Texas felon, on gun laws ( update )

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by SonOtheSouth, Jan 28, 2013.


  1. SonOtheSouth

    SonOtheSouth Monkey

    So, I after speaking to several gun rights lawyers on the subject of possessing a firearm in my home as a felon, the bottom line is that under Texas state law, it is perfectly leagal to own a firearm in the home ( not out of it ) after the 5 year mark of being "off paper".
    However, the Federal law boils down to the fact that the gun has to be manufactured in Texas, and not involved in interstate or international commerce. Sounds crazy, but it's the facts... And, I could and probably would be charged by the feds, and although I could beat the case in court, it would be costly.
    Besides that, not sure if ANY guns are manufactured in Texas, and even if there was I cant purchase one from an FFL dealer... So I would have to find an individual to sell one...blah blah blah.....

    Bottom line is that Texas says its fine but Big Brother will put their boot on my throat till the bitter end.
    Question is, am I willing to fight the system and partake in my God given right to own guns ? Nope.. not at this time anyway. So, that's that.

    Thankfully, Muzzleloaders are not included in the Federal law as firearms, nor in Texas... so call me Davy Crockett... it's about to get smokey around here !

    Check out this 20 gauge double barrel pistol...
    url.
     
  2. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    I happen to like old guns. that is a beauty. Now don't forget, just because you are restricted to BP, it doesn't have to be antique BP. I remember reading about battery operated trigger assemblies for long guns a while back, virtually eliminated guns "hanging fire". I think it was TC. Is there any restriction on parts from out of state? Could you build what you want from parts?
     
  3. Moatengator

    Moatengator Monkey

    I know that Bond Arms are made in Texas,,DTech's are made there too, but I think they only make AR-style uppers. I hope you can get adequate protection for you and yours.
     
  4. SonOtheSouth

    SonOtheSouth Monkey

    Kellory, actually, and unfortunately, it does have to be antique, or replica of an antique manufactured prior to 1899 ( I believe thats the correct year. )
    Bottom line is modern style 'inline' muzzleloaders that use shotgun primers etc are off limits.
    But that's okay...
     
  5. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    See if you can find a BP club in your area. you may be able to work a private sale, for a BP gun, already there, and still be legal.
     
  6. SonOtheSouth

    SonOtheSouth Monkey

    It's legal for me to walk in to Cabellas or any other store and purchase BP guns, with no hassle.
     
  7. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    "However, the Federal law boils down to the fact that the gun has to be manufactured in Texas, and not involved in interstate or international commerce." I thought that would be ruled out by this.
     
  8. SonOtheSouth

    SonOtheSouth Monkey

    No, because BP are not considered firearms by the Feds, or my state.
     
  9. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    Now all you have to check on is if it is LEGAL in Texas for you to posses Black Powder.... A Class A Explosive..... and that is a whole other issue....
     
  10. SonOtheSouth

    SonOtheSouth Monkey

    Good point.
     
  11. SonOtheSouth

    SonOtheSouth Monkey

    I do know that the little booklets put out by the government (Texas) found at the walmart hunting section states that it is leagal for felons to hunt with BP antique/repleca guns... and it would be difficult to do if one could not use BP as a felon !
     
  12. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    maybe an air rifle?
     
  13. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    unless you are using the BP gun as a club.:rolleyes:
     
  14. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    .... as a reTIRED Powderman.... that was Licensed in three States.... There are very strict Federal Regulations for Possession of Class A Explosives... and the Federal Orange Book sets these out, and sets Quantities, that can be Stored, and Magazine Designs that MUST be adhered to,
    as well as DOT Shipping issues.... Of course this does NOT APPLY to ANY of the BP Substitutes, as they are just Flammable Materials. The Regs were significant;y tightened after 9/11, and they haven't changed much since....
     
  15. SonOtheSouth

    SonOtheSouth Monkey

    Texas and federal law agree on BP. It is legal for me to own with the intention of using it with an antique BP gun. Up to 50lbs.... scary huh ? lol
     
    Brokor likes this.
  16. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    Well there you go.... You are all set... I think I still have a couple hundred pounds in the Magazine... Haven't checked it in a couple of years.....
     
  17. Airtime

    Airtime Monkey+++ Site Supporter

    I have been keeping my eyes out for a BP 44 cal 6 shooter in stainless steel based upon the New Army design such as the 1858 Remington. Low maintenance, not a "firearm" and not too bad to shoot. Maybe a Ruger Old Army but more likely an Italian copy of the 1858 Remington. The 1858 has the top strap over the cylinder and can quick change to pre-loaded cylinders permitting rapid reloading. There are folks offering conversion cylinders too that will allow it to fire other rounds such as .45 colt or use smokeless powder. Opens the door to some interesting options.

    AT
     
  18. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

    I am certain there are a fair number of decent Americans who, when they were young made a few mistakes. And I am certain the government took full advantage of this and essentially created a situation where the citizen can no longer defend ones self from said government abuses, or to prevent harm to come to them from another. The implementation of tyranny is never a sensible one, although its methods clearly make sense in the way it transfers power from the people collectively and individually to government. I have known people who classify as a "felon", even if the crime was not violent --and after twenty years or more as a spotless, decent citizen are held in the same regard by the government. This is how slaves are made.

    And just like any decent American who has an inalienable right to defend self and property, what the government doesn't know can't hurt them. The government would like very much to close the door on person-to-person sales of firearms, and have been attempting this for a long time. We should always remember that America has become a police state, with more inmates per capita than any nation on Earth. The supposed "land of the free" is in reality, just an abusive fascist empire hiding under the guise of a democracy, with nearly no knowledge of its former existence as a republic. From the government mandated curriculum and media indoctrination, to forced vaccinations and tainted food and water supplies, sterilization campaigns and constant Balkanization, it is no wonder how they managed to be so successful.

    I am no fan of criminals, I would like to make that point clear. However, the line which separates a criminal today from a "law-abiding" citizen is so thin, that we are often times treated the same regardless. The police in many areas do not differentiate between a prison inmate and a free citizen, often treating people like criminals before trial by jury and becoming their executioners, too. The police seem to value their own lives more than performing their duty, which requires them to sometimes stand in harms way to accomplish their tasks. They wear body armor and typically do not stand alone, having plenty of support from their brethren. At the first sign of trouble, some police would rather kill than even allow the remote chance for violence to occur, many times killing an unarmed "perpetrator" in the act of committing no crime at all. The system is set up to protect the establishment, their corporate partners, and grant immunity to police who would rather kill than do the right thing. A police officer can easily kill and receive vacation, often paid, and very little administrative punishment, even if the person he killed was blatantly not a threat to them or others. A citizen must have laws to "protect" their inalienable rights in effect, and always prove they were in the right to use force against another. The citizen must also be arrested, property seized, incarcerated, processed and await trial, all the while losing wages from their place of employment, and most likely will never be able to seek compensation. In states where the Castle Doctrine is not well defined or even in place, much worse could happen. The families of the deceased could take legal action against the citizen, and additional charges can be administered by the state.

    This is the country we live in today. Some would like to believe it is as close to perfection as it can ever be, and they are patriotic and proud, having served their country bravely and living a good, simple life. These people have not lived in areas which are rampant with violent crime and abusive police, or the circumstances in which they exist have led them to live in complete denial. This corrupt system receives much of its support from people like this, who often feel content with claiming the police are here to help us live good lives. Although it is true that in some rural towns across the nation, and in states where gun rights are not rampantly assaulted, the police and citizenry commonly have good relations since crime is kept in check to a fair enough degree it isn't a problem. These areas are quickly evaporating, though --slowly replaced by stormtroopers and gestapo tactics. And through all this, one standard remains the same: the collective power of the state. We should not forget the basic tenets of freedom, laid out in very clear writing by the founders of this great nation. We operate under the common law, and we are sovereign citizens with inalienable rights, each belonging to our individual states in the union. We should never accept the concept that we are simply citizens of "the United States", under Admiralty and to be assessed by colorable law known as codes and policies. The merchant law doctrine does not apply to free people. We should never grant authority to those who practice rule under arbitrary law.
     
    SonOtheSouth and JABECmfg like this.
  19. SonOtheSouth

    SonOtheSouth Monkey

    Great post Brokor ! Couldn't agree more. However, it is what it is at this point... and there is no fixing it short of revolution.
    Bottom line is that if I stand up for my God given right to bear arms, I could easily find myself behind bars... and while I could declare the principles our country was founded on to the top of my lungs, and while others in the "free world" could talk about it online, and make great youtube videos on the subject... nobody is going to actually DO anything about it. And I'll be stuck in a cell with some crack head picking his scabs and taking dumps 3 feet from my head while I'm trying to sleep. [gasmask]
     
    Brokor likes this.
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