Moose Facts

Discussion in 'Turf and Surf Hunting and Fishing' started by Mortimer Adler Moose, Sep 17, 2012.


  1. Domestication

    Domestication of moose was investigated in the Soviet Union before World War II. Early experiments were inconclusive, but with the creation of a moose farm at Pechora-Ilych Nature Reserve in 1949 a small-scale moose domestication program was started, involving attempts at selective breeding of animals based on their behavioural characteristics. Since 1963, the programme has continued atKostroma Moose Farm, which had a herd of 33 tame moose as of 2003. Although at this stage the farm is not expected to be a profit-making enterprise, it obtains some income from the sale of moose milk and from visiting tourist groups. Its main value, however, is seen in the opportunities it offers for the research in the physiology and behaviour of the moose, as well as in the insights it provides into the general principles of animal domestication.
    In Sweden there was a debate in the late 18th century about the national value of using the moose as a domestic animal. Among other things, the moose was proposed to be used in postal distribution, and there was a suggestion to develop a moose-mounted cavalry. Such proposals remained unimplemented, mainly because the extensive hunting for moose nearly drove it to extinction[86] and because of moose aggressiveness during the rutting period.
    Aggression

    Moose are not usually aggressive towards humans, but can be provoked or frightened to behave with aggression. In terms of raw numbers, they attack more people than bears and wolves combined, but usually with only minor consequences. When harassed or startled by people or in the presence of a dog, moose may charge. Also, as with bears or any wild animal, moose that have become habituated to being fed by people may act aggressively when denied food. During the fall mating season, bull moose may be aggressive toward humans due to the high hormone levels they experience. Cows with young calves are very protective and will attack humans who come too close, especially if they come between mother and calf. Unlike other dangerous animals, moose are not territorial, and do not view humans as food, and will therefore usually not pursue humans if they simply run away.[56] Like any wild animal, moose are unpredictable and should be given a respectful amount of space.
    Studies suggest that the calls made by female moose during the rut not only call the males but can actually induce a bull to invade another bull's harem and fight for control of it. This in turn means that the cow moose has at least a small degree of control over which bulls she mates with.[57]
    Moose often show aggression to other animals as well; especially predators. Bears are common predators of moose calves and, rarely, adults. Alaskan moose have been reported to successfully fend off attacks from black bears, brown bears and grizzlies. Moose have been known to stomp attacking wolves, which makes them less preferred as prey to the wolves. Moose are fully capable of killing bears and wolves. A moose of either sex that is confronted by danger may let out a loud roar, more resembling that of a predator than a prey animal. European moose are often more aggressive than North American moose, such as the moose in Sweden, which often become very agitated at the sight of a predator. However, like all ungulates known to attack predators, the more aggressive individuals are always darker in color.[58]
    Social structure and reproduction

    Moose are mostly diurnal. They are generally solitary with the strongest bonds between mother and calf. Although moose rarely gather in groups, there may be several in close proximity during the mating season.
    Mating occurs in September and October. The males are polygamous and will seek several females to breed with. During this times both sexes will call to each other. Males produce heavy grunting sounds that can be heard from up to 500 meters away, while females produce wail-like sounds.[53] Males will fight for access to females. They either assess which is larger, with the smaller bull retreating, or they may engage in battles, usually only involving the antlers.
    Female moose have an eight-month gestation period, usually bearing one calf, or twins if food is plentiful,[54] in May or June.[55]Newborn moose have fur with a reddish hue in contrast to the brown appearance of an adult. The young will stay with the mother until just before the next young are born. The life span of an average moose is about 15–25 years.
    Size and weight

    170px-Moose_crossing_river_in_yellowstone.
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    Crossing a river
    On average, an adult moose stands 1.4–2.1 m (4.6–6.9 ft) high at the shoulder, which is more than a foot higher than the next largest deer on average, the Elk.[48] Males (or "bulls") weigh 380–700 kg (840–1,500 lb) and females (or "cows") typically weigh 200–360 kg (440–790 lb).[49] The head-and-body length is 2.4–3.2 m (7.9–10 ft), with the vestigal tail adding only a further 5–12 cm (2.0–4.7 in).[50] The largest of all the races is the Alaskan subspecies (A. a. gigas), which can stand over 2.1 m (7 ft) at the shoulder, has a span across the antlers of 1.8 m (6 ft) and averages 634.5 kg (1,396 lbs) in males and 478 kg (1,052 lbs) in females.[51] Typically, however, the antlers of a mature bull are between 1.2 m (3.9 ft) and 1.5 m (4.9 ft). The largest confirmed size for this species was a bull shot at the Yukon River in September 1897 that weighed 820 kg (1,800 lb) and measured 2.33 m (7.6 ft) high at the shoulder.[52] Behind only the bison, the Moose is the second largest land animal in both North America and Europe.
    Antlers

    The male's antlers grow as cylindrical beams projecting on each side of the head at right angles to the midline of the skull, and then fork. The lower prong of this fork may be either simple, or divided into two or three tines, with some flattening.
    In the North Siberian elk (A. a. bedfordiae), the posterior division of the main fork divides into three tines, with no distinct flattening. In the common elk (A. a. alces) this branch usually expands into a broad palmation, with one large tine at the base, and a number of smaller snags on the free border. There is, however, a Scandinavian breed of the common elk in which the antlers are simpler and recall those of the East Siberian animals.
    The palmation appears to be more marked in North American moose (A. a. americanus) than in the typical Scandinavian elk.
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    Young female (A. a. americana) inAlgonquin Park in early June
    The male will drop its antlers after the mating season and conserve energy for the winter. A new set of antlers will then regrow in the spring. Antlers take three to five months to fully develop, making them one of the fastest growing animal organs. They initially have a layer of skin, called "velvet," which is shed once the antlers become fully grown. Immature bulls may not shed their antlers for the winter, but retain them until the following spring.
    If a bull moose is castrated, either by accidental or chemical means, he will quickly shed his current set of antlers and then immediately begin to grow a new set of misshapen and deformed antlers that he will wear the rest of his life without ever shedding again. The distinctive looking appendages (often referred to as "devil's antlers") are the source of several myths and legends among many groups of Inuit as well as several other tribes of indigenous peoples of North America.[46]
    In extremely rare circumstances a cow moose may grow antlers. This is usually attributed to a hormone imbalance.[47]
    Diet

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    [​IMG]
    Bull moose, eating a fireweed plant
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    Bull moose browses beaver pond near Grand Tetons
    The moose is a herbivore and is capable of consuming many types of plant or fruit. The average adult moose needs to consume 9770 Calories per day to maintain its body weight.[41] Much of a moose's energy is derived from terrestrial vegetation, mainly consisting of forbs and other non-grasses, and fresh shoots from trees such as willow and birch. These plants are rather low in sodium, and moose generally need to consume a good quantity of aquatic plants. While much lower in energy, these plants provide the moose with its sodium requirements, and as much as half of their diet usually consists of aquatic plant life.[42] In winter, moose are often drawn to roadways, to lick salt that is used as a snow and ice melter.[43] A typical moose, weighing 360 kilograms, can eat up to 32 kg of food per day.[42]
    Moose lack upper front teeth, but have eight sharp incisors on the lower jaw. They also have a tough tongue, lips and gums, which aid in the eating of woody vegetation. Moose have six pairs of molars and, ahead of those, six pairs of premolars, to grind up their food. A moose's diet often depends on its location, but they seem to prefer the new growths from deciduous trees such as white birch, trembling aspen and striped maple, among many others. Many aquatic plants include lilies and pondweed.[44] Moose are excellent swimmers and are known to wade into water to eat aquatic plants. In non polar regions this trait serves a second purpose in cooling down the moose on summer days and ridding itself of black flies. Moose are thus attracted to marshes and river banks during warmer months as both provide suitable vegetation to eat and water to wet themselves in. Moose have been known to dive underwater to reach plants on lake bottoms, and the complex snout may assist the moose in this type of feeding. Moose are the only deer that are capable of feeding underwater.[45]
    The moose (North America) or Eurasian elk (Europe) (Alces alces) is the largest extantspecies in the deer family. Moose are distinguished by the palmate antlers of the males; other members of the family have antlers with a dendritic ("twig-like") configuration. Moose typically inhabit boreal and mixed deciduous forests of the Northern Hemisphere in temperateto subarctic climates. Moose used to have a much wider range but hunting and other human activities greatly reduced it over the years. Moose have been re-introduced to some of their former habitats. Their diet consists of both terrestrial and aquatic vegetation. The most common moose predators are wolves, bears, and humans. Unlike most other deer species, moose are solitary animals and do not form herds. Although generally slow-moving and sedentary, moose can become aggressive and move surprisingly fast if angered or startled. Their mating season in the autumn can lead to spectacular fights between males competing for the right to mate with a particular female.
    170px-Moose_crossing_river_in_yellowstone. 170px-Moose_crossing_river_in_yellowstone.
     
    RightHand likes this.
  2. VisuTrac

    VisuTrac Ваша мать носит военные ботинки Site Supporter+++

    Mort, you forgot all the ticks.
    Dude, nearly half of winter kill is due to the number of ticks that Meeses carry.
     
  3. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    Mongo want to know. Moose meat good as fat Bear?
     
  4. VisuTrac

    VisuTrac Ваша мать носит военные ботинки Site Supporter+++

    Moose = venison
    Bear = well, bear jerky and roasts were good, I'm still not convinced an omnivore tastes better than a vegetarian.

    Just my opinion.
    I've heard rumor that there is Moose helper in Alaska, but I've not heard of bear helper. just sayin.
     
    RightHand likes this.
  5. Just to let you know - this Moose will be staying outta your neck of the woods! I've already got BT Post's number and I'm adding you two to my list.
     
  6. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Eat more grass, fart like cow.
     
  7. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    Mongo... Moose = tasty animal.... Mooseburger Helper is a staple in the Land of the Midnite Sun... Moose Jerky, and Moose Stew are big around the Supper Table... Moose is lean.... Bear is Greasy, and tastes like rotten fish in the fall.... Fall Bear is only for very poor Hunters....
    Say your cousin, yesterday Mort.... He is look'en good... Better Text him, and tell him Moose Season is OPEN, NOW.....
     
  8. VisuTrac

    VisuTrac Ваша мать носит военные ботинки Site Supporter+++

    Mort, your safe here until TSHTF. No moose season in my AO.

    But Post-SHTF. all bets are off. Nice big moose like you will feed and cloth many for a good long time.

    I prefer eating female vegetarians though. Just sayin'
     
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