Raising Pigs/UPDATE HAVE PIGLETS

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by Kathy in WV, Jul 6, 2014.


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  1. Kathy in WV

    Kathy in WV Just runnin' the ridges...

    20140625_192512~2. Probably the easiest livestock we've ever raised in all our years of living this lifestyle. The Large Black Hog. Super intelligent animals, don't have many health issues, convert everything to body mass, not aggressive to work with usually. Just don't pass out in the pen or they may see you as the next meal, lol. I just wanted to expose people to the idea of raising old world types of livestock to keep their genetic diversity going before its lost forever. here are less than 1000 breeding animals left in the United States today.
     
  2. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    The large Black Hog is definitely a handsome looking hog. The picture immediately put an earwig chant in my head from the dog treat commercial. .... BACON! BACON! I WANT BACON. Do you sell stock to potential breeders?
     
  3. Kathy in WV

    Kathy in WV Just runnin' the ridges...

    Tac... that is the plan, as well as selling unregistered feeder piglets. Not quite to the selling stage yet but getting there. I will have unregistered stock possibly born as soon as late August. They will be purebred but not registerable due to the breeder not knowing which one of his boars bred the gilt. The registry is super particular about the details.
    Sooo... long story short I went and bought a registered boar from a good breeder in VA. He isn't quite 3 months old yet so won't be breeding well for probably at least 6 months.

    And yes, the LB hogs are known for their fabulous bacon as well as marbled meat that resembles a good steak. I can't wait to fill my own freezer this Fall!
     
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  4. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Good luck with your venture. But make sure they don't get loose. Boar destroy the habitat for nearly everything else game wise. That is why the Division of Wildlife want them eradicated.
    I hunt them, but have not found one yet, here in Ohio (small numbers here) but places like Texas are being overrun. They are BEGGING hunters to come and take their fill for free.
    I DO have a motorized rotisserie waiting for my first pig though....:D
     
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  5. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    I hope you don't find out the hard way, but that fence won't even slow one down if it wants out. Disclaimer: I don't and never have raised pigs, but a guy that worked for me back in the day did. About twice a year, he had to take a day off to chase down the escapees. He used timber to build his fences that looked like they could stop a humvee, and with a couple strands of electric fence in between.

    IIRC, someplace here on the forum, Monkeyman posted a tutorial on hog butchering. I strongly suspect you already know how, but just in case --

    And how I do luvs me bacon. Hereby, I volunteer to be a taste tester.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2014
  6. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    I am not a purist. I know it would not help to continue the breed, but not being registered is no deterrent to me. I will look down here for Black Hog stock. Heritage breeds interest me mostly due to the quality meat on the table. I would be a fool not to recognize that as an excellent breed. I had read about them before and I know they are slower to put on weight than the Big Agri hogs. I can actually trap feral hogs down here in many many places and take all I want. In fact in some cases they will terminate your right to trap hogs on their property if you intentionally release any you have caught.
     
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  7. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    A good hot wire will help keep them in the pen area to some degree, it appears that is what Kathy is using for the perimeter. But if you get a predator inside or nearby, the pig will easily run thru the electric fending just as a horse will in distress.

    Back when we had pigs we used a hot wire set inside the pen and on the back side of the same post we had a heavy guage square type fence buried about a foot or two as supplemental stoppage. But regardless we would have breakouts once or twice a year as well. It was always a point of the pig just hopping up on the fence and crushing it down.... they are smart critters... and delicious.
     
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  8. VisuTrac

    VisuTrac Ваша мать носит военные ботинки Site Supporter+++

    Hot wire at base of post (anti rooting) with 3" offset, 2nd wire at 14", and hog panels
    Happy piggies stay inside.

    Oh and the key to happy piggies is lots of room to pasture.

    bored piggies in a small enclosure more likely to attempt break out.

    Give them shade, sun, shelter, water and a tree to scratch up against. Oh, and a kiddie pool. Them suckers love kiddie pools.
     
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  9. Kathy in WV

    Kathy in WV Just runnin' the ridges...

    Oh yeah, I think I'd rather face a mad bull than a mad hog! But you would really not believe the gentleness of this breed in general. Train your breeders from the day you get them. Handle every day, feed well, keep them happy, train them with a feed bucket to follow you. They enjoy being scratched and will come flop down at your feet for belly rubs... quite social.

    We don't have a wild boar issue in this area, at least not yet. I'm sure as the wild ones migrate we will have the problem eventually. WV is nearly all woods and farms, about perfect for any hog. As mentioned above, a hog wanting out will get out. Not a big deal if they are used to being grained. My gilts got out last week and my son just called them and shook the bucket... came right back. Make sure to go ahead and feed them if you got them back in with a bucket. If not you won't get them next time.

    My whole purpose with this thread is to get people to preserve the genetic diversity still there. Whether its Large Blacks, Red Wattles, or Old Spots, its all worth preserving. Especially now with the PEDv virus wiping out entire breeding farms. We should all be keeping a few pigs if possible.
     
  10. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Your link has an error message. As for wild boar.....ALL wild boar in this country are excapees and their descendants. They are not indigenous to the united states, and were brought by settlers. They can all crossbreed. Russian boar, and domestic pigs, and pigs can go feral very fast. It IS a big deal if they get loose. And no matter how gentle they are today, they can and DO eat human beings. (The Mob has been know for some time to feed people they want to disappear to pigs!) The only way to know if a pig has eaten a human is with a DNA test.
    People believe alligators are good pets too, until the day they loose a hand.
    Pigs ARE smart, and can be trained, but never trust one. They can be deadly.
     
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  11. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

  12. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Correct. "The requested attachment could not be found"
     
  13. Kathy in WV

    Kathy in WV Just runnin' the ridges...

    Kellory, re-read my first post...it says they will eat you! Blacks can often grow to #1000 lbs, which is why we scratch them with the business end of a hoe! Any livestock has the potential to hurt you. Horses kill more people per year than hogs ever will, yet we all continue to ride. You just have to be vigilant and aware. Hubby had a run in with the bull while ago and I'm surprised he doesn't have him gutted and hanging in the barn for an all nighter. (Happy not to be cutting meat all night). Im really excited about this business venture and love working with all the stock here, but being excited doesn't mean Im naive or reckless. We could get killed working with our pigs, cattle, horses, mules, etc... or I could get hit by a car crossing the street. Ya gotta live life or just sit on the sidelines.... We live!
     
  14. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    I read it thoughly. All I'm saying is be careful. Never think of them as tame, and don't let them get loose. And good luck with the venture.
     
  15. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    As a young teenager, I had a pig that used to trouble me often. I began to carry a thick stick into the pen every time I had to feed, break ice or whatever chores where needed. One day I was breaking ice in the half, 50 gallon barrel of water....in the deep of winter in Montana (that means axe to ice, fun stuff). Anyways this ole boy come up behind me and grabbed the pant leg and started to drag me... like I was dinner. I had my stick in hand and clubbed old boy across the noggin.. and he went down.. The next thought out of my head was dad was going to be really mad that I killed his prized pig...... later on when he got home and I told him the story, he went out, killed the pig and butchered him up. Once a pig shows intent, time to make him bacon as dad said.... I will follow that guidance to this day.
     
  16. Kathy in WV

    Kathy in WV Just runnin' the ridges...

    Kellory, I didn't mean what I said in a rude way so don't be offended. It just seems like my entire life has been spent having men pat me on the head and telling me a girl can't do that. I guess it kind of bothers me, but I think you just felt you needed to warn me so thank you. I do like them, I feed them and scratch them, but its rare that I go in their field, and never alone.

    We farm full time so its rare we don't know where the animals are. So far, they have always followed the grain bucket to where we need them. Knock on wood. The 16 yr old is responsible for checking fencelines and letting his dad know where its weak.

    What I worry most about is having to notch ears on day old piglets. Any advice on that? The LBHA insists on notching of ears. No tattooing or tagging or branding. How do you keep a 600# sow from eating you alive when her baby screams?
     
  17. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    No offense taken.

    I do not raise pigs, but faced with that problem, I could restrain momma first. Then notch junior.
    Were it me, I would use a catchpole (noose on a pole) to tie off one leg of momma to a fence pole or barn timber. Tie off with a quick release knot, and once done with all piglets, pull the knot release from beyond the fence or stall wall.
    I would not approach again until momma had assured herself that all was well.
     
  18. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    Good luck with that..... [OO] please make a video and post showing you doing this method...please.....:lol:
     
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  19. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Which part of "I do not raise pigs" do I need to spell slower? ;) it IS a method I would try ( might go off an overhead beam or branch) if you have a better method, (as Ross Perot said) I'M ALL EARS.;)
     
  20. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++


    Now just imagine 600 lbs. of anger running like that.... with you being dragged around with a catch pole.... :D

    I would isolate the sow in another steel type pen for safety before I tried to notch the piglets.....
     
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