43 Uses for WD-40

Discussion in 'General Survival and Preparedness' started by survivalmonkey, Mar 9, 2010.


  1. survivalmonkey

    survivalmonkey Monkey+++

    I got this in an e-mail.

    DISCLAIMER: I have no idea if it works, but I will share it with you ... maybe someone here knows if this is accurate, and if so please let us know!

    .................................................. .......
    A lady got up very early one morning and went outside to pickup the Sunday paper, she noticed someone had sprayed red paint all around the sides of the neighbors brand new beige truck. She went over and woke him up and gave him the bad news. He was, of course extremely upset. They stood there trying to figure out what could be done about the problem.. They decided there wasn't much recourse, but to wait until Monday, since nothing was open. Just then another neighbor came out of his house, surveyed the situation and immediately went to get his WD-40 out and cleaned the red paint off with it. Guess What! It cleaned up that paint without harming the original paint on the truck! I'm impressed!!

    Water Displacement #40. The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and degreaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company..

    It's name comes from the project that was to find a 'water displacement' compound. They were successful with the fortieth formulation, thus WD-40. The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts.

    Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you.. IT IS MADE FROM FISH OIL. When you read the "shower door" part, try it. It's the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it works just as well as glass. It is a miracle! Then try it on your stove top... It is now shinier than it has ever been before .

    WD 40 also:

    1) Protects silver from tarnishing.
    2) Removes road tar and grime from cars.
    3) Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
    4) Gives floors that "just-waxed" sheen without making it slippery.
    5) Keeps flies off cows.
    6) Restores and cleans chalkboards.
    7) Removes lipstick stains.
    8) Loosens stubborn zippers.
    9) Untangles jewelery chains.
    10) Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
    11) Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
    12) Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing.
    13) Removes tomato stains from clothing..
    14) Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
    15) Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.
    16) Keeps scissors working smoothly.
    17) Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes
    18) It removes black scuff marks from the kitchen floor! Open some windows if you have a lot of marks.
    19) Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car, removed quickly,
    with WD-40!
    20) Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
    21) Lubricates gear shift on lawn mowers.
    22) Rids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises.
    23) Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
    24) Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
    25) Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, well as vinyl bumpers.
    26) Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
    27) Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
    28) Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling.
    29) Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.
    30) Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.
    31) Removes splattered grease on stove.
    32) Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
    33) Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
    34) Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).
    35) Removes all traces of duct tape.
    36) Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve
    arthritis pain
    37) Florida 's favorite use 'Cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers.'
    38) Protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
    39) WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time.
    40) Ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch.
    41) WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray on the mark and wipe wit h a clean rag.
    42) If you've washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of
    laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40 and presto the lipstick is gone!
    43) If you spray WD-40 on the distributor cap, it will displace the
    moisture and allow the car to start.

    Keep a can of WD-40 in your kitchen cabinet. It is good for oven burns or any other type of burn. It takes the burned feeling away and heals with NO scarring. Remember, the basic ingredient is FISH OIL*


    More...
     
  2. kckndrgn

    kckndrgn Moderator Moderator Founding Member

    Re: 43 Uses for WD-40 [GIM Survival Prep]

    WD-40 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Tried the WD-40 to remove crayon from the wall, took the "semi-gloss" finish right off!!

    How can it do #31, when the product itself is a petroleum based oil product - replace one grease with another one?

    I'll stick to using it as a lubrication & penetrating oil
     
  3. XR750

    XR750 Monkey+

    Not a big fan of WD 40 as a lube great for gettiing water out of ignitions system also getting tar off of vehicles and chewing gum
     
  4. Seawolf1090

    Seawolf1090 Adventure Riding Monkey Founding Member

    WD-40 has other components that accumulate in our bodies - the 'arthritis cure' is a 'use at your own risk' type of thing.
    I have a buddy who uses it to lube his motorcycle chain. I use it to CLEAN the chain, then use a true lube to protect it.
    Some folks use it on guns - but it has been said to harden into a sludge that can gum up the action.
    WD-40 is NOT a lubricant!
    I use it to keep outdoor padlocks from rusting.
    Dad always used it to keep his fishing reels from rusting.
     
  5. Hispeedal2

    Hispeedal2 Nay Sayer

    I think the problem with WD40 as a lubricant is how short it stays in place. It seems to evaporate.... if that is possible for an oil??

    I tend to use something more viscous for about any job. Hell, I was just using CLP on the clutch return spring of my jeep (it was squeaky).

    I will give WD40 this.... you can find it about anywhere in America. Old garage, old home, wal-mart, grocery store, gas station. It's availability is impossible to overlook. So, I give it a B rating. It will work in a pinch for most jobs (even if not that well or very long) and it is generally available in your wife's purse.
     
  6. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    WD 40 (if the legends are true) is the fortieth formulation that the inventor tried while developing it as a water dispersant. Just right for electrical work on cars and bikes.

    It's a lousy lube. I don't know where the slippery feel comes from, but it doesn't last long.

    Wolfie, don't do that if you are using an O ring chain. WD 40 is a penetrant, and it'll get behind to O rings and dilute the factory lifetime lube. Brake cleaner won't penetrate (dunno why, but it doesn't) so that's what I use on chains when kero won't git 'er done. I like kero and an old toothbrush for cleaning the sprockets and chain, it has no effect on the O rings, and is fully compatible with PJ (and this damn high price British chain "wax.") WD 40 does work as a throttle cable lube, but you have to squirt it in more often than if you use one of the HIGH price cable lubes. (By the way, the "wax" doesn't fling itself all over everything and glom onto grits. Dunno why, but I've had great luck with it on these dirt roads around here.)

    I'm going to have to try number 10. There are some rust stains that refuse to go away with dish soap and Scotchbrite.

    My car door locks get a squirt every washing. You want frustration? Get some water in the locks in freezing weather, and wait for the sun to come up on a winter morning so you can go to work. Especially when you know an E6 is going to taste your butt when you miss quarters. (Yeah, I know about that.)

    K-drag, petroleum begets all sorts of things, heavy grease right on to light easily evaporated solvent. They mix readily, so #31 works. But again, WD 40 is one piss poor lube, no staying power at all.

    Since I discovered brake cleaner, I've stopped using WD 40 on the guns. Works better on the nooks and crannies that catch crud, and doesn't seem to bother the wood. And, there is no gun grease that stands up to it, so once squirted you gotta do a complete lube job or suffer the consequences; some gun steels want to rust pretty readily in the least humidity. (My 870 knows this, and taught me well.)

    I'm due for washing the pickup, so I think I'll try the bug and tar removing trick. Commercial tar removers have disappointed me.

    All that said, WD 40 is a second choice for me most of the time. Except on electrical stuff, there are better things around. But it works. I always have a can or two around, and is often the first choice if I don't have the "right stuff" to hand on the bench.
     
  7. ORMilitia

    ORMilitia Monkey+

    I have a can and use it mostly as a bait enhancer for fishing. Salmon and sturgeon love it.

    I use other lubricants and cleaners that are better suited to a purpose.
     
  8. fortunateson

    fortunateson I hate Illinois Nazis!

    Cr*p! You're right. Makes sense. I was just going to say that I use it on my chain to drive water out after powerwashing (dirt bike). Does that well, but no more.

    BTW, I use chainsaw bar oil on my chain. Low sling and works perfectly.

    WD40 should not be used to lube anything small and intricate because it forms a varnish when dry. Hinges - ok, locks - no.

    It's a good solvent for removing most oil based messes.
     
  9. XR750

    XR750 Monkey+

    I agree not a good chain lube good for cleaning chains. I like Maxima Chain wax for chains I believe Castrol make chain wax too.
    Great for displacing water on You Atlas or Titan missels[lolol]I crack my self up
    Wolfie, don't do that if you are using an O ring chain. WD 40 is a penetrant, and it'll get behind to O rings and dilute the factory lifetime lube. Brake cleaner won't penetrate (dunno why, but it doesn't) so that's what I use on chains when kero won't git 'er done. I like kero and an old toothbrush for cleaning the sprockets and chain, it has no effect on the O rings, and is fully compatible with PJ (and this damn high price British chain "wax.") WD 40 does work as a throttle cable lube, but you have to squirt it in more often than if you use one of the HIGH price cable lubes. (By the way, the "wax" doesn't fling itself all over everything and glom onto grits. Dunno why, but I've had great luck with it on these dirt roads around here.)



    Read more: http://www.survivalmonkey.com/forum...43-uses-wd-40-a.html#post122303#ixzz0pjuOqLjD
    p
    .I stand corrected, but I still like Dri-slide for cables and I agree about the chain wax.
     
  10. ItalianGator

    ItalianGator Monkey+

    I seriously have my doubts regarding the other uses of WD-40. The source for this email might very well be the same person that said we should cough in the event of a heart attack!

    However, Nutnfancy uses WD-40 in some of his videos (see Nutnfancy channel on YoutTube). He sprays it on his survival knife before he batons thick pieces of wood. It helps the knife go through the wood by limiting the amount of sticky sap that might otherwise slow up the process.
     
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