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What's wrong with Vista?

Discussion in 'Technical' started by melbo, Dec 15, 2007.

  1. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    What's wrong with Microsoft Windows Vista?

    by John Sullivan — last modified 2007-04-16 18:53

    Microsoft's new Windows Vista operating system is a giant step backward for your freedoms.
    Usually, new software enables you to do more with your computer. Vista, though, is designed to restrict what you can do.
    Vista enforces new forms of “Digital Rights Management (DRM)”. DRM is more accurately called Digital Restrictions Management, because it is a technology that Big Media and computer companies try to impose on us all, in order to have control over how our computers are used.
    Technology security expert Bruce Schneier explains it most concisely:
    Windows Vista includes an array of “features” that you don't want. These features will make your computer less reliable and less secure. They'll make your computer less stable and run slower. They will cause technical support problems. They may even require you to upgrade some of your peripheral hardware and existing software. And these features won't do anything useful. In fact, they're working against you. They're digital rights management (DRM) features built into Vista at the behest of the entertainment industry—And you don't get to refuse them.
    DRM gives power to Microsoft and Big Media.

    • They decide which programs you can and can't use on your computer
    • They decide which features of your computer or software you can use at any given moment
    • They force you to install new programs even when you don't want to (and, of course, pay for the privilege)
    • They restrict your access to certain programs and even to your own data files
    DRM is enforced by technological barriers. You try to do something, and your computer tells you that you can't. To make this effective, your computer has to be constantly monitoring what you are doing. This constant monitoring uses computing power and memory, and is a large part of the reason why Microsoft is telling you that you have to buy new and more powerful hardware in order to run Vista. They want you to buy new hardware not because you need it, but because your computer needs it in order to be more effective at restricting what you do.
    Microsoft and other computer companies sometimes refer to these restrictions as “Trusted Computing.” Given that they are designed to make it so that your computer stops trusting you and starts trusting Microsoft, these restrictions are more appropriately called “Treacherous Computing”.
    Even when you legally buy Vista, you don't own it.

    Windows Vista, like previous versions of Windows, is proprietary software: leased to you under a license that severely restricts how you can use it, and without source code, so nobody but Microsoft can change it or even verify what it really does.
    Microsoft says it best:
    The software is licensed, not sold. This agreement only gives you some rights to use the software. Microsoft reserves all other rights. Unless applicable law gives you more rights despite this limitation, you may use the software only as expressly permitted in this agreement. In doing so, you must comply with any technical limitations in the software that only allow you to use it in certain ways.
    To make it even more confusing, different versions of Vista have different licensing restrictions. You can read all of the licenses at http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/default.aspx.
    It's painful to read the licenses, and this is often why people don't object to them. But if we don't start objecting, we will lose valuable freedoms. Here are some of the ridiculous restrictions you will find in your reading:
    • If your copy of Vista came with the purchase of a new computer, that copy of Vista may only be legally used on that machine, forever.
    • If you bought Vista in a retail store and installed it on a machine you already owned, you have to completely delete it on that machine before you can install it on another machine.
    • You give Microsoft the right, through programs like Windows Defender, to delete programs from your system that it decides are spyware.
    • You consent to being spied upon by Microsoft, through the “Windows Genuine Advantage” system. This system tries to identify instances of copying that Microsoft thinks are illegitimate. Unfortunately, a recent study indicated that this system has already screwed up in over 500,000 cases.
    Free software like GNU/Linux does not require you to consent to these absurd licensing terms. It is called free software because you are free to make as many copies as you want, and to share it with as many friends as you want. Nobody will be monitoring your actions or falsely calling you a thief.
    What you can do to help protect your freedom

    There is a battle underway between those who value freedom, and corporations such as Microsoft who wish to profit by taking that freedom away. DRM and absurd licenses are at the heart of that battle. Please join us on the side of freedom by saying NO not just to Windows Vista and other DRM-enabled products, but to proprietary software in general. Instead, use non-DRM, “free” software such as the GNU/Linux operating system. You can get your work done while ensuring that your rights and freedoms will not be restricted now and into the future.
    As more and more of our lives become digital, it is vital that we protect our digital freedoms just like we have always worked to protect our freedom of expression in print and speech.

    Join the BadVista.org campaign today.
  2. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Adinfo -
    WGA is also set up to "push" when you get updates for XP. You can refuse to download, but only if you are set up for manual updates. If you have your machine set up for auto updates, it is on your machine, and I don't think there is any way to get rid of it. All it does is sit there and look for things that M$ doesn't like, using memory and processor.
  3. ColtCarbine

    ColtCarbine Monkey+++ Founding Member

    Is it just Vista or does Window XP Pro work in the same manner?
  4. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    WGA works the same in both so far as I know. If you know how to get rid of it in XP, let me know. Somehow it sneaked in on my desktop machine. (The laptop is still infection free.)
  5. ColtCarbine

    ColtCarbine Monkey+++ Founding Member

    Chances of me figuring out how to get rid of it are slim to none. Me and computers don't fair well together, it's not much of a mechanical device which leaves me very frustrated wanting to hit it with a hammer.
  6. Blackjack

    Blackjack Monkey+++

  7. <exile>

    <exile> Padawan Learner

    Although there are some issues with Vista this guy is a little over the top which is unfortunately typical of many people in the Linux 'movement', it would be nice to see him include some more detail on a few of his points but here are a few counterpoints.

    Most Microsoft users should start playing with Linux, *BSDs as the future of Windows is scary, misinformation aside.

    This is not specific to Vista, this has been the case with OEM versions of Windows XP as well.

    Again this has been in place before Vista.


    DISCLAIMER: This post generated on Ubuntu Feisty running Firefox 2.*
  8. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    LOL. I'm on Gutsy.

    I haven't yet found anything I used to do with XP that I can't do now. Usually it works better. At first I was ascared of a Terminal window ... Now I use sudo all the time as it's easier. In ububtu, I had to create a launcher for terminal as it wasn't right there like in earlier gnome/kde desktops.

    I've been writing an ubuntu post for a few weeks now. I hope you will chime in when I do so.

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