Storing Canned goods

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by Ganado, Sep 4, 2015.


  1. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    I found this the other day and think it's great storage for tin canned goods. I wish I had something similar for canned (in glass) a system that auto rotates. Right now I just have ever thing on shelves.
    [​IMG]

    Does anyone have a good way to store canned goods?
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2015
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  2. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    That is a very simple design. It would be simple to build, and easy to scale for other cylindrical containers. Any questions, PM me, and I'll walk you through it.

    Edit: I doubt glass would be a good idea, stored like this, but any size can good could be, easily.
     
  3. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    @kellory that is my problem I can't figure out how to store glassware. This won't work for glass. I'm just looking for better way to store food once I can it.

    Lol @Tobit not my stash ;)
     
  4. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    It is an easy project to build. That would be a great solution for extra storage in a narrow room or hallway.

    For glass mason jars, you could create a wall box type solution....I will try to find an example.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Just a few ideas.... :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2015
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  5. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    I like that, but for some reason I can not "like" it.
    Your post can not be found.
     
  6. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    Pretty. I guess instead of having all my shelves in one side I could have them made for both sides.
     
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  7. T. Riley

    T. Riley Monkey+++ Site Supporter++

    I made these in 2007 from cardboard, toothpicks and hot glue and they are just as solid today. Link below.
    I added the toothpicks for reinforcement.

    image.
    Hold 15 cans each.

    How to Build Your Own Can Rotating Rack
     
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  8. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    Lol love that @T.Riley
     
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  9. Airtime

    Airtime Monkey+++ Site Supporter

    The canning jars on all the shelves sure look pretty... but how is that going to work with a very minor earthquake? I live in the Midwest and about 10-12 years ago there was just a 4.2 or .3 quake over a hundred miles away and it woke me up and things fell off a couple shelves and pictures rattled on the walls. A tremor or gas explosion can happen in most areas of US. Remember the toy tremor near DC several years ago?

    If this food may be your survival, the shelves need to be secured to the walls and straps, boards or something employed to keep the jars on the shelves.
     
  10. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    We always had a slat across the bottom but it was a pain to get the jars in and out

    I don't live in an earth quake zone atm but that is a good catch.
     
  11. Airtime

    Airtime Monkey+++ Site Supporter

    It doesn't take much, even just a bungy cord stretched across the front will keep most jars on the shelf.

    Unless you live in the blue, you should consider quake mitigations. I was in the green zone and had cans fall off the shelves.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2015
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  12. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    I am in zone 3 so I know exactly what you are saying....great point and glad you brought it up. Easy to add a 1x2 across the face as a keeper to each row of shelves.

    This one of my fav's:
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Pax Mentis

    Pax Mentis Philosopher King Site Supporter

    I have been looking at the second from the top of YD's post for about a week now trying to figure out how to make it easily "rotatable".

    The best I have come up with so far is to make it a free-standing unit that could be loaded from the rear, pushing the older ones forward. If any here have a better way to go with it, I would be very interested in hearing it.
     
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  14. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    The best way would be to have it as a freestanding shelf unit as you suggested to achieve your goal... you just have to have the space to access both sides to add product to the backside. Maybe in a storage area or garage where you have the space you could do rows of these shelf units and store/manage a lot of food and rotate appropriately.
     
  15. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    your talking about the one where you hang from the lids or rim of the glass wear? My biggest concern with that one is bumping the lids and unsealing them or how much they swing if you give sufficient clearance for the lids.

    Its a puzzle I was just hoping for something from one of the brilliant, creative thinkers on here cuz I sure don't have any idea.
     
  16. Altoidfishfins

    Altoidfishfins Monkey++

    WOW! LOTS of great information on this thread.
    I really like that first rack. As you accumulate, the more recent expirations end up on top, to be accessed last.

    I realize most things are good way past the expiration date. But my wife and I recently rotated out our stores to find some items almost ten years past expiration. That makes great targets.

    Items that are only a year or three get moved from the BOL to home and eaten. Then newly purchased canned goods go the BOL.

    I also like the earthquake zone map. I like to study maps anyway, a quirk picked up from my father.
     
  17. Pax Mentis

    Pax Mentis Philosopher King Site Supporter

    As it appears to me, the channel actually holds them at the glass rim just below the lid so I really don't see the potential for unsealing them.

    We don't store a great number of glass-canned items so it probably is doable for us. None of us have ever enjoyed either gardening or canning so we mostly have the knowledge base and materials stored in case they are needed rather than the active garden and canning operation. Those glass-canned items we do have are either bought from locals or commercial products.

    For metal cans, we have a system much like the one in the OP.
     
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  18. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    @PaxMentis I remove the rings after they seal. So I was wondering if these sway much (was thinking of earthquake scenario) will they unseal or break. That was what I was thinking. The seals do break sometimes when bumped but the seals are not hugely fragile. Just thinking outloud.
     
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  19. Airtime

    Airtime Monkey+++ Site Supporter

    I understand CS's affinity for glass as I have had a couple cans over the years fail, but the percentage is really quite low. I know I've had glass containers break more often than cans failing. Broke a bottle just yesterday. Anyway, one concern about glass is light. Light, especially UV can degrade food products. Glass canning jars should ideally be in a storage room that is completely dark except of course when it's been entered to get or stash something.
     
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  20. UncleMorgan

    UncleMorgan I eat vegetables. My friends are not vegetables.

    No need to get complicated: Ganado's vertical storage system will work perfectly well with glass jars, as is.

    The trick is to put two ranger rings on each jar, and (of course) to proportion the chutes for ringed jars.

    A ranger ring (or ranger band) is just a jumbo utility rubber band made by salami-slicing an old inner tube. Cut bicycle inner tubes for small ones, truck tubes for the monster sizes, and anything in between.

    Ranger rings will keep the jars from clacking together and prevent cracking & chipping. Glass has mega strength in compression, so the jars will not break even when the whole stack drops down a jar-width as the bottom jar is removed.

    The ranger rings will actively cushion the drop.

    Also, for simple shelf units that need a slat across the front in case of earthquakes, just use a 1X2 drop bar set up like a door bar. It takes only a moment to lift the bar out of its hooks, remove a container, and replace the bar.
     
  1. Bandit99
  2. Ganado
  3. Ganado
  4. Ganado
  5. RightHand
  6. Pax Mentis
  7. Motomom34
  8. natshare
  9. Yard Dart
  10. tacmotusn
  11. CATO
  12. Mountainman
  13. Seacowboys
  14. homeshow
  15. melbo
    Found this on Ebay:...
    Thread by: melbo, Sep 27, 2007, 22 replies, in forum: Back to Basics
  16. ColtCarbine
  17. RightHand
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