Dumb question

Discussion in 'General Survival and Preparedness' started by monkeyman, Aug 11, 2005.


  1. monkeyman

    monkeyman Monkey+++ Moderator Emeritus Founding Member

    Ok, I know a lot of folks have mentioned that a short wave radio is a minimal need in an emergency kit but I never have known for sure, what dose a short wave radio pick up? I went and got a NOAA radio with AM/FM/TV1/TV2/NOAA bands on it and had seen one that had short wave but not some of the rest and didnt pick anything up on it, it was also a reciever only, I know as I understand that CBs and such work on SV but what good is that if you cant ask questions or call for help if needed? So what do they pick up and why is it better than other bands?
     
  2. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    SHort wave is just another band that is broadcast on, like AM or FM. The benefit of SW is that it travels Long, Long distances and you can regularly pick up broadcaset from Europe, South America, etc.

    Sometimes the 'truest' news comes from outside the country where a disastor has occured. I don't know that I'd consider it a must have though. If you want to talk back, you'll need Ham or Amatuer Radio bands and transmitter.

    I'd concentrate on local, (2-4 mile) communications first, Like Talkabouts, and CB.. A shortwave for listening to far away and perhaps a Ham radio setup for talking to groups in other states...

    Huge topic
     
  3. monkeyman

    monkeyman Monkey+++ Moderator Emeritus Founding Member

    Cool, thanks.
     
  4. ghostrider

    ghostrider Resident Poltergeist Founding Member

    Shortwave is low frequency/ long wavelength.
    Good link.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shortwave
    By contrast with this 30 MHz, your microwave oven is 2 GHz (2000 MHz), your cordless phone could be 900 MHz, in the unlicensed band at either 2 GHz, or 5.8 GHz. Your DSS satellite system is 18 GHz, with a shorter wavelength, that's why the signal gets attenuated in the rain. Any communications medium is limited by terrain and distance. Line-of-sight radios are limited to about 30 miles by the curvature of the earth. With a mountain to put them on, and dry air, you might get 100 miles. The shortwave radio can actually bounce off the atmosphere, back to earth. A CB is lower frequency FM, around 27 MHz, but is usually more limited by antenna and power. Even a CB can talk several miles line-of-sight with a directional antenna.
     
  5. melbo

    melbo Hunter Gatherer Administrator Founding Member

    Ghost, are you a HAM?
     
  6. ghostrider

    ghostrider Resident Poltergeist Founding Member

    No, I never did the shortwave thing.
     
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