Costco Storage Food Deal -$799

Discussion in 'General Survival and Preparedness' started by melbo, Apr 7, 2010.


  1. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    The THRIVE 1 Year Food Supply comes complete with 84 #10 (gallon size) cans of grains, fruits, veggies, protein & beans, dairy, and baking essentials. With over 5,000 servings and many foods with a shelf life of up to 25 years, this package will give you variety, nutrition, and peace of mind

    http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?whse=BC&topnav=&prodid=11487214&ec=BC-EC877-CatHome&pos=20&lang=en-US

    $799.99 after $200 OFF
    Shelf Reliance THRIVE™
    1-year Supply
    Dehydrated & Freeze-Dried Food
    1-year Food Supply For 1 Person
    5,011 Total Servings
    84 #10 Cans
    Item # 443250



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    Shelf Reliance is your premier source for food storage and emergency preparedness planning. Because nothing is more important than the health and safety of your family, they provide only top-of-the-line products. Shelf Reliance’s line of THRIVE Foods are held to the highest standards. All THRIVE Foods have been developed with everyday menu planning in mind, though they are also the perfect addition to your long-term food storage supply. With their great taste and simple preparation, THRIVE is a trusted source of healthy, delicious meals anytime.

    The THRIVE 1 Year Food Supply comes complete with 84 #10 (gallon size) cans of grains, fruits, veggies, protein & beans, dairy, and baking essentials. With over 5,000 servings and many foods with a shelf life of up to 25 years, this package will give you variety, nutrition, and peace of mind.

    12 month food supply for 1 Person
    6 month food supply for 2 People
    3 month food supply for 4 People
    Shipment arrives in 14 separate boxes
    Grains and rice have a shelf life of up to 30 years

    Freeze-dried foods have a shelf life of up to 25 years

    Dehydrated foods have a shelf life of up to 15 years

    Simple rehydration instructions, recipes, and helpful tips are included on each can
    5,011 total servings
    84 gallon-sized cans
    This THRIVE 1 Year 1 Person Food Storage package contains 84 #10 (gallon size) cans. See below for specific package contents.

    Grains
    8 Cans of Instant White Rice (48 servings per can)
    12 Cans of Hard White Winter Wheat (44 servings per can)
    3 Cans of 6 Grain Pancake Mix (50 servings per can)
    2 Cans of Elbow Macaroni (45 servings per can)

    Vegetables
    6 Cans of Dehydrated Potato Chunks (42 servings per can)
    1 Can of Freeze-Dried Sweet Corn (46 servings per can)
    1 Can of Freeze-Dried Green Peas (41 servings per can)
    1 Cans of Dehydrated Chopped Onions (45 servings per can)
    1 Can of Freeze-Dried Mushroom Pieces (48 servings per can)
    1 Can of Freeze-Dried Broccoli (47 servings per can)

    Fruits
    2 Cans of Organic Apple Slices (48 servings per can)
    2 Cans of Freeze-Dried Strawberries (45 servings per can)
    1 Can of Freeze-Dried Blueberries (50 servings per can)
    1 Can of Freeze-Dried Blackberries (49 servings per can)
    2 Cans of Freeze-Dried Raspberries (48 servings per can)

    Dairy
    6 Cans of Powdered Milk (43 servings per can)
    3 Cans of Chocolate Drink Mix (48 servings per can)
    Proteins/Beans

    The taste and texture of TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein) is consistent with real meat, making it a great addition to vegetarian diets

    3 Cans of Bacon TVP (47 servings per can)
    3 Cans of Beef TVP (44 servings per can)
    3 Cans of Chicken TVP (45 servings per can)
    2 Cans of Taco TVP (42 servings per can)
    6 Cans of Pinto Beans (49 servings per can)
    1 Can of Black Beans (49 servings per can)
    2 Cans of Lima Beans (49 servings per can)
    3 Cans of Lentils (52 servings per can)
    6 Cans of Whole Eggs (236 servings per can)
    Cooking Basics

    2 Cans of White Sugar (46 servings per can)
     
  2. fortunateson

    fortunateson I hate Illinois Nazis!

    That's a pretty good deal. Of course prices have changed. I bought a similar setup pre-Y2k for 399. This still beats most of what I've seen out there.

    My kit came from the now defunct Millennium Foods.
    We open a can every year or two to check out freshness. It's ok, but everything tastes the same - kinda has a semi-rancid cardboard taste. Definitely not rancidity because it's even true of stuff with no oils - just weird.
    We've eaten it, no-one's gotten sick, but definitely not our first choice.

    Also found out that I have a wheat sensitivity, so these kits are out.

    From now on , I'm just going to pack my own.
    Started collecting 5 gal buckets. Bought some mylar bags and oxygen absorbers.
    Going to commandeer a hair straightener from one of the girls to seal up the bags.
    Also collecting canned food from the supermarket.
     
  3. Mountainman

    Mountainman Großes Mitglied Site Supporter+++

    Sounds like a good deal. Would be nice to get a discount for a group buy, but I don't think Costco would go for it.
     
  4. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    I find it interesting to note what various people believe is an appropriate one year supply of food for one person/ or 3 months for family of 4. Then I compare number of # 10 cans or equivelent. Total weight of the food, and the cost.
    .
    ie; Cosco 84 #10 cans at $799
    .
    emergency essentials 123 #10 cans (550 lbs) at $850
    .
    my own list thru LDS, if indeed I am able to make the purchase as a non-member, 228 #10 cans (890 lbs) for $923.
    .
    Its worth looking at to get your monies worth that's for sure.
     
  5. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    Better to count the calories than the weight. The above deal works out to 223 days at 2000 calories a day based on either the reviews on the costco site or elsewhere. Someone broke it down based on the can labels.

    I look at almost all of this prepacked food as supplemental to other food sources. For extra calories, I store rendered, grass fed, beef lard and lot's of high quality chocolate ;)
     
  6. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    Believe me I understand what you are saying. I have been playing with my list for a while. I will compare it against any of these package deals any day. In fact I did a side by side tonight before I wrote the post. We each have different tastes as well.
     
  7. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    .
    Summary Comparison; Grains 102 vs 25, veggies 54 vs 11, fruit 18 vs 8, milk 18 vs 9, beans 18 vs 12, real meat 24 to 30 vs protien 17. suger 18 cans vs 2. I think I can exceed 2000 calories per person daily.
     
  8. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    The costco deal seems good for the amount of Freeze dried you get. FD is usually much more expensive in my research, especially going freeze dried and ready meal like Mountain House. ready to eat in 10 minutes out of one can makes for some easy comfort food without having to come up with a recipe.

    Freeze Dried is extremely convenient and the low moisture content coupled with the usual nitrogen packaging makes for some extremely long shelf life.

    I have to admit that I haven't much looked into the LDS stuff and will take a look at it over the weekend.
     
  9. Hispeedal2

    Hispeedal2 Nay Sayer

    While freeze dried is generally more expensive, I like the idea of rotating through stored food with regular consumption. Then shelf life for food stocks less than a year isn't as much of an issue. Also, the taste is a ton better on most all canned food than freeze dried.

    I could see freeze dried being useful for longer term (say longer than 5 years) or as a mobile food cache (for those that are bugging out to a better place to bug in but don't want to leave their supply there).

    I guess the package deals feel the need for those that want piece of mind now without having to plan ahead by buying extra rice and beans each week. If your food supply is that dire and you think that it will be needed before a year is up, these may be a good deal.
     
  10. dragonfly

    dragonfly Monkey+++

    wow! Do I have my work and "expenses" cut out for me!
    Lots to get, besides all my canned goods, and some dry foods....
    Sheesh!
    Maybe IF I win the lotto?
     
  11. franks71vw

    franks71vw Monkey+++

    If taste is a concern why not have save some spices Salt Garlic etc that should last the same way if sealed properly. Am I correct or???
     
  12. Hispeedal2

    Hispeedal2 Nay Sayer


    Agreed.
     
  13. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    Oh I definately agree. Not only that but read the following from the internet grocer;
    A lot of other preparedness sites sell you some of the following items packed for long-term storage ... and they're not needed packed so expensively. Many of them'll store "forever" if you pack them in jars. (See why you love us? We save you money!)

    Get LOADS of Ball or Mason jars with lids and bands. Into these put:

    Plain Salt
    Iodized Salt
    Pepper
    Sugar
    Brown Sugar
    Baking Powder
    Baking Soda
    Cornstarch
    Herbs and Spices that you like and use
    Powdered Mustard
    Yeast
    Multi-Vitamins

    Try to get the following in glass containers:
    Honey
    Corn Syrup
    Maple Syrup
    Vanilla Extract
    Other Flavored Extracts that you like
    White Vinegar
    Apple Cider Vinegar
    Mustard
    Ketchup (or Catsup)
    Salad Dressings
    Pickles
    Olives
    BBQ Sauce
    Soy Sauce
    Sweet and Sour Sauce
    Any Hot Sauces you like and use
    Fish Sauce, if you like and use it

    Other than that, browse YOUR pantry for what you currently eat.

    .
    For me, I have my own list of items to reflect my tastes. Each of you should do the same.
     
  14. Ajax

    Ajax Monkey++

    Olive Oil is good for some extra calories and fat, put a table spoon on a bowl of veggies or rice.
     
  15. MinTX

    MinTX lostinaustin

    I am glad to see folks mentioning spices. I can eat almost anything if I spice it just right! I have been stocking up on dry spices at places like Big Lots (you can get them cheap there!) and packaging them in the heat sealed plastic for flat storage.
     
  16. CrufflerJJ

    CrufflerJJ Monkey++

    When you say "plastic bags", I hope that you mean aluminized mylar pouches.

    If you pack them in polyethylene plastic bags (sandwich bags or ziploc bags), the volatile oils (yummy flavors) leak right through the bags.

    If you pack them in standard nylon/LDPE pouches (as used in FoodSaver) machines, your storage life will be a little better, but still pretty lousy.

    For long term storage, use vacuum packed glass jars (stored in a dark place), or nice thick aluminized mylar pouches. Store with oxygen absorbers for best shelf life.

    If you can smell the spice through the plastic bag, you're not using the best type of bag.
     
  17. MinTX

    MinTX lostinaustin

    Been doin' the food saver thing!
    Thanks for the info!
    I am thinking I may have to be a bit more mobile so the pouches will pack easier than jars.
     
  18. BetterSafe

    BetterSafe Monkey+

    I just think you get a lot more bang for your buck by getting mylar bags and oxygen absorbers. What does 100 lbs of rice cost at Sam's? $40? 36 pounds of pasta? $30? Instant potatoes, beans, pancake mix, lots of good things just waiting to be sealed up and stuck in the basement.
     
  19. fortunateson

    fortunateson I hate Illinois Nazis!


    But how does olive oil store?
    I was under the impression that most oils will go rancid if left at over 70F for too long.
    I have a big 2 gallon jug of generic vegetable oil in the freezer. I figure it will keep indefinitely there and when TSHTF, the clock will start on its shelf life.
    Beyond that, I've been storing Crisco which has a 2 year date on the can and will probably hold much longer. (I know it's bad for you, but I'm thinking survival/practicality).

    When it comes to growing your own - sunflower. Easy to grow, store and a plentiful source of oil.
     
  20. tacmotusn

    tacmotusn Mosquito Sailor

    I hope you have something truly secure to put those bags in, like new metal trash cans with lids, or ammo cans, or glass jars with metal lids. Rats and mice can and will chew thru cardboard, plastic cans and storage totes, and even wood boxes. You need glass or metal to keep them out, and you have to protect the glass from being knocked off a shelf and broken open.
     
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