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Would you be prepared for this?

Discussion in 'General Survival and Preparedness' started by stg58, Oct 10, 2015.

  1. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

    You're on foot.

    Are your important papers, matches and electronics in a dry bag?
    Is your pack secure so you won't empty the contents in the river?
    Is your bug out bag ready to go swimming?

    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015
  2. BTPost

    BTPost Old Fart Snow Monkey Moderator

    Or are you smart enough to look at the Bridge, BEFORE! you attempt to cross it......
  3. stg58

    stg58 Monkey+++ Site Supporter+ Founding Member

    Given that it took a laboratory analysis I doubt a visual inspection would have revealed the faults.

    The *claim* is:
    In a press statement, Department of Conservation deputy director general operations Mike Slater said laboratory analysis revealed manufacturing defects (known as quench cracks and embrittlement) in a section of 24-millimeter-diameter high-tensile chain used on the bridge.

    Slater said checks haven't revealed any sections of the same batch of chain being used in the DOC's other suspension bridges around the country.
    Hikers in New Zealand fall 28 feet in bridge collapse - CNN.com
  4. Witch Doctor 01

    Witch Doctor 01 Mojo Maker

    I have a dry bag and if I was forced to Bug out on foot I would be using it as I have a lot of swamp to cross...
  5. Hanzo

    Hanzo Monkey+++

    Glad there was water and no one was seriously hurt. Falling 28' into a pile of rocks is no fun.
  6. techsar

    techsar Monkey++

    Agreed, Hanzo! But another thing is that they should not have been all bunched together while crossing that, or any other small footbridge...nor playing with their phone/camera when they should have been watching what they were doing. ;)

    And to answer the question posed, yes, I do waterproof the contents of my pack. Wallet goes in a ziplock bag. Not only keeps things dry, but really helps with buoyancy when you do go in the drink...
  7. Dunerunner

    Dunerunner Monkey

    the contents of my old pack are not water proof, but there is no way I'm crossing a foot bridge over a river either.....
    Seepalaces, Gopherman and stg58 like this.
  8. kellory

    kellory An unemployed Jester, is nobody's fool. Banned

    @techsar , that bridge was rated for ten people at a time. There were only 4 in their party. They were not a big factor in the bridge failure.
    Seepalaces, Hanzo and stg58 like this.
  9. Hanzo

    Hanzo Monkey+++

    In my youth, I have carried my mountain bike over a crusty old pipe than spanned a river because the bridge had disintegrated. Did it a couple of times. And it was a fair expanse too. About 90-100'. Like the chicken... to get to the other side. Older and wiser, and more busted up now, I would not do that any more. Plus, that pipe is 20+ years older too now. And my fatbike is heavy, at close to 70 pounds, both the bike and I would probably end up in the drink.


    Since I have crossed it last, they put a metal grate under the pipe. Wonder if someone fell in. I crossed the long grey one. It is maybe 10-12" diameter, but round. Wouldn't have done it if it was raining.
    stg58, Seepalaces and Dunerunner like this.
  10. Yard Dart

    Yard Dart Vigilant Monkey..... Moderator Site Supporter++

    #1 you always pack your ruck with waterproof bag's, and supplement with zip lock bags for the smaller stuff that is important. I live around a lot of water obstacles, never know on a get home movement, when one may need to cross that water.
    #2 a properly prepared ruck with water proof bags will float and will assist you as a flotation device across any water obstacle.
    #3 your wet pair of socks, do you no good when you go to swap out what you are wearing.....let alone your food and so on.
    #4 If this had been a tactical movement, only one person would have been on the bridge at a time. In a bug out, one person would cross, set up security and the rest would follow one at a time. Which also allows for a person on each side to perform a water recovery if some fell off the bridge or otherwise needed help.
  11. KAS

    KAS Monkey++

    water proof is one thing but how good is it when it is completly submerged for a minute or so ???
    and to how deep.
    Ganado likes this.
  12. 3M-TA3

    3M-TA3 Cold Wet Monkey

    I live in an area where you are usually wet whether you are in a river or not. We just get used to it and buy clothes that are either warmish when wet or dry fast. I still have a fondness for wool and don't care whether it is scratchy or not. Eff comfortable - alive and whining beats dead and comfortable. If it's going to be a slog I wear a liner underneath, and BTW pantyhose works well for that - a trick I learned from some relatives who were guides and outfitters in the Spanish Peaks.

    Packs aren't waterproof, but most of what is inside is reasonably water proofed depending upon what is in it. If I was crossing that river for tactical or bug out reasons, it sure as hell would not be on a bridge where you are both visible and expected. I'd probably scout a log or two that spans or mostly spans and shinny across one by one at night.

    If no other way to cross then scout some more and hopefully find a spot where the water is fairly shallow and not moving too fast, because I'd be wearing nothing but my boots with everything else in my pack, which along with my rifle would be held above the water as I wade across. If the water is deeper than that, then there is usually a boat you can liberate or something else to float you to the other side.

    An advantage of moving only at night and being wet and sloppy to boot is that you don't show up as easily on IR. Hole up during the day in something small along the lines of a sniper's hide where you won't be easily found.Your wet things, which should be in muted colors can dry while you are holed up. They should be concealed, but visible from your hide where you will possibly get advance warning should they be found.
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015
  13. Falcon15

    Falcon15 Falco Peregrinus

    The vast majority of the contents of my BOB that could be affected by water are water proofed by being vacuum sealed. I check the contents 2 times a year when I do seasonal swap out. The bags are not only water proof, they also reduce the size of some items (most notably clothing, towel, etc.) but will also serve secondary functions when opened and can be resealed (if you are careful) in the field using the back of a heated knife. While resealing the bags does not re-instate the vacuum conditions, it does provide water proof security.

    Edit: being wet and sloppy (temporarily) is a far smaller problem than ruined food, maps, electronics, etc.
  14. Airborne Monkey

    Airborne Monkey Gorilla Survivalpithecus

    That's why you should only hump a ruck across suspension bridges over rivers with a ruck full of nothing but your blown-up air mattress ... you know, to make it look like you're humping a really heavy ruck. But it floats.

    Get it?

    Owell, I guess you had to be there.
    Brokor, Yard Dart and Ganado like this.
  15. chimo

    chimo the few, the proud, the jarhead monkey crowd Site Supporter+

    Everything in my get home bag that can be damaged by water is protected from water. Planning for Murphy should be a no-brainer, no?
    chelloveck likes this.
  16. Tully Mars

    Tully Mars Metal weldin' monkey Site Supporter+

    Like @Falcon15, I'm a big fan of vac sealing EVERYTHING I possibly can. Like mentioned, not only does it keep out the water and reduce the overall size of many items, it also keeps out/in odor. I can think of times when that is handy. I've never tried to reseal a bag once opened. I just carry several different sizes of zip lock bags for after the vac seal is breached. Has worked well for me for many years now.
  17. arleigh

    arleigh Goophy monkey

    I bag every thing that is water sensitive and include a trash bag for the off time that things or I need to float across water.
    I more or less depend on binding my gear rather than a vacuum, due to the fact that, if the vacuumed bag fails while submerged the failure can draw the water in faster then a some what neutral atmosphere. and the space remains the same between uses.
    I can say this about the vacuum is that no critters are going to be living in it in the mean time and that's a good thing.
    As for crossing a foot bridge ,one at a time and the lightest one first. might be more appropriate. And
    I don't go any where in the woods, with out a rope.
    My folding shovel doubles as a grappling hook .
    Yard Dart and chelloveck like this.
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