then moved to a ravine, left in the muck and shade to rot. Now, setting in the Front End Loader Bucket, you will see that they are in fine shape for their age. I just retrieved the Mesquite pieces and will section them for knife scales. The Burl will also be harvested soon for more Mesquite trinkets.

    Mesquite Log in the Bucket 1

    Mesquite Log in the Bucket 1.JPG

    Mesquite Log in the Bucket 2

    Mesquite Log in the Bucket 2.JPG

    Mesquite Log Split not washed

    Mesquite Log Split before washing 1.JPG

    Mesquite Log That has been on the ground several years

    Mesquite Log with Saw  Several Years on the Ground 1.JPG

    Mesquite Log That has been on the ground several years with bug holes.

    Mesquite Log with Saw  Several Years on the Ground 2.JPG

    Mesquite Logs in the Bucket
    Mesquite Logs in the Bucket.JPG

    Mesquite Log Split Showing water retention but no rot after 6 months in the water.
    Mesquite Logs Split 1.JPG

    Mesquite Log Split Showing water retention but no rot after 6 months in the water2

    Mesquite Logs Split and Washed 1.JPG

    Mesquite Logs Splite after being washed 1.JPG

    Mesquite Log Split Showing water retention but no rot after 6 months in the water 3.

    Mesquite Logs Splite Showing the Water Retained but no Rot 1.JPG

    The spot the logs lay for 6 months.

    Mesquite Logs were here in the mud and water 1.JPG

    Stump the Logs were cut from. No Rot after 4 years.

    Mesquite Stump.JPG

    Mesquite Trees can be used in the same way as most Hard Wood Trees.

    Knife scales are but one.

    I am in the process of redoing a WESTERN Bowie into a more balanced design and the project will carry some of the wood you see above.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2016
  2. Dunerunner

    Dunerunner Monkey

    Great info on the Mesquite. Wonder how much of it ends up as or in charcoal??
     
  3. Bishop

    Bishop Monkey+

    Man that make one awesome slingshot or knife handle.
     
  4. HK_User

    HK_User A Productive Monkey is a Happy Monkey Site Supporter

    If I was going to build a new place and wanted a proper mantle I would use the large tree now laying on the ground. I figure it may have a few worm holes but the inside should be a beaut!
    It could also be a coffee table or a side board for the right home.
    Or a curved seat on a porch.
     
    Ganado likes this.
  5. HK_User

    HK_User A Productive Monkey is a Happy Monkey Site Supporter

    I would have to say about 95% is used for BBQ, usually just the wood.

    In the very early days of Texas the Spanish Missions had Mesquite Wood floors. Because there was a type of Mesquite which grew straight and made good planks for flooring.

    Over cutting destroyed the source although Texas A&M had a project at one time trying to find seeds from a few trees to start up a Tree Farm of tall Mesquites. I had one such tree but it died before I could harvest any seeds.
     
    Ganado likes this.
  6. Tikka

    Tikka Monkey+++

    Years ago Herter's used Mesquite for rifle stocks.

     
    Ganado and HK_User like this.
  7. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    Nice Post @HK_User Thank you! I really appreciate the info
     
    kellory likes this.
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