Swabby's: The "slow down" and "the bloop"

Discussion in 'Tin Foil Hat Lounge' started by Tango3, Sep 20, 2009.


  1. Tango3

    Tango3 Aimless wanderer

    Okay navy dudes... what in hell are these ??(whale flatulence?)



    On May 19 of 1997, [COLOR=#D0D060 ! important][COLOR=#D0D060 ! important]NOAA[/COLOR][/COLOR] (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) was using an array of hydrophones (basically underwater microphones) when they discovered a strange sound, which is commonly referred to as "Slow Down" because the way that it, well, slows down!
    Listen to it here:
    Slow Down
    It was located at stable.toolserver.org...(unidentified_sound)&params=15_S_115_W_scale:40000000 , roughly off the coast of South America.
    To this day, the sound remains a mystery.

    Remember the location and date that this sound appeared. It is similar to the next one.

    Several times during the summer of 1997, "The Bloop" was heard by the NOAA using an array of hydrophones.
    Go here to hear the sound: The Bloop
    Scientists say that it is similar to the sound whales make, but it is far too loud to come from a whale. Judgeing by the sound level of it, the whale would have to be 3 times larger than a [COLOR=#D0D060 ! important][COLOR=#D0D060 ! important]Blue [COLOR=#D0D060 ! important]Whale[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR][​IMG]
    !
    It originated from stable.toolserver.org...(unidentified_sound)&params=50_S_100_W_scale:40000000 , around the coast of South America.
    To this day, the sound remains unexplained.


    Here are two sounds, from two similar locations, at dates that are near eachother, that have no explanation.
    Any theories?
    Atlantis?
    USOs?
    Military Activity?
    New Species of sealife?
    Other?
    shamelessly purloined justfor diversion from :
    http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread503244/pg1
     
  2. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    No sonarman aboard that I know of, but I'd bet on a seafloor vent burping or an undersea landslide.
     
  3. Tango3

    Tango3 Aimless wanderer

    The Monkey bivvy after a blazing saddles night of talltales around the campfire, beer and E.L.'s famous Texas roundup camp beans???:sneaky:ohno [fart][reddevil] [whiteflag] [yukface] [rofllmao][rofllmao][ROFL]
     
  4. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    I am almost tone deaf. Positively not a sonar tech. I know an E-9 retired master chief sonar tech I will forward that to, and we can see what he says. When I took the asvab navy entrance tests in 1967 i aced one section and i threatened to break the record (yes they were using vinyl) they were using to test me on sonar. In 1976 when I went back in after 6 years broken active service they made me take the asvab again because my original scores were so high and I had been out of High School for 8 years .... in their minds I would score lower.... I aced 2 sections and scored higher ....lol ..... i politely skipped the sonar test.
     
  5. Tango3

    Tango3 Aimless wanderer

    Poor hearing here too,Factories, guns, motorcycles and "busty babe" at the nudie bar stuck one in each ear. haven't been the same since:shock:[lolol]:eek:b::[peep][slow]
     
  6. Clyde

    Clyde Jet Set Tourer Administrator Founding Member

    I would believe ghrit since he was a sub sailor. Probably not just just a toilet backup or anything like that.
     
  7. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    Ok folks, here is the opinion of a retired Master Chief Sonar Technician. Tin Can sailor who hunted submarines for 26 years.

    They both sound like underwater seismic activity or temperatur fluctuations. Low frequency sound travels much further than higher frequencies due to the number of transitions. Also was the NOAA craft towing the array or was it fixed? Makes a big diifference. If towed then even a temperature gradient could cause the slow down sound and the bloop could be the crossing a sharp temperature gradient. There are several warm upwellings near South America.

    [flag]
     
  8. Tango3

    Tango3 Aimless wanderer

    makes alot of sense ( moving vs fixed ); OP said sosus hydrophones( fixed)...
     
  9. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    He never found us, that's a rock solid certainty. When we were working with anti-sub task groups, we had to fire a flare and make a lot of noise so they could find us to start the exercise. Usually, we lost them in less than 5 minutes. That includes tin cans, carriers with MAD gear in the air, helo dippers and other subs. One trip, we rendevoused with a couple bird farm sonarmen at a pub, and they were telling us we were making 60 knots headed dead north when we were making course 090 and not rigged for quiet (at about 7 knots.) We did NOT tell them otherwise at the time, but laughed our asses off. No way in hell that boat could make even close to 60 knots unless a major bomb went off underneath her.

    That said, sonarmen listen to a lot of things that are not related to ship's movements, whale farts being only a small fraction of what they are trained to recognize. I'll go with the MC Sonarman every time on natural noises or biologics.
     
  10. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    4 of the 12 ships in 17 years on ships were spent on the Knox DE or FF1052 Class. They had a single screw, bubble masking on the underwater hull, a very powerful active sonar if they chose to use it (I think one class of Hunter Killer Subs had one more powerful.) A very impressive passive sonar array coupled with an aft towed array capable of getting below most inversion layers. One notable time we dogged a russian boomer operating in her box off the east coast for 4 days without her being able to lose us. Yes us surface skimmers are basically just targets for allied technology subs, but prior to some really bad navy spies giving away the secrets, the bad guys were vulnerable to good surface skimmers. the Knox class was a cracker jack ASW platform. And prior to 1988 that nuke depth charge was awesome also. we were nuke capable.
     
  11. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    At the time, our tri-power active was the hottest active going. Had to be below (IIRC) 250 feet to crank it up on full power, or it would boil the ocean in the immediate vicinity of the active hydrophones. Didn't dare use it for fun, because the target could pin point us before the return signal told us where the target was. Only use was a final fix before launch of a rather significant load of boom. (Yeah, we were nuke enabled, torpedo and subroc.) Again, at the time, we were the quietest class of submarine, real sneaky.

    The passive sonar was awesome. You could hear the Russkie cooks footfalls. Couldn't tell if he was turning left or right in front of the range, but could tell if he was headed for the freeze box.

    If you would like, read "Blind Man's Bluff" (Sharon Sontag) and see some of the stuff that was pulled in that era by all services in all OAs. We are mentioned as one of the fun things that got off center resulting in meeting a Russian sub rather up close and personal in rather cold water, a real "wishing for a diaper" deal. Yeppers, a north Atlantic cold water training mission.

    A towed array on subs was not too useful, we didn't have one. The ones experimented with on short sails like ours usually wound up tangled in the screw, rudder or stern planes. The retrofits on the north Atlantic sails fared slightly better, but were vulnerable when bashing ice from underneath and truly sucked when taking a down bubble. I don't think any were extensively deployed other than a couple tests.
     
  12. Tango3

    Tango3 Aimless wanderer

    That's some world you guys" played" in...( I know every minute was "fer real"...)
     
  13. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Not all of it. There was that time in St. Croix, and another in Bermudoo. Oh, yeah, then there was Ft. Likkerdale. And if you could stand it, there was Bell's in Norfolk. And we must NOT forget the nights in San Juan. All told, out of the time on the boat, maybe two dozen days (excepting leave, of course) that didn't get too tedious or overly "real."
     
  14. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    A bit unrelated to the thread, but here's a shot of the boat during sea trials. Making a full bell throws a pretty good wake. Save yourself some scrolling and right click on the pic, and select view image. The guys on the bridge are the CO and XO. Commander AJ Baccioco and LCDR J Holland left to right. Both are still around. I have great respect for Jerry, then and now, one of the best brown shoes I met while in; served under him on two commands.
    Gato.
     
  15. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    Continuing off topic... I once had an all hands magazine with a picture of the only Knox Class Frigate to fire a Nuke Depth Charge. It was a combined Operational test and photo op. I can't discuss the maximum range this thing is fired to or the depth at which it detonates, but suffice to say the range is rather short when you consider this thing is not fully contained below the surface like an underground nuke test. In this case it creates it's own classic mushroom cloud as well as a tidal wave. The ship being featured with this mushroom cloud behind it off its starboard beam (right side when looking forward towards the pointy end) (except canoes) suffered major structural damage and had to be escorted as it limped back to port. A new policy was invented. The so called surf board technique. Just before firing a nuke depth charge, the ship was to increase to flank speed (maximum), commence starting a turn away from the target. Fire at the last moment, over the shoulder so to speak as they turned away increasing speed. haul ass directly away from the target at max speed with all nonesential personell below the waterline of the ship, and hope to hang ten riding the wave away from the blast on the tidal wave safely .... LOL .... TOTALLY INSANE !!! [flag] And, yes it was one of the 2 nukes I was an operator on.
     
  16. Tango3

    Tango3 Aimless wanderer

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