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What's your dream house?

Discussion in 'Back to Basics' started by Tully Mars, May 28, 2015.

  1. Tully Mars

    Tully Mars Metal weldin' monkey Site Supporter+

    I can't believe I'm really considering this, but the wife and I are thinking of selling the place here and building on a piece of property that she owns. It's decent sized has it's own water source, and is surrounded by other property owned by her family. We get on well with the relations with the exception of a BiL but that shouldn't be a problem. I plan on waving some greenbacks under his nose and I'm quite sure I'll be able to get him to sell his piece of ground which borders ours on one side, thus doubling ours right off the bat and ridding ourselves of a POS in the process.

    So, if you were to build a new home what are some of the features you would have/install?
    Motomom34 likes this.
  2. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    Start out with single floor and attached garage, minimum 1-1/2 stalls. depending on your hobby and equipment needs. One room with a tall ceiling in case you want a tall (grandfather's) clock. If you have to have a basement, make it full height with an outdoor access. For heat, go with an open hydroponic system unless you need A/C where air ducts are needed, or you can get along with a split system(s). Exterior walls to be 6" studs, interior, 4" is good enough. If a room needs to be soundproofed, like a bathroom, use 6" walls with 4" studs offset and pack the walls with fiberglas insulation.
    3M-TA3 and Tully Mars like this.
  3. Motomom34

    Motomom34 Moderator Moderator Site Supporter++

    I would have a single story home, like a ranch or something but no upper level. I would also need a basement. Part of the basement would have a storage area but also an area that could serve as cold storage/root cellar. A must have a screened in porch that I could add storm windows to, part of the porch would serve as a drying area for herbs and produce. Inside I would like a place to have a stove like @sarawolf's plus another wood stove. I have heard over and over that fireplaces just do not heat as well as wood stoves. A pantry is a must.

    I always debate windows. I really like lots of light in the house but people can see in. I heard that windows are good because the sun comes in and heats the house in the winter but then windows also lose heat.
    Last edited: May 28, 2015
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  4. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    @ghrit is correct about the 2X6 Plates with 2X4 Studs on 10" Centers.... But NOT for just SoundProofing... Building Exterior Walls in the fashion, increases the Insulation Quality of the Wall, SIGNIFICANTLY.... And it makes the Structure, capable of an addition of a Second Story, just by raising the Roof, literally.... One gots to Plan Ahead, for expansion, of Family, or just FloorSpace....

    Lots of double Pane Windows, on the south facing Wall, but with Heavy Drapes, or curtains that can be pulled across them in Night... to cut down on the Heat Loss, thru the Windows. The Dead Air space between the Pulled Drapes, and the windows increases the Insulation Factors, significantly....

    Where I live Energy Management is a BIG Issue, in building....
    Last edited: May 28, 2015
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  5. Dont

    Dont Just another old gray Jarhead Monkey Site Supporter

    Have been dreaming of a hobbit house.. Fire proof in the event of a forest fire.. Heavy concrete shutters for the windows and door.. Heat it with a boiler system and the extra hot water used to warm the garden bed's and green house.. And lots of extra rooms scattered about with connecting tunnels and several egress tunnel's.. Ahhh, dreams!
  6. madmax

    madmax Far right. Bipolar. Veteran. Don't push me.

    Do we get a live in maid? 'Cause that'll determine the square footage. LOL.

    We live in a 2 bed 1 bath house built in the '40s. It's had 2 big trees fall on it during hurricanes. We watched the roofers jump up and down on the roof saying, "Holy "expletive deleted" this thing is built!"

    We need a new AC/heating system. It's FL. Need new pipes. But it's pretty much us. I need a warehouse for my toys and Kelly needs a 2000 sf closet for her clothes and shoes. Maybe we need a bigger lot. Sure is nice going to the store and back in 10 mins. though. "cause we just aren't organized.
    Ganado and Motomom34 like this.
  7. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

    As far as the garage I would suggest building it with 10 foot ceilings I built a 30 x 30 x 10 with 2 x 6 walls a few years back and the extra 2 feet of is great.
    The lighting is recessed in the ceiling so there is a full 10 feet no banging on stuff.
    Tully Mars and ghrit like this.
  8. Tully Mars

    Tully Mars Metal weldin' monkey Site Supporter+

  9. sarawolf

    sarawolf Monkey++

    Our dream house was an underground that dh drew up (but we never got to build), complete with a large garage and a storm/root cellar in behind the house part. Large pantries are a must and lots of basement space to boot. Lots of out buildings for all the other things and a nice barn with a room just for canning/butchering etc.
  10. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    In the case of exterior walls, the wood has considerably less resistance to heat flow than insulation. Using the 2X allows you to put insulation between the outside (and inside) wall sheathing and sheet rock to interrupt the heat flow (most folks recommend staggering the 2X, every other one supporting the exterior sheathing and the alternates supporting the sheet rock. That's the way dot gov does it in the arctic.) For the sound insulation, wood also conducts sound better than even air, so the insulation interrupts that path as well as absorbs some of the, ah, less desirable noise from the throne room.

    Adding a bit, if triple glazed windows can be had, use them instead of double glazed, even in mild climates if a/c is part of the life style. Much more insulating effect. Of course, don't use aluminum or plastic frames and sashes, stabilized wood is the way to go. And to add to BTs item, yes, heavy drapes in cold climates, and light blocking in warmer areas.
    Last edited: May 28, 2015
    stg58, kellory and Tully Mars like this.
  11. NotSoSneaky

    NotSoSneaky former supporter

    I'd prefer to stay on one level. Three bedrooms, one for the Mrs & me with a full bath, double vanity so I'm not siftin' through the Mrs's warpaint looking for my toothbrush & comb, another bedroom for my "man cave - fly tyin' - radio shack and gun stuff", the other for the Mrs. sewing room. Dining room next to an efficient kitchen with large pantry. Good sized family / media room with an attached 1 1/12 bath. Open floorplan so the heating / cooling stays even.
    At least one large woodstove. Would prefer a full basement but can do without.

    2 1/2 bay garage with workbench & closet for generators when power goes out. Above garage; 1 bed apt ( and another woodstove) for the man-child. This way he can be independent, have a separate address yet still be close.
    Sapper John, kellory and Tully Mars like this.
  12. Tully Mars

    Tully Mars Metal weldin' monkey Site Supporter+

  13. Tully Mars

    Tully Mars Metal weldin' monkey Site Supporter+

    That is a good idea. Hadn't given it any thought as I do all the mechanic stuff in a shop. But, building from scratch 2 extra feet wouldn't be any big deal material wise.
  14. DarkLight

    DarkLight I self identify as a Blackhawk Attack Helicopter! Site Supporter

    I can't remember what it's called but I would want to leverage thermal mass heating and cooling from the ground. On the phone so I can't really look it up.
  15. Gopherman

    Gopherman Sometimes I Wish I Could Go Back to Sleep Site Supporter++

    Ganado and Dont like this.
  16. Gopherman

    Gopherman Sometimes I Wish I Could Go Back to Sleep Site Supporter++

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  17. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

    If you live in an area that uses basements which I do I would love to have a 10' ceiling down there as well with a 48" stairway.
    It would provide storage and shelter.
    Tully Mars and kellory like this.
  18. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    For me, two floors and a full basement. Two garages. One attached for the cars, and household items, one remote two floors high, for the workshop. Needs to have a beam and trolley hoist for chainfalls, for heavy work like engine swaps, and a pit for oil changes, grease jobs, and such. Needs to be plumbed for full bath, shop sinks, eye wash and shower. (Easily done)
    Mudroom off the attached garage, can contain the trifuel generator, (natural gas, as the primary). Vented out through the walls.
    Both garages would have heavy duty floor to ceiling shelving @2' front to back, and completely covering two of four walls. Both garages would have a row of insulated glass windows just below the eves, for passive light, and solar powered attic gable fans to keep the heat vented.(switched) remote garage would have a wood burner and solar heater. 220vt electric baseboard heater if needed, since it would be wired for the welder, and lathe, anyways..
    House would have a cupola, for roof access to the antennas, and steel roof. Might as well line the walls of it with plate steel (in case it ever needs to be used as a defensive fire point, or watch tower.) Would also vent heat by stack effect, by just opening a couple doors or windows.
    6" exterior walls and insulation as discussed above, but foamed in place insulation, if I could afford it. (Much higher R-factor, better coverage, no gaps.)
    Wrap around porch and balcony (no access to balcony from ground).
    Solar panels on remote garage roof for everything that requires recharging.
    House would have a fire place at each end, with a section of ductwork to left and right of each hearth. (louvered top and bottom) this will magnify the heat output by drawing at floor level, and venting high. radiator installed behind to act as a passive water preheater. Natural gas for heat, stove, water heater as primary. Small flat topped wood burner in kitchen for back up, comfort, and as a warmer while cooking on stove.
    Small bedroom just for hunting/fishing gear, racked, organized, and ready to use at a moments notice.
    Couple of sheds for materials, (one for sandbags and pumps) and behind the remote garage, a full sized shipping container, as storage locker, for quads, spare electronic parts, backups, radio gear, (Faraday cage style)
    (Just for starters.....;))
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  19. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

  20. Ganado

    Ganado Monkey+++

    I have been looking at this as well. I found a builder who does earth homes and guarantees the roof won't leak. Single level and has lots of light. If you need more you can also use solar tubes. If you want links let me.know and I will post when I get home.

    I've looked at geothermal exchange systems for use in above ground home but not really necessary for earthen homes.

    Must for me is a half buried greenhouse that doubles as heat exchange and food source for winter greens...

    Size only matters if you want a standard home. The new trend is to have one room with moving walls and furniture so that 400 sf is usable at 1600 sf. They are calling it flex space or some such nonsense. But the technology is such that your bed can fold up into tje wall just using your index finger and the shelves swing so that you dont jave to move stuff. again if you want links let me know and I will post when I get home.

    The advantage to underground homes is that they blend in and are energy efficient. The major disadvantage is if you can't pay cash financing and resale can be difficult. This builder does have access to some financing.

    If you don't want undergroind, then ICF'S are decent and more insulating, easy to build.

    If you live in a high earthquake area go with a stick built home. With radiant heat floors.

    I have more info just let me know what you are interested in.
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