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Modern wheat a "perfect, chronic poison," doctor says

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by tulianr, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. tulianr

    tulianr Don Quixote de la Monkey


    (CBS News) Modern wheat is a "perfect, chronic poison," according to Dr. William Davis, a cardiologist who has published a book all about the world's most popular grain.
    Davis said that the wheat we eat these days isn't the wheat your grandma had: "It's an 18-inch tall plant created by genetic research in the '60s and '70s," he said on "CBS This Morning." "This thing has many new features nobody told you about, such as there's a new protein in this thing called gliadin. It's not gluten. I'm not addressing people with gluten sensitivities and celiac disease. I'm talking about everybody else because everybody else is susceptible to the gliadin protein that is an opiate. This thing binds into the opiate receptors in your brain and in most people stimulates appetite, such that we consume 440 more calories per day, 365 days per year."
    Asked if the farming industry could change back to the grain it formerly produced, Davis said it could, but it would not be economically feasible because it yields less per acre. However, Davis said a movement has begun with people turning away from wheat - and dropping substantial weight.
    "If three people lost eight pounds, big deal," he said. "But we're seeing hundreds of thousands of people losing 30, 80, 150 pounds. Diabetics become no longer diabetic; people with arthritis having dramatic relief. People losing leg swelling, acid reflux, irritable bowel syndrome, depression, and on and on every day."
    To avoid these wheat-oriented products, Davis suggests eating "real food," such as avocados, olives, olive oil, meats, and vegetables. "(It's) the stuff that is least likely to have been changed by agribusiness," he said. "Certainly not grains. When I say grains, of course, over 90 percent of all grains we eat will be wheat, it's not barley... or flax. It's going to be wheat.
    "It's really a wheat issue."
    Some health resources, such as the Mayo Clinic, advocate a more balanced diet that does include wheat. But Davis said on "CTM" they're just offering a poor alternative.
    "All that literature says is to replace something bad, white enriched products with something less bad, whole grains, and there's an apparent health benefit - 'Let's eat a whole bunch of less bad things.' So I take...unfiltered cigarettes and replace with Salem filtered cigarettes, you should smoke the Salems. That's the logic of nutrition, it's a deeply flawed logic. What if I take it to the next level, and we say, 'Let's eliminate all grains,' what happens then?
    "That's when you see, not improvements in health, that's when you see transformations in health."
  2. UGRev

    UGRev Get on with it!

    All these years of thinking it was carb shock after eating a sub or 2 slices of pizza.. I'd be sitting at my desk and practically falling asleep.. can't think.. can't function. FUCK YOU MONSANTO!!! FUCK YOU UP THE ASS WITH A WIRE-BRUSH!!
    Seawolf1090, Harbin and CaboWabo5150 like this.
  3. ditch witch

    ditch witch resident bacon hoarder Site Supporter+

    I was attending a public funds seminar back in the spring and this one lady behind me kept yammering endlessly about how she'd given up all wheat in her diet to anyone within earshot. She'd pull out a snack and tell us all how it didn't have wheat in it, and when it was lunch time she made a big show of asking the waiter (who had no effin clue) if the sauce on the chicken had wheat in it. By the fourth day I was ready to shove a big wheat roll down her throat to shut her up. Anyway, I couldn't help but notice that over a dozen people commented on how much weight she'd lost. Apparently just by getting the wheat out of her diet she'd dropped 44 pounds and it was still coming off.

    Makes ya wonder.
    oldawg and tulianr like this.
  4. CaboWabo5150

    CaboWabo5150 Lost in the woods

    When can we finally charge Monsanto with the hundreds of millions of counts of murder, and hundreds of millions of counts of attempted murder that they have coming to them ??
    Georgia_Boy likes this.
  5. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    You pays your money and takes your choice. Not particularly defending Monsanto, but the trade off in this case seems to be eating poison or starving since the chemicals and genetic "improvements" enable much greater production, thus increased population.
  6. CaboWabo5150

    CaboWabo5150 Lost in the woods

    True enough.. But it seems as though many of their "improvements" go out of their way to knowingly line their pockets at the expense of people's health. And only they and their scientists know how unhealthy it is. Seems a bit evil.. I've got nothing against anybody lining their pockets. I hope to do it myself a little someday. -- Also, I wouldn't mind seeing a little cutting back on the increased population part, but that's a whole 'nuther topic.
  7. UGRev

    UGRev Get on with it!

    With the minor exception of "WE DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT IT" until 30 years later..
  8. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    True. Didn't mention it because it's pretty plain. Also true of many things man has done to himself over time, more's the pity that homo sapiens doesn't do well with precognition or prognostication. I honestly can't say that Monsanto didn't do enough research before marketing a product that would do mankind (in general) and farmers (in specific) some good. There are a number of epic fails on humankind's record, thinking here of thalidomide and agent orange as pretty good examples of how man has stomped on his own (_________parts and pieces____.)
    tulianr likes this.
  9. Hazmat54

    Hazmat54 Monkey+

    The change in wheat was long before the 60's and 70's. No genetic modification, just old time cross breeding and such. 1920's, 30's, and 40's. The 'Amber Waves of Grain' were several feet tall with small seed heads. They got knocked down easily by weather. That made them hard for machines to harvest. 'Wheat Belly' is a good book to read on the subject. Unintended Consequence
    and all.
    tulianr likes this.
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