What should we teach the children?

Discussion in 'General Survival and Preparedness' started by Zimmy, Jul 30, 2018.


  1. Zimmy

    Zimmy Wait, I'm not ready! Site Supporter++

    Somewhere there was list from the Jeffersonian era of things a young Virginian man should know how to do.

    I was thinking about what things monkeys would teach the little apes in a perfect world. My kids can do most of these, although no single one can do all. They're stronger as a group, per design.

    Please add ideas as you get them.

    Advanced First aid

    Geometry

    Algebra

    Practical chemistry

    Swimming to Scuba level

    Heavy equipment operation

    Advanced driving course

    Hand to hand combat unarmed, knives, staff, long blades.

    Firearm training including CQB, tactical, long range shooting, maintenance, and reloading.

    Basic computer coding

    Gardening

    Foraging for food and water.

    Raising domestic farm animals

    Hunting and processing wild game.

    Fishing, lines and nets

    Rigging, block and tackle application

    Quality Cooking

    Food preservation

    Vehicle maintenance theory

    Land navigation and maps

    At least one foreign language

    Boating

    Yoga and meditation

    Carpentry

    Electronics

    Welding

    Prayer and religious studies

    HAM radio skills

    Volunteer work

    American constitutional theory and history.

    Treatment of illnesses.
     
  2. Zimmy

    Zimmy Wait, I'm not ready! Site Supporter++

    I suppose there should be something related to the Arts. Musical instruments, painting, sketching, ect.

    Really not my forte
     
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  3. Out in the woods

    Out in the woods off-grid in-the-forest beekeeper

    As the wise Lazarus Long once said:
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.

    Those were the things we focused on when raising our children.
     
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  4. DKR

    DKR Raconteur of the first stripe

    A young man should know proper etiquette, have some minimal social skills. Crital thinking is a hard thing to teach It must be developed through mentoring and shared example.

    Crital thinking is a life long learning effort as well.

    I would add some world history and cultures of other peoples as well.
     
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  5. Zimmy

    Zimmy Wait, I'm not ready! Site Supporter++

    The algebra, chemistry, geometry, rigging, and foreign language study are more about brain development (towards critical thinking) than the individual value of each skill.
     
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  6. DKR

    DKR Raconteur of the first stripe

    Good point Perhaps parsing of other people’s words/actions could be more apt for my initial thought.

    Saves being blindsided.
     
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  7. Zimmy

    Zimmy Wait, I'm not ready! Site Supporter++

    I need that skill. I'm a little too literal
     
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  8. In school the relevance, and utility of geometry, trig, was immediately obvious to me. Algebra was another case altogether. They change the rules for every problem. "Course could'a been the personality conflict I had with the first Algebra teacher I had. When I went back to it as an apprentice, (radically different) teacher, it was a breeze.
     
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  9. Zimmy

    Zimmy Wait, I'm not ready! Site Supporter++

    Algebra is just another way to ask questions. I like the mental flexibility it adds.

    I didn't really "get" algebra until college. I just faked it in high school so it was worthless to me.
     
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  10. BTPost

    BTPost Stumpy Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    In College, Calculus was my “Moby Dick” and i failed it, every semester... I had tutors, help from Profs, it just didn’t click... My Brain just isn’t wired for it...One reason I went to Chemistry, instead of Physics... The Math Department Dean called me into his office at the end of my senior year, and told me, “ Mr Gordon, We of the Math Department have watched you struggle with this material, We know you have tried your best, but even with all our help, it just doesn’t seem to be your Forte.... So, Since this is a REQUIRED Course, We have decided to award you a D- Grade in Calculus, IF and obly IF, you Promise, on your Word of Honor, NEVER TO GRACE THE HALLS of a School of Higher Education, in Mathematics, for the rest of your life...” I was stunded, but quickly recovered, and said “Deal”... and I have kept that deal for 50+ Years... Isn’t Education Grand...
     
  11. Asia-Off-Grid

    Asia-Off-Grid RIP 11-8-2018

    Geometry was great for me, aside from proofs and theorems. Those, I could not stand.

    ============================================

    English, especially grammar and literature, should be on the list.
    And proper manners, something which is seriously lacking in this part of the world.
     
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  12. Seawolf1090

    Seawolf1090 Retired Curmudgeonly IT Monkey Founding Member

    I took Agebra at vo-tech school one summer, as I needed a credit in math and failed a math class - the teacher and I hated each other and I walked out of her class. I aced the adult ed course, and got along great with the instructor.
    I never used algebra until I became a programmer-analyst.
    Been doing my own auto mechanics, home electrical and plumbing, etc. since Dad began teaching me as a kid. He was a big DIYer, so I am too. We built our boathouse/garage building, so I learned carpentry and masonry. We did years of commercial fishing, and a little yard gardening. Veggies and fruit.
    I'm not a total Renaissance Man, but I do what I can.
     
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  13. GrayGhost

    GrayGhost Monkey++

    Yous be surprised (maybe not?) at how many kids and young adults can't read a tape measure, tell time from an analog clock, or write in cursive.
     
  14. Tevin

    Tevin Monkey+++

    A lot of this depends on lifestyle and locale. I don't see "swimming to SCUBA level" and "boating" as being important if you are in the middle of, say, New Mexico. And I'm sure most people can get by without knowing "heavy equipment operation".

    Basic math & science makes sense.

    Auto repair...great idea in theory but in the practical world it's getting harder and harder due to technology and proprietary systems.

    Computer coding...not really needed to get through life, but useful as a means of income. You have to commit to re-learing the new languages, which change constantly. If you're not coding for a living it's probably more trouble than it's worth.

    Food prep & gardening...yah that's a very useful everyday skill.
     
  15. Asia-Off-Grid

    Asia-Off-Grid RIP 11-8-2018

    But, they can text at 45 wpm - shortcut texting.
     
  16. GrayGhost

    GrayGhost Monkey++

    They've gotta be good at something, I guess...
     
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  17. Zimmy

    Zimmy Wait, I'm not ready! Site Supporter++

    Many of these might not be practical in general experience yet could prove invaluable if needed and no one in the group can do them.

    Also, these are confidence builders and pride points added to fight insecurities and indecision in life.
     
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  18. arleigh

    arleigh Goophy monkey

    Knowing and working with in the box, and the courage to think out side the box and knowing when and where to share the out side the box thinking.
    There is a time and place to share what you know, and there is a time as well to with hold certain information . others will abuse you and your knowledge ,your knowledge is worth something .
    The courage to learn new things, and to discern between reality and fantasy , truth and speculation, law and morality .
    People often learn what they can do, but haven't the foresight to know whether they should. .
     
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  19. Brokor

    Brokor Live Free or Cry Moderator Site Supporter+++ Founding Member

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  20. Seawolf1090

    Seawolf1090 Retired Curmudgeonly IT Monkey Founding Member

    I utterly abhor "text speak". It might have had a use when pagers had very limited character lengths, but should be banned now. It's ruining written English.
    Basic Electronics is a difficult sell too, as nearly all electronics devices are made in a way repair is impossible. Few discrete components. Sealed circuit boards.
    Which factors into auto repair too - unrepairable systems. Without replacement parts and modules, the car is dead.
    The need for special tools impacts it too.
     
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