Traditional Arrows...(Crafting)

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by lonewolf88, Feb 20, 2016.


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  1. lonewolf88

    lonewolf88 Monkey

    I would like to learn woodworking. I have no interest in getting books or checking online. I can only learn hands on, in the field in person. I would like to meet an adept, expert or master woodsman, forester and/or woodworker to become my mentor, teach me how to identify suitable wood types for bows and arrowshafts and how to make both from scratch/untreated wood. Im in NC.
     
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  2. AxesAreBetter

    AxesAreBetter Monkey++

    Too bad you live so far out. I could certainly show you how not to build them, and you could EASILY learn from my mistakes...
     
  3. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    I tried this late summer and it was a fail but I haven't given up. First try was with pine and scrub maple. Cut the branches, tied them so they would dry straight then tried to skin them of the bark. One band-aid and lots of effort and I gave up. I learned I need better sticks for arrow making. I have started to think maybe bushes may have the branches I need. I spotted some taller bushes that have pretty straight sticks. Come Spring when things are awake and blooming I am going to try again.
     
  4. Witch Doctor 01

    Witch Doctor 01 Mojo Maker

    Welcome to the Monkey from eastern NC... they the following set of links... Hope they help

     
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  5. AxesAreBetter

    AxesAreBetter Monkey++

    You are supposed to cut the bark off when they are green!!!

    Also, and EVERYONE forgets this, but if you have a 3ft section of straight grain wood, you baton out 1/2" cubes the full three feet, then whittle of the edges until you have the diameter of shaft you want. It's known as the split shaft method, and it was used by the natives and the europeans to mass produce arrows.

    Tip of the Day!
     
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  6. lonewolf88

    lonewolf88 Monkey

    The general idea is easy. There was some site where I found suitable wood types for arrowshafts, but cant find it anymore. Nothing online is likely to stick. I, along with others learn best actually doing it with an adept, expert or master woodsman, forester or woodworker. Besides, you are not likely going to bring a laptop or book in the woods or mountains. Have to watch for threats like dangerous game and snakes/skunks.
     
  7. Witch Doctor 01

    Witch Doctor 01 Mojo Maker

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  8. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

  9. lonewolf88

    lonewolf88 Monkey

    Electricity and power may or may not be readily available all the time. Best to learn how to make arrows the traditional (1800s way) or medieval way. That arrow link includes modern supplies and technology. A drill isn't viable.

    I believe the general idea is cure and treat the wood, then shape motomom. Using either of the true methods stated above, youll have about 6 hours to weeks for the arrows and 3-7 weeks for a bow. Try to plan that project close to or during turkey season and/or deer season. For Sinew, the feathers and other natural materials. Rivercane, rose branches and wood branches are everywhere, just have to know where to look.

    Poplar and Ash are the only two suitable wood types for arrowshafts, there are other suitable wood types, but you would need a woodsman (old world vocation, consisting of forestry, farming and woodworking) to identify suitable wood types or to be one yourself. Woodsmen are often hunters as well, capable of treating hide into leather.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 23, 2016
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  10. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    False, an electric drill may be out, but a brace and bit , or push drill, is old school functional no matter what.
     
  11. AxesAreBetter

    AxesAreBetter Monkey++

    Where the heck did you get the idea that there are only two arrow woods? That is nonsense.

    If you really want to learn, Go pick up some dowels, and make you some arrows. I can offer you some very detailed advice, if you are interested, and I know where you can purchase goods for it, if you desire. Arrowmaking is traditionally a "childs" skill, and would be learned by having the materials brought to them, to teach them how to make the arrow itself, while they are being taught how to scavenge the materials in the field. It is not an art that is supposed to be learned exclusively at the table, and not supposed to be learned purely in the field by trial and error. You need to learn the concepts under "ideal" conditions, so that you can replicate it under less ideal one.
     
  12. lonewolf88

    lonewolf88 Monkey

    Sorry. I didn't mean to write only. typed too fast. It was meant to read ''Poplar and Ash are two suitable wood types and theres others, which Im not sure about.'' I am not a woodsman.
     
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  13. AxesAreBetter

    AxesAreBetter Monkey++

    For a hunting bow (70lbs or less) it is really a matter of just finding something that will shoot out of your bow. More specifically, first, that it does not blow up when you shoot it, then you figure out how to build them so that they hit the target, and lastly, you worry about arrow speed, if that is an issue.

    Concepts, not rules, living history is.
     
  14. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    Heavier arrows penetrate further, light go faster. Straight matters more than thin.
     
    lonewolf88 likes this.
  15. lonewolf88

    lonewolf88 Monkey

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