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traveling north across the country

Discussion in 'General Survival and Preparedness' started by SoCal09, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. SoCal09

    SoCal09 Monkey++

    Its 3am and im leaving central texas and traveling north with the ol lady to visit her folks in Minnesota. I've got my bug out bag and some extra cold weather gear, anything yall can tell me of what to expect from the travel conditions on ih35?
  2. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

    You can expect a lot of asphalt and painted lines.

  3. KYNabob

    KYNabob Monkey+

    Get off the computer and pay attention to your driving!
  4. kckndrgn

    kckndrgn Moderator Moderator Founding Member

    Where at in MN?

    Expect it to get colder as you go north, and you'll start seeing a bunch of white stuff on the ground - that's frozen rain, it's called snow :)

    On a more serious note, an extra blanket or 2 per person, hand and foot warmers (the kind that warm up when exposed to air). Assuming you've driven (or at least she has) in snowy roads before? Stay clear of snow removal equipment, seemed like every year someone would decide to play chicken with one. Good luck on your drive, heard from my sister in southern MN they are expecting another 3-5" tonight.
  5. Siskiyoumom

    Siskiyoumom Monkey+

    If you are driving, keep some extra gear in your rig.
    Chains with bungy tightening cords.
    A fully charged cell phone and or cb radio or short wave radio.
    A print out of the emergnency services along your route.
    Don't just depend on gps, have paper maps on hand for the area you are traveling.
    Practice putting on the chains BEFORE you really need to.
    Yes, chains sound like the rear end of your rig is falling off. That is a normal sound.
    Have a tarp to lay to put the chains and a rain suit. You will not regret it.
    Pull off safely and know that other folks may not see you.
    Have your lady friend standing watch for you.
    I love it when my husband or carpool buddy hold a big golf umbrella over me to keep me from getting too snowed on.
    Have a stay safe bag for your lady friend also.

    My winter truck bag has:
    head lamp with extra batteries and bulbs.
    two sets of gloves: one heavy duty winter and one set of mechanics gloves for chicks [it makes it easier to put on the chains]
    Rain suit.
    Snow suit.
    Winter boots, three sets of socks.
    A change of clothes, think in terms of layers.
    I love having a hoody sweat shirt on when I chain up because it keep snow off my neck and back.
    First aide kit.
    Bike flag on a pole [ a triangular blaze orange flat on a five foot pole]

    In the past I have gorilla taped it to my roof rack when I was in white out conditions.
    It allowed the snow truck to know my rig was off the side of the highway.

    Hobo stove and off the shelf easy to heat up food and a cheap Salvation army boy scout cook set.
    1 gallon of water.
    Phone card, defensive walking stick.

    I don't have a CC, so I have the stick, as well as a big can of bear spray [size of a can of spray paint].

    Keep your gas tank at 3/4 minimum.
    Keep in touch with the folks you are traveling to, in case you do break down and need a helping hand.
    Lots of great music to listen to.

    I also carry a small scoop type shovel to clear my road of rocks.

    And a cheapo broom to know the snow off the limbs of the trees on my road.

    It truly sucks the big one when your wiper blades brake due to the snow load on the branches.

    Our property is usually below the snow line, but we drive up over a mountain to get to the highway.
    I love my studded tires and yep, some locals think I am nuts to put them on each winter.
    But I have never regreted having them.
    Cut my teeth driving in TRUE winter conditions in Fairbanks AK, and I have to say that I do miss the far northern winter because it feels less cold to me than the coastal cold here.

    I truly admire anyone able to live year round where they have a of ice and snow each year.

    The pictures are of our forest service road to our place on a pretty mild winter day.
    012808_08181. 020908_17171. jas 897.JPG
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