Bugging' IN and Lockin' up!!

Discussion in 'General Survival and Preparedness' started by TraumaHawk2011, May 24, 2012.


  1. fedorthedog

    fedorthedog Monkey+++

    The Vietnam era flack jackets were Kevlar. They will not stop rifle rounds but should stop most pistol rounds, that's all police body Armour does. Also the PD vest has a plate that goes over your heart. it will stop some rifle rounds, if the vest does not have one find one. They are called a trauma plate.
     
  2. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

    I owned some Vietname era plate vests, and I wouldn't trust them to protect you at all. In fact, even the old 80's-90's era military body armor is not worth their weight. They might be great for lining the walls of the house or the door of the truck, but I wouldn't wear it. There's much lighter, more effective armor today that can be had for cheap. I linked it earlier.
     
  3. wrc223

    wrc223 Monkey+

    Location has to be a concideration as well.
    Bugging in and lockin up will look very different to someone in Maine vs. someone in Florida.
    On the security side of things, you need to pay very close attention how the outside of your home is situated. I made the mistake of poorly positioning my firewood a few years back. Looking at it as a lazy homeowner, it was in a great location. Looking at it as an invader, it was a dream come true. Who could ask for anything more, great cover along the house.
    Use landscaping to your advantage!! Large rocks, walls, sharp elevation changes, fences, and bushes are GREAT for adding security to your bug in location.
    Pay close attention to any outbuildings on your property. If possible have all openings face your house. Close off or secure any windows or doors that dont face your house. Secure any resources in those buildings that could be used to get to you.
    Mark your yardage around your property and know your firing positions. Because I have fields, I have natual markers. As I look I know it is 75 yards to the close tree line, I know it is 100 yards to the fence line, I know it is 230 yards to the upper tree line, I know it is 600 yards to the upper field, I know it is 120 yards to the river, etc.
    Safe areas inside the home with limited means of enterance or egress and that can provide for safe defensive fire lanes and reinforce the walls beyond those lanes of fire to stop or slow rounds.
    Keep things simple, the more engineered, the more likely it will break. Train, train, train. Know your gear and know it's capabilities. NOT its ADVERTISED capabilities, YOUR capabilities with it!! Be honest, you cant argue true end result.
     
  4. Well having been up and about this morning, I decided to take a moment to check her and add another thought.

    Fences. well not just fences but things like black berries an other thorny barriers. Directing people to where you want them to be when coming to "visit" is often very helpful.

    I have seen homes with lockable entrance atrium with a gate that can be unlocked from the inside, and the way the gate swings, it has to be closed before the front door can be opened.

    Forces anyone wanting access to "lock themselves in" before they can get into the main door. Also restricts things like using of battering rams and stacking a "team" for a forced entrance.

    Having a gate rigged to a garage door opener and a intercom with a camera at the entrance of your property permits deciding to tell people you are home and whether or not to open the gate and let them in.

    Oh, and while I'm at that Dogs and other animals are very useful for many things including deterrents, watching other animals, and alarms.

    Just a few ideas pre coffee.

    Thad.
     
    Mechwolf, mysterymet and chelloveck like this.
  5. mysterymet

    mysterymet Monkey+++

    Good idea about using bushes and natural or man made to look natural terrain features to funnel people where you want them to be.
     
  6. wrc223

    wrc223 Monkey+

    I am a big fan of using 4" or bigger poles spaced 6'-8' apart, 5 1/2' high and set in concrete. Then run 4' heavy gage wire mesh down it. About 3" and 10" from the top run two courses of barbed wire. Along the bottom plant morning glorys. Water well and let the functional beauty funnel threats to your favorite point of impact.
     
  7. See that is what I'm trying to hit on. Functional design that works both today and also provides additional security for later on. (I'm gonna take your idea on morning glories and apply that some around here.)

    I often plant them along the south side of some windows up to a attachment at the eves just for the "shade" effect from our hot southron summers. so flowers around the place are kind of already something that Anyone looking will see and be used to .

    Side benefit of using like blackberries and such is that you get, food. I'm looking at rose hips also since they are a nice thorny hedge. Not many people will try to push through brambles like they may try to climb a fence.

    Putting what for lack of better words "tank traps" into the brambles would offer a nasty surprise for someone in a vehicle trying to bull their way through also. And hidden like that raises few red flags today.

    I always try to plan my stuff for how I live today and how I might have to live tomorrow. Kind of a "permaculture" of home defense lol. One item, many uses ya know?

    A nice side benefit of having my land set up with such stuff means that no one just can come up and knock on the door and bother me. They have to stop at the gate at the front road which is almost a half mile away. If I look at the cam and don't want to talk to them I just ignore them till they leave.

    If they elect to force the gate and enter anyway, then I know that it is something more than just jehovia's witnesses or the local salesman.

    Oh, another thing I have found real handy is putting out those sensors that will turn on outside lights but instead of that rigging them up to ring a door bell when tripped. Cheap motion sensors / detectors in effect, and the doorbell is one with a special ring different from the bell at the gate or front door. (well actually at the front gate is one that triggers the bell that lets me know a car or person just came up.) I also use one of those uninterrupted power supplies to keep em working even if power were cut for a time without having to switch on the generator.

    Well I'm off to eat some BBQ and enjoy a few home brews. Just had this brain drizzle and wanted to share it while it was on my mind.

    Stay safe and keep smiling, it makes the tyrants and their jbt's wonder what ya been up to.

    Thad.
     
    chelloveck likes this.
  8. Harbin

    Harbin Monkey+

    Does anyone have a source for longer shelf life vitamin and mineral supplements? I'm not referring to the daily flintstones vitamins kids take (or took when I was little), what I mean is something that will help get you by in case your garden isn't blooming yet or you are facing limited food and need to stretch your supplies longer. Is this even an option? I started thinking about this while having breakfast the other day when I saw my wife taking pre-natal vitamins.
     
  9. BTPost

    BTPost Stumpy Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    Cool, Dark, and NO Oxygen, works best at storing ANY complex Organic Molecules....
     
  10. Harbin

    Harbin Monkey+


    For no oxygen, would storing under a vacuum or w/ nitrogen be better?
     
  11. BTPost

    BTPost Stumpy Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    Dry Nitrogen is better than vacuum, simply because a vacuum would tend to suck any Volatiles, from the contents, to equalize the internal pressure. Dry Nitrogen in a Cool, Dark, environment is basically inert, and will not react, with the stored contents. It takes ENERGY to break down Organics, and Cool, Dark, keeps the available ENERGY, to a minimum. eliminating Oxygen (A highly energetic element) keeps it from causing any breakdown of the Organics. ..... YMMV....
     
    Brokor likes this.
  12. tc556guy

    tc556guy Monkey+++

    The thin metal plates you used to see in police body armor were spall plates, not true rifle-rated inserts.
    A rifle-rated plate is a hefty piece of gear similar to a SAPI plate
     
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