Silicon Bakeware

Discussion in 'Off Grid Living' started by MountainMariner, May 14, 2015.


  1. MountainMariner

    MountainMariner Clearly Ambiguous

    Just wondering how well silicon bakeware cleans up? If I can save on water usage it might well be worthwhile. All my water is either from melted snow in the winter or my 110 gallon water catchment system in the summer. (Also have lake and stream water available but that requires a bit of a hike there and back)
     
    BTPost likes this.
  2. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    You have to get the grease build up off of silicone or the non stick part goes away and everything sticks. I use baking soda and a bit of water on the tough bits but stay I use hot water and dawn dw liquid... Never tried waterless cleaning
     
    Motomom34 likes this.
  3. MountainMariner

    MountainMariner Clearly Ambiguous

    I'll still use some water but cleaning some of my baking pans uses way more water than I'd like to.
     
  4. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    Truthfully I never knew there was silicone bakeware. I do have a few silicone utensils that are holding up nicely. I have never had an issue with sticking. I wet them, scrub it with the scrubber and rinse. There are easy to clean in my opinion. I just looked the cookware up and it said no greasing needed.
     
  5. RightHand

    RightHand Pioneer in a New World Moderator Founding Member

    I think there is probably a fat content in most things that are baked in the silicone and that would leave a greasy residue. I would probably try wiping them down with vinegar or a scrub with vinegar and baking soda. Just a little water required for final rinsing.
     
    Ganado and Motomom34 like this.
  6. Seacowboys

    Seacowboys Senior Member Founding Member

    Tracy likes this.
  7. RightHand

    RightHand Pioneer in a New World Moderator Founding Member

    You're opening a door that is probably best left closed LOL
     
  8. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    I think vinegar on silicone deteriorates the silicone.... Use baking soda paste for greasy bits. And motomom34 is right you do not need to grease silicone but food does have oil in it so the get baked on Greece build up. Most of the time I just wipe mine out
     
  9. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    [ROFL]That is so wrong. LOL! Another fun fact by @Seacowboys
     
  10. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    My logical mind tells me this is sensible... Silicone cooking at its easiest... But my emotional and physical just is completely grossed out. Thanks for that brain imprint sea monkey =) I'm brain fried!
     
  11. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    "cbreynolds10 months ago
    Things You'll Need...
    Grease cutting liquid dish soap (Dawn, Palmolive)
    Non-abrasive scrub brush (plastic/nylon bristles)
    Baking soda

    Instructions...

    Wash the silicone bakeware with a grease-cutting liquid dish soap, hot water and a non-abrasive scrub brush. Apply light pressure as you scrub in a tight circular motion.

    Rinse the silicone bakeware and feel for the areas that still have a sticky film.

    Generously pour baking soda onto the surfaces of the silicone bakeware that have a sticky film. The baking soda should be 1/4-inch thick on all sticky areas.

    Gently scrub the baking soda into the surface of the silicone bakeware using the still wet non-abrassive scrub brush to create a paste.

    Allow the baking soda paste to remain on the surface of the silicone bakeware for a couple hours or more to completely dry.

    Rewash the silicone bakeware with a grease-cutting liquid dish soap, hot water and a non-abrasive scrub brush to remove the dried-on paste.

    Rinse the silicone bakeware and feel for any areas that still have a sticky film. Proceed with additional applications of the baking soda paste until the silicone bakeware comes completely clean."

    What's the Best Way to Clean Silicone Bakeware? — Good Questions | The Kitchn
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  12. RightHand

    RightHand Pioneer in a New World Moderator Founding Member

    All that washing and rinsing seems to defeat the original dilemma of water usage
     
  13. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Then perhaps, it is the wrong product for the existing circumstances.
     
  14. RightHand

    RightHand Pioneer in a New World Moderator Founding Member

    I think you're right. I personally would go for cast iron; easy to clean and maintain.
     
  15. MountainMariner

    MountainMariner Clearly Ambiguous

    Agreed. I need to add some pieces to my cast iron set. Sorry silicon.
     
  16. RightHand

    RightHand Pioneer in a New World Moderator Founding Member

    Wise decision MM. I usually just wipe the cast iron clean then put it back on the heat to kill any germs.
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  17. Gator 45/70

    Gator 45/70 Monkey+++

    Works fine, Thanks'

    First cast 007 (800x600).

    First cast 012 (1024x768).
     
    chelloveck, kellory and Ganado like this.
  18. MountainMariner

    MountainMariner Clearly Ambiguous

    Exactly as I do. Wipe the cast iron then throw it back onto flame to kill the nasties, wipe again with a tablespoon or two of oil and hang it up for the next go round.
     
    Ganado, chelloveck, Motomom34 and 2 others like this.
  19. MountainMariner

    MountainMariner Clearly Ambiguous

    Already have a lead ingot mold. Isn't most silicon cookware rated at 550 degrees or so???? My lead cast is a bit hotter than that...
     
  20. Gator 45/70

    Gator 45/70 Monkey+++

    I push things a bit, Only pour half a compartment at a time, Good for 300# or so.
     
    chelloveck likes this.
survivalmonkey SSL seal        survivalmonkey.com warrant canary
17282WuJHksJ9798f34razfKbPATqTq9E7