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Pallet Shed/Shelter

Discussion in 'Off Grid Living' started by bmysliwiec, Feb 1, 2016.

  1. bmysliwiec

    bmysliwiec Monkey

    Alright so I am building a small 8x8 pallet shed, its just basic 4x4 pallets, 2 tall 2 deep 2 wide. I am using cheap metal roofing. The whole thing will run me about $200 to build. But I am going to add a starter kit from Renogy Solar to it, its a 50 watt system so I figure I can put the panel on the roof and put the inverter & charge controller in the shed. One battery should be fine. It can charge my batteries for my dewalt tools during the day and the battery backup can help power led lighting for the night.

    Right now its purpose will be a shed, but the reason I decided on 8x8 is it can fit in the back of my trailer. Heavy as all crap of course but we can tilt it and put it on rollers to get it in and out. I figure although I will live in my dome tent from vital domes I can use this as a backup shelter or perhaps a chicken coop or something. And of course if we bug in then it cna just stay on the property for a million uses.

    I will get it built once the snow is gone in a month or two, just getting supplies gathered now, I will post pictures once I get it up.
  2. chelloveck

    chelloveck Diabolus Causidicus

    Adding some insulation might improve comfort if using it as emergency accommodation; and it may reduce your feed costs somewhat, if using it as a chicken coop.

    Adding some guttering and down piping will help in harvesting water for a water butt or water tank.

    I am in the process of planning to do the same thing, but am looking to do it as a prefabricated modular kit that can be transported disassembled; erected on site with non-powered tools ; and when necessary, disassembled (*with non-powered and transported to alternative locations as required.

    Using hardwood pallets:


    They make for a more solid, sturdier construction,
    Their strength enable them to withstand greater weight loadings,
    More termite resistant than soft wood pallets;
    Have a longer service life than softwood pallets;

    Heavier to move,
    Harder to construct with, using non-powered hand tools,
    May need heavier duty fixings and other kinds of reinforcement.
    Using softwood pallets ;

    much the same as the opposite of hardwood pallets
    Consider using a combination of hardwood and softwood pallets in your construction as best suits their respective advantages.

    Consider plastic pallets as an option. Definitely termite proof! Won't rot, (though may become brittle if not UV resistant), no probs with rising damp,


    Plastic Pallets as foundation?

    Repurposing plastic pallets

    Edit: As your AO seems to experience winter snowfall, you'll need a fairly steeply pitched roof to slough off any accumulated snow.
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2016
    Gnarly, Mindgrinder and Dunerunner like this.
  3. duane

    duane Monkey++

    Played around some with portable buildings, my domes leaked unless I covered them with a solid canvas, Can make them insulated and with windows and bolt either triangles or hexagons and they make nice portable short time use buildings. Tipee's using Labon, sp,design are beautiful and friends have lived winters in a couple of 16 foot diameter ones with liners, one caught fire and burned in a very short time, second was stolen while they were in town for less than 4 hours, poles were there but cover was gone. Canvas not quite as fireproof as buffalo hide. Poles can be sourced locally, but are heavy, long, and difficult to move. Greenhouses are light, easy to put up, not too expensive and last several years. They are hot in the summer, cold in the winter, and are a very pleasant, if not very practical solution. As I have said before, the best solution I found was sections of 2 by 4 framed, plywood skinned, insulated panels, that had overlaps that fastened one section to the next with screws and a cordless screwdriver, walls to the floor, and roof to the walls and the removal of the screws lets you disassemble it. Not real cheap, but warm in winter, cool in summer, a good usable space, stack flat on a trailer, go up very quickly, use readily available plywood, doors,, windows, insulation, and roofing and hide well as they look like just like another small shed. Unlike pallet, they are 4' by8' module and although they are more expensive, you can rapidly build a 16' by 24' structure that is quite usable for a "tiny house". Here in New England the best examples are all of the "Amish built" sheds that they build and have trucked all over.
    chelloveck likes this.
  4. hitchcock4

    hitchcock4 Monkey

    chelloveck likes this.
  5. bmysliwiec

    bmysliwiec Monkey

    Thats some great suggestions, I will be incorporating the water ideas for sure. I am going to do a blog with it when I get it going - Building from Scraps complete with video, pictures and step by step instructions. I will try to remember to come back and post updates on this thread once I start
    chelloveck likes this.
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