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Mylar bags and food storage?

Discussion in 'General Survival and Preparedness' started by slots, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. slots

    slots Monkey+++

    I've been searching for a source of Mylar bags for food storage (not easy in the UK). Then I came across this:

    Is this correct? I can't believe all those preparedness sites pushing a food storage method that might be lethal.

    Here's the site I got the quote from.

  2. hartage

    hartage Monkey+++

    I tend to think a lot of plastics around you will produce formaldahyde when broken down. Plastics are known to form toxic smoke when burned. Not sure mylar will breakdown short of being burned or exposed to constant outdoor uv light. Plastics next to food are all around us. I imagine plastics do release chemicals into the foods as this article suggests http://www.chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/2007/09/01/120736/Polycarbonate-baby.htm

    I'm just not sure mylar will release any more or less than others do. If you already use plastics with your food not sure mylar will make much difference leechate wise.
  3. ghrit

    ghrit Ambulatory anachronism Administrator Founding Member

    There are different flavors of plastics, some far more suitable than others for food storage. Proper mylar is not one of them for several reasons. Better off with the ones that are advertised as food storage containers rather than some of the other types better suited for holding electronic parts. I cannot state offhand which flavors are more or less likely to contaminate edibles. It is WELL worth prowling google to check out the ones you might like to try. There are also a few threads on this site that cover food storage. One thing for sure, most, if not all plastics will degrade over time (some LOTS of time) with exposure to sunlight and ozone. The one that makes me laugh are the so called biodegradable plastics that really don't; they simply offgas until the hard parts are all that is left. Reduced in mass, yes, but still there.

    IIRC, of course.
  4. Minuteman

    Minuteman Chaplain Moderator Founding Member

    A form of formaldehyde is used as a preservative in white bread. I find the quote dubious. I have a lot of pre-Y2K food that is packed in mylar. It is still good today 8 years later. I would think that it would take decades in a landfill to disintegrate. Not a few years in a pantry.
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